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Lighting

A Chelsom LED reading light above a white bed

Product watch: LED reading lights from Chelsom

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: LED reading lights from Chelsom

As part of Chelsom’s new collection, Edition 27, the dynamic lighting brand has introduced a ‘totally original’ collection of LED reading lights…

A Chelsom LED reading light above a white bed

Edition 27, as reviewed by our team last year, is an eclectic lighting collection, featuring beautifully designed lighting products – from striking chandeliers to LED reading lights – specifically for the global hospitality and marine interior design marketplaces.

Amongst many things, Edition 27 offers the widest range of LED reading lights in the company’s history. The versatile collection has been created to cater for all budgets and applications, taking design aesthetics to the next level without compromising on function and light output.

Products are CE and UL certified and all ranges are available in a variety of finishes, ensuring there is something perfectly suited to compliment any interior.

The brand new state-of-the-art LED reading light is discreet yet striking and perfectly easy to use. This wholly original design sits flush into any headboard and is as stunning when closed as it is open.

Since you’re here, why not read more about Chelsom’s Edition 27, which launched in Q4 last year?

Chelsom is one of our Recommended Suppliers and regularly features in our Supplier News section of the website. If you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips.

Main image credit: Chelsom

Two lights insight Hilton Hotel Airport

Case study: making style a priority in Hilton at Gatwick

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Case study: making style a priority in Hilton at Gatwick

Putting the spotlight for a moment on style, lighting brand Franklite reveals how its products were used to created timeless design inside Hilton London Gatwick Airport…

Two lights insight Hilton Hotel Airport

What factors do you consider when making a hotel reservation? Location? Route accessibility? Price? Whilst these are all important factors, equally important ones to consider are comfort, style and luxury. There is nothing more satisfying for a lighting brand to see their products being used in a creative way especially when it adds luxury and style to a space, such as this project from the Hilton London Gatwick Airport.

A subtle yet impactful light is the Aura wall light range. Designed to be inconspicuous until lit, this modern matt black cast aluminium LED fitting lines the hotel’s corridors. The foyer showcases multiple versions of this range as well each reflecting different light patterns onto the walls. When these beautiful patterns are cast it creates a piece of art.

The single-drop Cordelia is ideal for above a bar area within a restaurant. These beautiful satin brushed pendants with textured glass bases are available in gold and silver with some accents of chrome and matt black. The multi-drop versions will make a statement in a larger space such as a reception area or staircase.

The dining area has been divided into two distinct spaces by using different lighting families, the Eros and Spirit ranges. An additional feature of the Eros ceiling lights is the emergency reserve battery hidden within the fitting, combining style and functionality.

The dining area with our Eros and Spirit ceiling lights

Image credit: Franklite

Another exquisite feature in this area is the Eros wall light which has been installed within a frame-like moulding with decorative wall paper which accentuates the architecture of the space.

Franklite has been manufacturing and distributing lighting products for more than 45 years. The experts in its customer service and projects teams understand the importance of keeping up to date with changes in regulation, the development of efficient light sources, and changing interior design trends.

Franklite is one of our Recommended Suppliers and regularly features in our Supplier News section of the website. If you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips.

Image credit: Franklite

A close up of the Azzero Collection by Heathfield & Co

Heathfield & Co collaborates with Harris & Harris to create Azzero Collection

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Heathfield & Co collaborates with Harris & Harris to create Azzero Collection

Heathfield & Co’s lighting range with conscious design studio Harris & Harris centres on innovative use of materials, crafted with expertise and precision…

The Azzero Collection by Heathfield & Co in collaboration with Harris & Harris range’s aesthetic is underpinned by the prominent use of terrazzo stone; a material with a rich design heritage.

A close up of the Azzero Collection by Heathfield & Co

Presented in a black and white speckled finish, the terrazzo is paired with Rich Gold metalwork in a minimal form, and Opal white glass capsules, which provide a soft ambient glow.

With a minimal and sophisticated form, the Azzero table lamp (right) features a two-tone cylindrical base. The vertical stem leads to a deeply ribbed centre body which holds two delicately lit outward facing opal glass capsules. An extension of the table lamp design, the Azzero floor lamp (bottom) features a large rounded base in speckled black and white terrazzo stone. The Azzero desk lamp (left) is defined by its angular stem and intersecting ribbed metal cowl, making it an elegant addition to any home office or working space.

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Image credit: Heathfield & Co

Heathfield & Co is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Heathfield & Co

Franklite collage

Year in Review: Franklite reflects on its hero launches

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Year in Review: Franklite reflects on its hero launches

To conclude our Year in Review series, lighting brand Franklite throws it back to highlight the brand’s major launches of 2020…

Franklite has played an exceptional role in various projects over the course of the year, ranging from luxury hotels to executive homes over the UK and providing a range of exquisite lighting solutions to complement each individual space.

Franklite collage

The Taper Pendant has become a popular choice this year as it has appeared in numerous spaces including show homes and hotels. Available in smoked, copper and amber glass finish, these angle-cut pendants are on a matt black plate with black braided suspensions.

The single-drop Cordelia is ideal for above a bar area within a restaurant as displayed at the Hilton Gatwick Hotel. These beautiful satin brushed pendants with heavily textured glass bases to diffuse the light are available in gold and silver with some accents of chrome and matt black. The multi-drop versions will make a statement in a larger space such as a reception area or staircase.

Another favourite is the Dandy fitting, a contemporary spherical pendant in matt gold with matt black discs around the outside. A cluster of these pendants are featured perfectly within the recessed ceiling of the Vista restaurant at the Gleddoch Hotel.

2020 also saw the launch of Franklite’s Catalogue 26, showcasing an extensive range of fittings filled with a combination of innovative designs and our classic Franklite products that customers have come to know and love.

As the year draws to a close, we are putting the final touches to our first Catalogue 26 supplement, which will feature exciting new lighting solutions available to order from early 2021.

Franklite is one of our Recommended Suppliers and regularly features in our Supplier News section of the website. If you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips.

Main image credit: Franklite

Year in Review – lighting by Christopher Hyde

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Year in Review – lighting by Christopher Hyde

As we conclude our Year In Review, we take a look at what Christopher Hyde has launched in the last 12 months…

Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, Christopher Hyde launched a stunning new bathroom collection of opulent light fixtures. This exquisite collection of wall fixtures has captured the luxury quality that Christopher Hyde stands for without compromising on performance.

These fixtures can be manufactured to the IP44 standard allowing them to be specified for bathroom designs and fitted near showers, baths, and basins. Perfect for adding a splash of extravagance to those areas that need protection against moisture or dust, but equally as suitable for adorning a formal sitting room or hallway.

Not only did Christopher Hyde launch a new collection this year but also invested in a high-end renovation for its showroom in The Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour. The upgrade has provided our customers with even more space to view each fitting in comfort and style.

Neutral colour tones, soft grey panelled walls with light pine wood flooring all add to the aesthetics of the space. The implementation of an open plan concept creates a natural flow throughout the showroom. It is important to showcase each individual fixture to its full potential and now our products can be viewed from multiple angles.

As the year draws to a close and we reflect on the changes it has brought we can guarantee that at Christopher Hyde we will continue to create a tailored experience for each and every one of our valued customers.

Christopher Hyde is one of our Recommended Suppliers and regularly features in our Supplier News section of the website. If you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips.

Main image credit: Christopher Hyde

 

Product watch: Heathfied & Co’s Pearl Collection

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: Heathfied & Co’s Pearl Collection

Inspired by the iconic and classic symbolism of pearls featured throughout fashion, beauty and film over the years, Heathfield & Co’s Pearl Collection reflects the rare beauty of this unique gemstone…

Whilst each piece holds its own distinctive influence, opal glass spheres and hemispheres are characteristic throughout, each providing a soft ambient glow. Curved brass metalwork, subtly reflective surfaces and asymmetric configurations are combined to provide a cohesive visual identity.

Referencing a pearls timeless and traditional nature, these innovative designs carefully reinterpret the original aesthetic to create a simple, yet elegant range of contemporary lighting.

Perfectly petite, our Halo table lamp (left) demonstrates a contemporary design highlighted with classic styling. The subtly tapered alabaster cone creates a soft aesthetic, set off against polished brass metalwork and a defined opal glass globe, which provides an ambient glow.

Drawing inspiration from classic jewellery design, the vertical body of the brand’s Vermeer pendant (right) creates an elegant aesthetic in any interior. The piece features four opal glass spheres, asymmetrically positioned around its minimal form.

Audrey Pendant in the Pearl Collection | Image credit Heathfield & Co

Image caption: Audrey Pendant in the Pearl Collection | Image credit Heathfield & Co

Heathfield & Co is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image caption: Gabriella Pendant in the Pearl Collection | Image credit Heathfield & Co

Green light

Product watch: new ‘greenworld’ lighting from Inspired by design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: new ‘greenworld’ lighting from Inspired by design

Inspired By Design, which was a Product Watch Pitch partner of Hotel Designs LIVE, brings the outside indoors with its new range of biophilic lighting. The brand’s Simon Shuck explains…

Green light

During the pandemic, being outside and connecting with nature has never been more important. This helps us to relax and think more clearly. Following our recent attendance at two Hotel Designs LIVE virtual conferences, where public areas were put under the spotlight, it became apparent that this type of lighting is of paramount importance.

Public areas suffused with biophilic lighting exudes calmness and are more welcoming and have been reported to increase room rates. As moss and other biophilic materials absorb excessive noise, they create a more tranquil atmosphere reducing stress levels which is particularly beneficial in busy hotels, offices or clinical settings. So we realised that biophilic design enhanced entrances and other areas to be more inviting.

Our moss and foliage is 100 per cent natural and maintenance-free and can also be used to create walls and dividers to aid absorbing sound in open spaces; ideal for large lobbies in hotels and commercial buildings.

Bespoke lighting solutions

Whether dramatic, delicate or discreet, we work bespoke to transform lighting ideas into reality – however flamboyant, we offer bespoke solutions. As one of the UK’s leading lighting suppliers, we love creating unique designs – the more fantastic the better.

Our lighting is sheltered in five-star hotels worldwide including London, Monaco and Beverley Hills and Dubai.

More recently, we are just about to start working on a new Hilton hotel in Woking, which is being structurally designed by architecture firm Gensler, where we will be supplying all the bedroom lighting together with bespoke decorative in all the public areas.

Since you’re here, why not read our Hotel Designs LAB article on biophillic design 2.0 – from living walls to living hotels?

Presently we are quoting for all the external lighting for a resort in Seychelles.

Inspired By Design was a Product Watch Pitch Partner at Hotel Designs LIVE. 

Main image credit: Inspired By Design

A purple lit bathroom with black bath and candles on the floor

Industry insight: adding personality in the bathroom with scenic lighting

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Industry insight: adding personality in the bathroom with scenic lighting

Bathroom brand Duravit explores lighting in the bathrooms, both as a functional element and as a personal one…

Light is functional and atmospheric and plays an elementary role in the bathroom. There are three aspects that need to be considered for the perfect lighting setup: basic lighting, accent lighting, and functional lighting.

A purple lit bathroom with black bath and candles on the floor

While basic lighting lights our way, accent lighting injects a feel-good factor into the lighting concept. Contrast-rich and expressive lighting generates a stimulating atmosphere in the bathroom and creates cozy accents. Conversely, the focus at the washing area is on functional lighting this needs to be bright without dazzling the user.

Image caption: Illuminated treasure chest: an optional inner lighting system is available for the Happy D.2 Plus vanity unit. The LED light turns on or off when the drawer is opened or closed. | Image credit: Duravit

From warm white to neutral white and up to daylight white – the spectrum of light colours ranges from warm yellow to cool blue, you can enjoy the perfect light at any time of day: cold in the morning to wake you up, warm in the evening to help you relax.

Duravit is one of our Recommended Suppliers and regularly feature in our Supplier News section of the website. If you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips.

Since you’re here, why not read more about the psychology of colour?

Main image caption: Candlelight and mirror lighting light up the darkness: Happy D.2 Plus mirror with circular ambient light. The LED- lighting can be individually configured via the touchscreen | Image credit: Duravit

Image of pictures hung on the wall

Industry insight: the art of lighting

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Industry insight: the art of lighting

As we begin to steer our editorial attention towards art, lighting brand Franklite offers an interesting perspective on the possibilities of creative lighting schemes…

Image of pictures hung on the wall

Artists use light to give form, depth and atmosphere to their piece when they sculpt. By studying the way light works artists used this knowledge to evoke an emotional response with their audience. Leonardo Da Vinci researched the effects of light during the renaissance, breathing a new sense of life and realness into his paintings that wasn’t present in the most religious art of that time.

With light being so important in the creation of art, it is equally, if not more, important in the display of that art. There are various ways to light art, ranging from the picture light to the framing projector. Accent lighting is used to highlight pictures and collections by accentuating architectural features, adding drama and creating a mood.

Last year in Amsterdam at the Independent Hotel Show, Franklite collaborated with the Saatchi Gallery to illuminate their exhibition. In these portrait pieces it was important to highlight the faces of the subjects. For this the lighting designer decided to utilise our adjustable picture lights to direct the light source as required.

The brand’s picture lights are available in modern matt gold, bronze, polished brass and satin nickel finishes to suit any décor and the LED lamps come in a variety of colour temperatures to help you evoke the right mood for the space – and picture light dimming options are also available.

Franklite is one of our recommended suppliers and regularly feature in our Supplier News section of the website. If you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips.

*Lights supplied for the Saatchi Art Gallery by Franklite.

Main image credit: Franklite

A number of wall and floor light pendents

Product watch: Sustainable Kyoto lighting by Harris & Harris

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: Sustainable Kyoto lighting by Harris & Harris

Harris & Harris, an environmentally and socially responsible interior and product design studio, unveils the Kyoto range, a sustainable lighting family with Eastern influences featuring bamboo and opal glass…

A number of wall and floor light pendents

The Kyoto lighting range by Harris & Harris is a calming lighting family, will provide a sense of zen to any interior.

The designs are influenced by the Harris & Harris’s founders European and Asian heritage coupled with Modernism and 1960s Pop Design and their love of craft and texture

The lights are named after Japan’s historical city of Kyoto and comprises floor light, wall light, pendant and 2 sizes of table light for both residential and commercial settings

Hand made to order in England, the group of lights feature a mix of highly sustainable solid bamboo with bamboo sticks & string, reminiscent of a sushi rolling mat. A warm and soothing light emits from the matt opal glass globe, containing a low energy and efficient E14 G9 LED bulb. In the case of the floor and table lights, a woven power flex exits the bamboo ‘lily pad’ shaped base with an inline switch.

While you’re here, why not read more about how the conscious design studio Harris & Harris was born?

Main image credit: Harris & Harris

Feature: How lighting has changed

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Feature: How lighting has changed

To mark Lighting being put under the editorial spotlight for the second time this year, Hotel Designs asked Franklite how lighting’s role in hotel design is changing…

Lighting is one of those extraordinary elements that gives hotels the comforts of home all while still experiencing the luxuries of what they have to offer. Certain spaces within hotels will require specific lighting and that’s where we come in.

Franklite provides innovative lighting solutions for any space, ensuring your design exceeds expectation. With a reputation built on using only the finest components in the manufacturing process and a laboratory which has one of the first near and far field goniophotometers – a development that measures light levels extremely accurately ensures that the lighting will be exactly as required.

Highlighting recent projects Franklite have had the pleasure of being involved with this year are the Palace Hotel Inverness and Gleddoch Hotel and Spa in Glasgow. The Vista Restaurant in the Gleddoch receives a lot of natural light due to the panoramic views of their 18-hole golf course. Changes in natural light are more noticeable during the day and as a result will require different lighting at different times. Understanding these distinctions has been the key to our success at Franklite.

A project currently underway at the Hilton Gatwick Hotel showcases the Aura wall light. The modern matt black cast aluminium LED fitting lines the hotel’s corridors. Designed to be inconspicuous until lit, these fixtures cast beautiful flower patterns on the walls mimicking a piece of art.

Franklite is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email  Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Franklite

 

How conscious design studio Harris & Harris was born

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
How conscious design studio Harris & Harris was born

Harris & Harris has earned Hotel Designs’ stamp of approval as an environmentally and socially responsible interior and product design studio…

Founded in 2014 by husband and wife team Alexander and Sharon Harris, Harris & Harris emerged onto the design scene as a sustainable breathe of fresh air. Working internationally, the studio creates chic yet playful designs focusing on craftsmanship and quality whilst minimising the impact on the planet – and it was this unique blend that caught our editorial attention.

The dynamic duo met in 2007 whilst working for an architecture practice in Melbourne, Australia. They moved to London in 2010 and later married and started a family whilst growing their dream design studio.

Prior to founding Harris & Harris, Alex worked for some of the biggest names in design; Terence Conran’s furniture company Benchmark, David Collins, Kelly Hoppen and Yoo, co-founded by Philippe Starck.

Sharon has a truly international perspective having worked as an interior designer in Singapore, Melbourne and London for blue-chip clients including China Construction Bank, Citigroup, Molton Brown and Goldman Sachs as well as the Dubai property developer Emaar.

In 2019, the team boldly stepped into a new territory by unveiling the conscious bedroom for the Independent Hotel Show London. The guestroom set that was designed sensitively challenged conventional hotel design from every angle.

The Harris & Harris team now creates inspiring and innovative designs for clients that include hospitality brands, interior designers and developers such as The Arts Club, Conran, Finchatton, Four Seasons, Hakkasan, The Hoxton and Soho House as well as private individuals. Products and projects reach far across the globe including Monaco, The Hamptons, Miami, Seoul, Munich, Limassol, Macau and Paris.

The studio’s Product Collection features more than 100 pieces of furniture, lighting, outdoor furniture and interior accessories, all designed in-house by the studio. The designs are influenced by the founders European and Asian heritage, together with their love of modernism, art deco, mid century and 1960s pop design.

Each product is handmade to order by skilled artisans and workshops and are named after the places Alex and Sharon have frequented around Singapore, Australia and Great Britain.

Image caption: The Raffles seating range, named after the iconic hotel, is a refined family that injects refined glamour into an interior space. The pieces are influenced by art deco style of designers, including Eileen Gray and Charlotte Perriand.

Aside from being a studio that shelters awe-inspiring design, Harris & Harris strives to be environmentally and socially responsible wherever they can and in all areas of the company. The studio developed the Product Collection to include as many of their self-initiated ‘Responsible Factors’ as possible:

1) Designed For Life Foundation

The studio established the ‘Designed For Life Foundation’ to donate a percentage of every sale from the product collection to charity. Their furniture and lighting is predominantly specified for luxurious hotels, bars, restaurants and high end private homes and the founders felt it was important to help balance this. So for every product sold from the Collection their clients are automatically donating to the following three charities concerned with providing those without the basic needs of food, water and shelter: FareShare – the UK’s national network of charitable food re-distributors, WaterAid – providing clean water and hygiene solutions worldwide and ShelterBox – an international disaster relief charity, providing emergency shelters.

2) Made in the UK

Most of the collection is manufactured in the UK. Being a London-based company, this helps reduce transport energy consumption, particularly when a project is also UK based. Producing in the UK also helps support local industry and communities.

3) Sustainable upholstery option

Most of the upholstered seating is designed to have the option of being manufactured with natural materials including coconut fibre, natural latex, wool & cotton wrap and feathers. This minimises the impact on the environment by reducing the use of harmful chemicals, plastics and oils as well being biodegradable at the end of the product’s life. Natural materials are also far better for the health and well being of those using the seating.

4) Made from recycled materials

Recycled materials have been introduced into many of the products. This includes working with the German manufacturer Magna to provide their ‘Glaskeramik’ material for table tops in the collection, which is produced from 100% recycled waste glass. Harris & Harris also works with London stone specialist Diespeker to provide their terrazzo material which includes crushed recycled glass and marble off-cuts. A selection of the products are produced from clay and terracotta which create very little waste as off-cuts and unused material can be easily reused in future production

5) Made from renewable, low-embodied energy and natural materials

Most of the products are made from abundant and sustainable materials. Harris & Harris uses timbers including Ash and bamboo, which is very fast growing and requires no fertiliser or pesticides. They use natural stone, glass, clay and terracotta on many of the products which have a very low embodied energy (the total energy within the material from extraction to finished product). The natural upholstery option minimises the impact on the environment as highlighted above and Harris & Harris work with UK based Alma Leather to provide their natural cow hides that have a sustainable 100 per cent vegetable tan finish. The studio will also be introducing a vegan option as an alternative to the current leather selection very soon

6) Made from FSC or PEFC-certified timber

Harris & Harris ensures its factories and craftsman only ever use sustainably sourced timber that has been given either FSC or PEFC certification. The studio will never use exotic tree species from non-renewable forests

7) Supplied with Low Energy LED Bulbs

The Azzero and Kyoto lighting ranges utilise efficient LED G9 bulbs. For the Wharf, Siloso and Chalford lighting ranges Harris & Harris works with the UK based lighting brand Tala to provide their long lasting and low energy LED bulbs. Tala bulbs look fabulous thanks to their old filament style design but with using the latest LED technology. Tala are committed to reducing carbon emissions in the atmosphere and support reforestation programmes around the world

8) Built for longevity and durability

Harris & Harris work with well respected craftsman, factories and workshops who use high quality production methods, together with durable and premium materials, to ensure the product collection is created for a long life span. The team is passionately against a throw away culture and design all of their products to be resilient and long lasting that can be handed-down over generations rather than thrown away

9) Easily disassembled and recycled at end of life

Many of the products are easily disassembled and can be taken apart by hand (or are single-material) so they can be separated into their individual materials to be recycled, biodegraded or reused.

Harris & Harris was a PRODUCT WATCH pitch partner for Hotel Designs LIVE, which took place on October 13, 2020.

Image credit: Harris & Harris

Dernier & Hamlyn updated and improved under new ownership

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Dernier & Hamlyn updated and improved under new ownership

Bespoke lighting manufacturer Dernier & Hamlyn has moved to new, premium premises in Chessington…

Dernier & Hamlyn’s new HQ incorporates a state-of-the-art studio where clients can work with the company’s design team to progress their lighting designs from concept to reality.

Significant investment is also being made in manufacturing and finishing capabilities including the latest technology and 3d printing, to ensure that the company’s reputation for the highest quality lighting is maintained and improved.

Experienced experts who previously worked for Dernier & Hamlyn are still part of the team including Head of Production Mark Pye, project manager Lyn Newcombe and Design Manager Adam Coare. Strategic and operational management of the company will be greatly enhanced with the appointment of Michael Mulhall as Director of Sales. Michael was previously head of major projects for Dernier & Hamlyn’s new owners NVC UK where he oversaw large lighting programmes for hospitality and luxury residential clients.

Mulhall says: “We were attracted to Dernier & Hamlyn by the strength of its brand and reputation in the lighting industry. Feedback from our research with designers and others has shown that the quality of the products manufactured was second to none, but there have been frustrations in the past with lead times and flexibility of delivery.

“Dernier & Hamlyn will operate as a totally autonomous company, but one that is part of a global organisation which made sales of more than $600 million in 2019. This gives us access to varied technical, engineering and design resources that complement our own, backed by sound financial support from shareholders including Schneider Electric. We will continue to deliver the high- quality lighting that Dernier & Hamlyn has always excelled in, but in ways that meet the needs of designers and clients in today’s markets.”

Dernier & Hamlyn is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email  Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Dernier & Hamlyn

Case study: lighting Jesmond Dene House

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Case study: lighting Jesmond Dene House

In a recent development of the public areas and bedrooms, Karen Walker Design created a series of design schemes focusing on complementary texture, pattern and colour. Here we explore Heathfield & Co’s role in lighting the spaces…

Jesmond Dene House is an independent boutique hotel located on the outskirts of Newcastle upon Tyne city centre.

Selected to bring harmony to the 43 guestrooms and suites, Heathfield & Co’s Coupole table lamps feature on each bedside, mirroring the classic contemporary aesthetic of the hotel. Additionally, their Pierre Monochrome table lamps are presented in the suites to add a tactile and sculptural focus point to the vibrant rooms.

Further highlights from Heathfield’s collection can be found in the public areas. A pair of Addison table lamps provide the scale required in the Great Hall Lounge, with their large smoke glass bodies and substantial brass metal details.

Image credit: Heathfield & Co/Michael Baister

Heathfield & Co is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Heathfield & Co/Michael Baister

Confessions of a lighting designer – what is lighting design?

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Confessions of a lighting designer – what is lighting design?

Throughout October we are, for the second time this year, putting the spotlight on lighting. To kickstart this series, we reach out to Gary Thornton, senior project designer at neolight global, to understand lighting design from the inside.

The profession of architectural lighting design is a relatively young industry, even though the practise of what we do in determining where there is light and where there isn’t has been around for centuries.

Of course back then this was simply people deciding where to put candles or, as far back as the 9th century, where to locate oil lamps.  But architectural lighting design as a more formal profession really only goes back to around the 1950s with the likes of Richard Kelly pioneering the practice, followed by people like Derek Phillips and Jonathan Speirs.

So what is lighting design and what is it that lighting designers actually do?  I’ve lost count of the times I’ve tried to explain this to my friends who think we “choose where to put light bulbs”!

It can be easily forgiven that it is not a widely known profession.  There is no formal educational pathway and many people stumble into the profession from a semi-related field of design and find themselves “doing lighting design” before they even realise what it is (myself included!).

As an example, our office comprises lighting designers with backgrounds in product design, interior design, electrical engineering, film and television, photography, sculpture and architecture.  There are indeed well-established Masters degrees, or undergraduate courses in Theatrical Lighting Design, but this is not the case for Architectural Lighting Design.  Something that has been brought up again recently in our industry.

Lighting

Lighting concerns itself with how people perceive their environment, yet because light is intangible it has an intrinsic, and often underestimated, role in all aspects of visual design.

Working in a medium which remains invisible until it strikes a physical surface means that we lighting designers must be as concerned with the nature of the surface and the biology behind the human eye as with the light which strikes it.

Ambient illumination, direct light, reflected light, the use of colour, areas of relative darkness and contrast all contribute to how a space looks and how it feels, resulting in designs made up of layers of light.  The better lighting schemes consider what should be left unlit as much as what should be lit, so maybe we are just as much “darkness designers” as we are lighting designers.

Because of the immateriality, great lighting is rarely lauded.  If you walk through a space and it looks and feels great then chances are it is because of the lighting. Not to take away from the interior designer, architect, or landscape designer that has typically designed more of the physical environment, but certainly in how the colours appear, how the material textures catch your eye, whatever the mood it prompts or the visual aesthetic it provides, it is because of the lighting.

Poor lighting on the other hand gets no end of complaints.  Lighting that is overly bright or dark, too much glare, or feels cold and uninviting can make spaces feel uncomfortable so people don’t want to visit and spend time there.  Even the best interior design schemes can be marred by bad lighting, and at the extreme bad lighting can even be bad for your health depending on the time of day or the tasks required of the people using it.

Lighting for hospitality

At the core of neolight’s work is the hospitality sector, and one of my favourite spaces to illuminate is the All Day Dining restaurant within a hotel.  This is largely because it’s such a transformative space and great way to demonstrate the power of lighting.  An All Day Dining restaurant needs to be able to provide a bright and fresh environment for breakfast, right through to the warmth and relaxing ambience of an evening meal.

When you get this right, the space will look and feel like a different restaurant to the guests from morning to night.

Lighting experiences

Architectural lighting design really started an accelerated upward curve with the mainstream adoption of LED.  Since then light sources have been getting smaller and more efficient, and the fixtures themselves are increasingly packed full of technology.

Alongside this evolution of lighting technology has been an evolving expectation of the role of the lighting designer.  No longer are we providing simple scene-setting schemes with smooth dimming to meet the client expectations, now clients are looking for more engaging and dynamic schemes concealed within the fabric of the building, with light that entrains and supports your circadian rhythm, they want an experience.

Yes the experience is framed by the architecture, or informed by the interior design, or the service that you receive, but transcending across all of those to make it a good experience is good lighting design.

Lighting design = experience design.  And if that helps become popular on social media, then all the better.

To this end we are not just designers anymore.  We have to be artists and scientists, knowledgeable in Bluetooth and LiFi, experts in daylight and green building codes, understanding biology of the human eye, of the physics of light, and all manner of material properties.

And this is all before we even mention the Internet of Things, where we are suddenly being asked about the limitations of LoRaWAN as a protocol to control light fixtures with.

Lighting is digital

There is an underlying expectation to all of this that we are digitally savvy.  Lots of industries are going through change and digitisation, but lighting is changing right up there with them.  In order to keep meeting the expectations of a modern day lighting design, we have to be able to understand and design with all these evolving elements.

One particular attribute that I’ve taken on is learning to code due to the increasing overlap with disciplines that do require this, and at the very least we need to be able to coordinate with them. For example, this is a prototype app written in Python that communicates with light fixtures in a hotel room to automatically adjust the colour temperature and brightness based on personal circumstances, such as jet lag.

Internet of Things

We have gone through the exponential growth of LED and now we have even further miniaturisation of technology so there is virtually nowhere that LEDs cannot be integrated, and conversely almost anything, like a sensor or a camera, that can’t be put back into light sources.

Lighting is a prime choice for the IoT to piggy back onto as it has an already existing ubiquitous infrastructure of power and data.  This means that light fixtures can be used for monitoring space occupancy, improving shopping experiences, reporting crimes, and more.

But in order to be able to implement this we have to understand it, and that means lighting designers becoming experts in something else that isn’t traditionally “lighting”.  It’s becoming experts in data, cloud servers, and Bluetooth meshes as part of the whole IoT network.

And this isn’t a trend that’s going away. At a macro level Smart Cities are well underway around the world (we are working on a Smarty City strategy for a brand new city in KSA at the moment), and on a micro level it’s using your voice to control the lighting in your own home. Lighting is a key part of the future of connected services.

Covid-19 will undoubtedly accelerate the demand for contact-free environments. Why carry a physical ID or ticket and have to touch door handles, when AI could verify you and open the door automatically?  Why touch any number of surfaces and interfaces to check-in to a hotel, when facial recognition could automate this as you walk through the lobby and give you a “key” on your mobile phone?

In assessing these expected trends we see that lighting is well placed to provide this as part of the IoT. Retrofitting sensor-embedded light fixtures becomes much easier than ripping out ceilings, pulling cables, and installing new networks.

As part of this learning curve affecting lighting, designers are no longer just visiting project sites, but also visiting data centres that test these sensor embedded light fixtures and the data points that they capture to understand it first hand in order to be able to implement it as part of a lighting scheme.

Misunderstandings

As lighting becomes more understood it’s great to now be reading comments like this, highlighting the importance of lighting to a space.

But for every moment of understanding, we still work with wider design teams who still misunderstand what we do. Consultants that have heard of ZigBee or BLE, and so that’s how they want their lighting controlled – when in reality all they really need is a simple control plate.

Part of our role is taking a step back from the technology and really understanding the project needs. We won’t use technology for the sake of it, especially if it’s not needed and likely to end up not being used.  How often have you struggled with a fancy lighting control system in a hotel guestroom when a simple rotary dimmer switch would have been just perfect?

As lighting design finds its way into mainstream vocabulary, more buzzwords like “human centric lighting” have come to the fore, which is another misconception to overcome.

Human centric design is human focussed design. At the heart of this notion is what we have been doing for many years now.  Designing for humans.  Lighting for humans.  Lighting for, and with, people at the centre.

The future

Who knows what the limits are to where lighting will reach – even a few years ago we were barely imagining what we have today of subscription models offering Lighting as a Service, secure wireless data through light in LiFi, and even highly secretive LED spectrum recipes used in horticulture to maximise crop yield!

Of what I have no doubt is that as lighting design continues to advance and evolve, so will the humble lighting designer along with it.

Main image credit: neolight

Light it up: Chelsom officially launches Edition 27

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Light it up: Chelsom officially launches Edition 27

More than two years in the making, Chelsom’s brand new lighting collection, Edition 27, has official launched. Hotel Designs celebrates by selecting some of its favourite pieces. Editor Hamish Kilburn writes…

Every two years on the international hotel design scene, something incredible happens. The industry becomes temporarily blinded by new lighting designs that are created with tomorrow’s luxury hospitality projects in mind. The brand behind this much-awaited artificial phenomenon is, of course, Chelsom.

The launch of a new ‘Chelsom Edition’ becomes a precious moment etched in modern design history, usually marked in a grand setting with no expense spared to introduce the A + D community with the brand’s latest dynamic and timeless designs. And although, this year, suppliers are prevented from hosting live events, this, by no means, makes Chelsom’s unveiling of Edition 27 any less sensational. In fact, some would go as far to argue that the pandemic has created a catalyst for brands like Chelsom to launch their latest products with a deeper meaning for the sake and sanity of tomorrow’s hospitality landscape.

As expected, the collection reflects Chelsom’s brand image, showcasing a plethora of beautifully designed lighting products specifically created for the international hospitality and marine interior design arenas. More than 40 per cent of the collection is entirely new and all pieces are available with LED light sources to accommodate the latest developments in technology and energy efficiency.

“I believe that our clients will not only appreciate the refinements we have made to our product collection in terms of even sharper product designs, higher quality levels and strong focus on value engineering, but also the continued evolution of our brand image as international market leader,” said Will Chelsom, Managing Director at Chelsom. “Both the catalogue and website illustrate this perfectly and have been carefully designed with our clients’ requirements as a priority.”

“Edition 27 has been a fantastic collection to produce and it’s our most ground-breaking to date.” – Robert Chelsom, Chairman at Chelsom.

Edition 27 is a truly eclectic harmony of lighting that harnesses and refines the latest trends in finishes and materials. Striking brass tones, textured Venetian glass and cutting-edge LED pieces are just some of the elements that dominate the bold and exciting new collection, offering designers creative lighting solutions for any interior space from guestrooms, to corridors, through to restaurants and other public spaces. Amongst many things, Edition 27 offers the widest collection of LED reading lights in the company’s history including the LED Eye range which moves on the aesthetics of your standard bedside reading light whilst maintaining all the successful features of function and light output.

Robert Chelsom, Chairman at Cheslom, added: “In all my years working within the industry never has there been a more challenging yet exciting time to be designing lighting products. Triggered by fashion cycles, interior trends are moving increasingly faster and in doing so constantly stimulate new design directions when it comes to finishes and materials, which is something we have given careful consideration to. Edition 27 has been a fantastic collection to produce and it’s our most ground-breaking to date. Will and I are proud to be able to say that all product has been designed in- house to create this diverse lighting collection that truly caters for all levels of the hospitality and marine sectors.”

Here are some of our editor’s picks:

LED EYE

Image caption: LED EYE | Image credit: Chelsom

Image caption: LED EYE | Image credit: Chelsom

When Chelsom designed the iconic bedside reading light LED Dock, the design intent came with years of experience in successfully lighting hotel guestrooms. Trying to mix being inconspicuous and striking at the same time was a large design challenge, little did they know it would become the company’s most successful product ever enhancing hotel schemes in more than 30 countries worldwide.

In the new collection, Chelsom moves on the aesthetics of a bedside reading light whilst maintaining all the successful features of function and light output. The starting point was to create a product that was inconspicuous in that it nestled successfully into a headboard with minimum projection and yet was cool and stylish to look at when guests first entered the room. Development led to compact and slim outer vessel  which surrounded the ‘eye’, a sculptured cast metal piece which invites the hotel guest to open the eyelid thereby illuminating the light and allowing a full range of movement to create the perfect light spill. Much time and engineering skill went into prototype development ensuring that the cast centrepiece revolve and rotates wit the lightest of touch and can be easily opened to operate the microswitch and closed to extinguish the light.

The highly tactile moulded centrepiece still remains extremely slim with a subtle curve at the bottom edge. Once opened the warm white LED light passes through a high-quality focusing lens to create perfect reading light.

Hybrid

Image caption: The Hybrid set | Image credit: Chelsom

Image caption: The Hybrid set | Image credit: Chelsom

The main concept of this striking collection of wall, floor and table lamps centres around the over-scaled cylindrical head, creating ambient room light through the matt opal glass top dome and directional task light from below. The head swivels from left to right with a mechanical stop to prevent over rotation.This sleek and contemporary range is available in an assortment of finish options and is the perfect fusion of design aesthetic and technological refinement making it the perfect addition to any interior space.

Crook

Crook features a stepped column supporting a shepherd’s crook-styled arm, which allows a good spread of downlight. The base on this product has a rounded stepped detail, while the lampholder cover features interesting knurled detailing.

Shield

On the wall, the perforated metal tapered half shield emits a warm glow and throws light onto the oval backplate, which creates a halo effect around its concave-curved perimeter. On the ceiling, the chandelier ha conical, perforated shades with opal acrylic liners giving a warm glow.

Glass Effect

Image caption: Glass Effect | Image credit: Chelsom

Image caption: Glass Effect | Image credit: Chelsom

The main concept of this striking range of wall lights centres around how light effect can be created on the wall and within different types of glass so that the fittings were not just about achieving ambience but also about the projection, pattern and play of light on surface and the refraction of light through different coloured and shaped glasses. Traditional components have been used in unique applications to achieve a powerful light effect suited to any environment with one of the key features being that the glasses can be fully interchangeable to create totally different results.

Cheslom is one of Hotel Designs’ recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Chelsom

Case study: lighting InterContinental Park Lane hotel

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Case study: lighting InterContinental Park Lane hotel

Located in the heart of London’s prestigious Mayfair, the InterContinental Park Lane hotel delivers elegant natural interiors, award-winning restaurants and bars, and unrivalled views of the Royal Parks…

Alongside designers RPW Design, Heathfield & Co were delighted to supply both bespoke and standard lighting from their product range, as part of the development of the hotel’s exclusive Mayfair Collection.

This luxurious range of guestrooms and suites are said to be ‘a refinement of the timeless elegance for which we are loved.’ With a careful attention to fine and subtle details, materials such as wood, leather and brass set the natural and comforting tone. Heathfield’s experienced team worked on a series of bespoke bedside ceiling fittings, inspired by their classic ‘Derwent’ design.

image credit: IHG/Heathfield & Co

The solid brass framework and Dandelion satin lampshades reflect in the panelled mirrors behind, perfectly framing the centre of the room. The Derwent Large cube pendant and Vivienne Clear glass table lamp create decorative features in the suites, enhancing the soft and elegant design.

To see the project in full visit Heathfield’s website.

Heathfield & Co is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: IHG/Heathfield & Co

Lighting product watch: Eltham Collection by Vaughan

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Lighting product watch: Eltham Collection by Vaughan

Vaughan has launched Eltham Collection, a selection of products, based on early 20th Century design…

Featuring four new table lamps, and five pieces of faux shagreen furniture, Eltham Collection continues Vaughan’s longstanding theme of creating products rooted in antiques, but then given a contemporary flair.

Lucy Vaughan, chairman and co-founder of Vaughan Designs, recalls how the collection came into existence: “From admiring my grandmother’s monogrammed boxes, to professionally taking an interest in my time as an antique dealer, shagreen has a particularly special place in my heart. Paired with the lights, it encapsulates all that I love about early 20th century design, with its emphasis on simplicity, purity of line and subtlety of form.”

The Eltham Collection includes :-

Hudson Table Lamp

A contemporary shape, reminiscent of American skyscrapers, this table lamp has an appealing crisp line to it. The decorative applied lines on the sides add a more ‘statement’ feel to the piece. The monumentality and decoration have an affinity to Axumite obelisks from 4th Century Ethiopia.

Wyndham Table Lamp

Based on an early 20th Century original, this vase is decorated with flowing swirl motifs to give it a wonderful textured feel. The non-uniform color adds a Modernist element to the aesthetic.

Shoreham Table Lamp

Based on an antique original, this playful design takes its inspiration from the work of the mid-20th Century. Its bright pop of color makes it a wonderful, statement piece.

Fairmont Table

A neat and satisfying design, this side table has a classic hexagonal shape to it, which is given a contemporary twist thanks to the addition of faux shagreen.

Vaughan is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email  Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Vaughan

Product watch: Facet lighting by Studio Waldemeyer

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: Facet lighting by Studio Waldemeyer

Hotel Designs learns how lighting designer Moritz Waldemeyer bent glass to its will in order to create FACET…

In all its beauty and variety, glass is essentially an amorphous material with no regular crystalline structure.

Yet through a design vision and mastery in glassmaking craft, the material can come to mimic its opposite, creating highly organised and consistent structures.

As if trying to systematise the chandelier-making tradition, Moritz took the geometrical shape of the Classic chandelier outline and turned it into a diamond-like hexagonal glass building block. On its own, with just single pendant, or in combination of multiple items into a large chandelier, the FACET modules stand out as clear, disciplined and geometrical.

The light source included inside every block allows the FACET system to be universal and almost unlimitedly extendable.

Moritz Waldemeyer is an internationally renowned London based designer who’s work occupies a diverse range of creative spaces. 2004 saw his debut into the design world with an interactive chandelier for Swarovski. With a forward thinking approach and a philosophy of playful experimentation Studio Moritz Waldemeyer is forging links between technology, art, fashion and design.

Led by Waldemeyer, the studio has taken on projects for Audi, Intercontinental Hotels, Rinacente and Wallpaper Magazines 2014 Handmade issue. Studio Moritz Waldemeyer has also created bespoke light studded costumes for Will.I.AM, Rihanna, Take That and the 2012 London Olympics handover Ceremony performers. Under Moritz’s direction the studio strive to create innovative concepts incorporating his signature aesthetic into each piece.

Studio Waldemeyer is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Studio Waldemeyer

“Fit is the new sexy,” and it’s here to stay in hospitality!

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
“Fit is the new sexy,” and it’s here to stay in hospitality!

In an exclusive editorial to celebrate the upcoming ‘WELLNESS’ concept coming to ‘ACCOR by Bergman Interiors, Hotel Designs takes a look at the future of wellness in hospitality…

A few years back, gyms were a place where you trained, lost weight or gained muscle. Today, gyms are part of our lifestyles. And with that lifestyle comes community. Whether the gym has a nightclub style with beaming lights, or is an industrial shell, we all seek a gym with the lifestyle and community that speak to us.

This lifestyle is getting us stronger, not just physically but also mentally – such an awakening calls for mind, body and soul.

Within the luxury market, wellness is not an expectation; it’s a dominant consumer value that is essential to the future hotel experience. This demand has inspired the collaboration between ACCOR and Bergman Interiors, in order to design wellness for tomorrow’s consumers.

Image credit: ACCOR

How hotels are changing regarding fitness in general?

Within the exercise world, fitness methods and training techniques have changed however these methods and concepts have been slow to be embraced within the hospitality industry.

What was once seen as an amenity for guests is being recognised as a key facility within luxury hospitality. 66 per cent of Gen X’ers say they actively participate in self-care to improve their physical wellbeing. What’s more, 76 per cent of millennials exercise at least once per week – exercise has become a vital part of our hotel customers lifestyle and our concepts need to meet this heightened expectation.

With this key demand in mind ACCOR has brought the fitness concept centre stage for the Pullman brand with our newly created Pullman Power Fit concept. Working with Bergman Interiors was a natural choice with their strong experience in creating innovative exercise and fitness concepts coupled with a depth of experience within luxury hospitality.

Image credit: ACCOR

Pullman Power Fitness replaces the stale one-size-fits-all hotel gym environment with a bold, artful, social approach to contemporary fitness. Pullman Power Fitness defines and explores our ambition to energise bodies and inspire minds. In-touch with today’s traveller and their fitness goals, we offer much more than a gym. We provide a community where guests can have fun while challenging themselves to take their performance to the next level within a stylised interior design, energetic branding and the latest on Video on Demand exercise technology.

A collaborative partnership with Bergman, the Pullman brand, Wellbeing and ACCOR design departments the concept was developed over 12 months and the result is a vibrant fitness space that makes a statement, beckons interaction, and energises the body while inspiring our guests. Our spaces and programming tap into an exciting new era of training diversity, integrated technology, and embracing the spirit of friendly competition.

Wellness mentally and physically?

“When it comes to wellness consumer research confirms a fundamental societal shift underway, feeling healthier as a lifestyle goal has well and truly entered the mainstream,” Albin Berglund, co-founder and managing director of Bergman Interiors, told Hotel Designs. “Because the modern luxury travellers of now- and the future- is on a journey: to find purposeful new travel experiences that speak to their inner self and to personal fulfilment. And they’re willing to pay a premium for it.”

Image credit: Engine Room

Broadly, we have defined five areas – nutrition, holistic design, movement, spa, and mindfulness – that we view as essential to the overall wellness experience within hospitality. We then customise the delivery and tactics in these areas to suit each brand and its unique guest preferences, demographics, psychographics, brand positioning, culture and locations.

Changes to wellness within the hotel industry after Covid-19

It is important to separate the temporary impact such as heightened sanitation measures, social distancing and impact on travel versus the longer term impact on consumer attitudes and behaviour.

Image credit: BXR

These push factors are the relentless pressures on our health, such as less physically active work, the prevalence of processed food, air quality concerns, light and noise pollution – all of which create malaise, illness and stress. Covid-19 has been a “super-accelerator” to these “push factors” globally, with a cross generational embrace of the need to invest in ones well being and a clear reminder of the benefit of leading a “preventative” lifestyle.

Then we have the pull factors. Wellness is a highly appealing touch point among consumers, a desirable draw that promises unique, enriching, relaxing experiences that help us define and express ourselves. Wellness helps us move away from the push factors and embrace the highly attractive lifestyle that is so integral to luxury hospitality and again this desire to combine wellness with travel will blossom.

In conclusion, we are expected to see an increase in the demand for healthy food within our restaurants, for outdoor exercise and access to nature, exercise will move from inside the gym to outside or a greater demand for in room or video driven options.

Main image credit: Bergman Interiors

Product watch: Maria Teresa chandelier by Masiero

740 565 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: Maria Teresa chandelier by Masiero

The Maria Teresa chandelier by Masiero is an iconic product that comes from Venice’s historical tradition and each piece is characterised by uniquely shaped crystal glass pendants…

The precious classical style of the Maria Teresa chandelier maintains its original, iconic look but adopts a new personality thanks to the fascinating creativity of colour and a varied range of lighting effects achieved by the latest control systems.

Image credit: Masiero

Each Masiero’s Maria Teresa is available in three different lighting technology: the classic, the Dynamic White LED that allows you to customise light temperature and the RGB_W Led that allows you to transform light in colours.

In Touquet Paris la plage, for its renovation, the Grand Hôtel Le Touquet specified the brand’s red Maria Teresa chandelier, made with Murano glass, as the decorative fulcrum of its atrium.
More recently, the bar of the Hotel, “Le Menko”, has been adorned with 10 black Maria Teresa chandeliers that gently illuminate the room and reinforce the Gatsby / art deco style of this new space.

Masiero is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Masiero

Case study: a bespoke approach to lighting two hotels

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Case study: a bespoke approach to lighting two hotels

To showcase Heathfield & Co’s bespoke approach to lighting design, Hotel Designs explores how the brand designed unique lighting schemes for two well-known hotels in London… 

From cruise ships and shared working spaces, to five star hotels and restaurants across the world, Heathfield & Co’s bespoke portfolio showcases more than 40 years of knowledge and experience in commercial projects. Here are just two examples that illuminate the brand’s creative approach to lighting.

The Curtain

Located in the heart of Shoreditch, The Curtain is a 120-key go-to for London creatives.

Starting with the client’s initial brief, Heathfield & Co’s bespoke team worked closely with U.S. based Duncan Miller Ulmann to design unique lighting to suit the sophisticated urban city aesthetic.

From an initial project review, through to final delivery and site support, Heathfield’s dedicated project managers led every stage of the process, ensuring the budget was met and final designs were perfectly executed.

Adjustable bedside wall lights, perforated ceiling pendants and picture desk lamps were among the bespoke products designed, developed and manufactured exclusively for this stylish hotel.

Kimpton Fitzroy

Combining contemporary interiors with the original features of its 19th century building, the Kimpton Fitzroy in Bloomsbury is a London hotel like no other.

Collaborating with the creative teams at Tara Bernerd and Russell Sage Studio, Heathfield’s dedicated team of product designers and engineers created a series of extravagant chandeliers and sleek wall lights to complement the hotel interior. Specialist finishes and materials were developed and produced for the project to achieve a truly unique design.

Heathfield Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here

Main image credit: Heathfield & Co

5 minutes with: the founders of Avenue Interior Design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
5 minutes with: the founders of Avenue Interior Design

Following the completion of a handful of luxury hospitality projects in the States, Avenue Interior Design has become known for its refusal to be defined by any one style, as editor Hamish Kilburn learns when he interviews the firm’s founders…

Avenue Interior Design, led by founders Andrea DeRosa and Ashley Manhan, has positioned itself as a small yet mighty powerhouse in an industry full of giants.

Most recently, the firm spearheaded the design for Palms Casino & Resort’ renovation ‘From Dust to Gold’, and brought their skills to boutique properties such as The Ramble in Denver, La Serena Villas in Palm Springs as well as SLS Baha Mar.

With the world of hospitality slowly re-opening, there remain concerns and hesitations among operators and travellers on what will become of the industry. I speak to DeRosa and Manhan, two level-headed designers who understand and respect how design evolves around cultural shifts, in order to explore how the pandemic has affected hotel design decisions.

Hamish Kilburn: Let’s dive straight in, how will public areas look in the post-pandemic world?

Ashley Manhan: Business and convention travel will likely lag compared to leisure travel as we see safer at home orders lift. Convention travel has been a critical component for many hotels as occupancy and F&B revenue are strongly tied to properties located near convention venues or for properties that have large meeting facilities.

A luxury F&B interior area with plants and cute seating

Image credit: SLS Baha Mar

Andrea DeRosa: Accommodating large groups and conventions may require smaller breakout rooms with improved air circulation and potentially live streaming speakers to these smaller rooms. On the F&B front, buffets and family-style plating will likely be put aside for individual plates or packaged meals.

HK: What new/different materials might go into hotel builds now?

AD: Given that COVID-19 transmission has found to be primarily airborne, much consideration is going into upgraded air filtration systems. Increased ventilation and better filtration will be essential components of healthy building strategies. Additionally, we may see the use of mobile and handled UV disinfection systems for sterilisation and disinfecting of high use spaces. In terms of interior finishes and materials, and those selected for FF&E, designers will face the added challenge of selecting materials that can withstand more frequent cleaning and disinfecting.

AM: In terms of lobbies, our current clients are requesting short-term solutions for partitions and countertop shields at transaction points, check-ins, and other places social distancing may not be feasible.

Fitness spaces will likely decrease in size- a trend for some properties already in major urban areas with access to specialised gyms and studios. Look for more in-room fitness options and equipment like yoga mats and lightweight dumbbells.

Restaurants face some of the largest obstacles in terms of social distancing and the use of PPE by diners. Restaurants will surely seat fewer guests to accommodate for social distancing protocol. Menus may go digital or restaurants may offer apps to place orders from your own device. Larger service counters for pickups or extended “grab and go” options maybe also be more prevalent as people warm up to the idea of eating out again.

Modern interior design in a clean open bar area

Image credit: SLS Baha Mar

AD: In the short term, we are seeing many hotel brands unrolling programs to build guest confidence and implementing quick, sometimes temporary solutions now while permanent solutions are analyzed and explored. Long term, we anticipate pandemic related measures to be modifiable to give operators the option of adjusting to meet current health risk levels. Such modifications may include digital occupancy signage, movable partitions, and digital projections indicating recommended social distances in queuing areas. A large part of the equation is understanding guests’ demands, expectations, and associations with these changes. There will certainly be varying levels of concern depending on where in the country/world the guest is traveling from. Those guests from the hardest-hit areas are likely to expect greater measures than those traveling from areas less affected. Ongoing observation of guest behavior will inform decisions owners and operators make for long term modifications to their properties.

HK: How can hotels shelter these new hygiene protocols without disrupting the design or the experience?

AM: Taking into consideration that guest safety and wellbeing is, and always has been, a top priority for any property, the next priority remains firmly rooted in good design. Ownership teams require that our commitment to creating a hospitality quality experience remains the top priority just as it was pre-pandemic. Modifications to properties should be subtle, flexible and well-intentioned. This includes careful consideration to the function of the space, the circulation of guests through the space as well as more obvious elements like materials, furnishings and even wayfinding. Creating more space for guests to comfortably, and naturally, socially distance may be as simple as removing a few clusters of lounge chairs in a lobby or replacing a communal table with a series of smaller, movable tables that can be situated individually or easily paired together.

AD: Incorporating decorative, movable screens or drapery also allows for social distancing flexibility while providing a thoughtful, well-designed element to the space. Graphics, signage, and font styles can be utilised in a way that provides informative guidance on precautions or protocol in a way that is consistent with the design language of the brand or property. For new build properties, especially food and beverage venues, you will likely see more fluid floor plans with fewer permanent features to allow for flexibility in furniture layouts and the function of a space.

A blue interior scheme inside a junior king room

Image credit: The Ramble Hotel

HK: Have you already begun incorporating any changes into the hospitality projects you’re working on?

AD: Many of the modifications we’ve made for our current projects have been temporary or short term solutions that will allow our clients to adhere to guidelines as outlined by local jurisdictions. Before making more costly or broad-sweeping modifications, our clients are waiting to gauge guests’ expectations and behaviours to ascertain what long term modifications should look like. For instance, the addition of automated faucets and hand soap dispensers seem like a logical move, however, for many properties that have been without revenue for the last few months, the expense of a modification requiring any construction or electrical work may be out of the budget. Scale is a monumental consideration as well. The cost of making such a change in a hotel with 50 keys is likely more feasible than making that change in a hotel with more than 1,000 keys.

HK: Have you made any changes to guestrooms in the projects you are working on?

AM: Guestroom size, function, and programming have also been a hot topic amongst designers and Ownership teams. In recent years the emphasis was on creating public spaces so dynamic and engaging it drew people out of their rooms and into the lobby, restaurant, bar, pool, etc. Guestroom sizes were generally shrinking and the furnishings were becoming paired down and multi-purpose in their design. It will be interesting to see if guestroom sizes increase to become more of a mini-sanctuaries that offer personalised guest experiences.

Hotel Designs will be discussing topics such as adding personality in public areas and reassuring the post-corona consumer at Hotel Designs LIVE on October 13. If you are a designer, architect or hotelier, click here to participate for free.

Main image credit: Avenue Interior Design

Case study: Bentley & Studio Waldemeyer’s fresh approach to lighting design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Case study: Bentley & Studio Waldemeyer’s fresh approach to lighting design

To celebrate its 100 year anniversary, Bentley Motors approached Studio Waldemeyer to help the brand create all aspects of illumination on the most sophisticated concept car in the company’s history…

The vehicle Bentley Motors showcased to mark its 100 anniversary displays the future of luxury craftsmanship with seamless fusion of materials and intelligent curation of technology, whilst introducing light as a new luxury material – all highly relevant when centering the focus back to lighting solutions for tomorrow’s hotels.

Bentley, which is a brand that has flirted with hotel design for many years with a handful of luxury hotel brands sheltering ‘Bentley Suites’, approached Studio Waldemeyer to join their design team and help design and engineer all aspects of illumination on the show car.

The car manufacturer’s challenging design brief required a completely new approach to light design and engineering. Studio Waldemeyer created an innovative tool chain, seamlessly merging the latest in parametric design tools from the world of computational architecture with electronic circuit design software. This approach not only allowed the perfect 3D integration of light in the complex surfaces of the car, but also the turnaround of the project in record time.

Close up of the centre console of the Bentley car

Image credit: Bentley Motors

The Bentley EXP 100 GT is by far the most complex and challenging project for Studio Waldemeyer up to date and represents the perfect combination of artistic expression and technical innovation the studio is know for.  Entering a new creative discipline the studio has yet again helped to raise the bar of innovation, in this case producing the most sophisticated illumination in the history of vehicle design.

Starting at the very prominent front grill, the illumination continues along the central spine into the interior space and finishes off with the sophisticated treatment of the rear horseshoe panel and 3D rear light clusters. While the approach to the project was that of a holistic 3D body of light, each area had its own challenges – be it the exotic materials, complex curvatures and the interaction with specialist design teams and craftspeople.

Attention to detail was paramount – the flying B logo required a weeks worth of hand polishing before receiving the tiny bespoke LED component that illuminates its wings. Different approaches were taken for every material – be it the hand woven silk or the 5000 year old river wood. The interior contains two hand blown crystal pieces that visualise the inner workings of the car’s AI. Collaborating closely with Cumbria Crystal, Studio Waldemeyer worked on the 3D design, implementation and illumination of this central feature.

The champagne cream interior with led lighting of the car

Image credit: Bentley Motors

The biggest research effort went into the external illumination. Starting from the sculpted surfaces of the car’s exterior, thousands of LEDs had to be placed at precise locations, requiring large numbers of different bespoke circuit board designs. This is a unique problem for an industry that is normally geared to make large numbers of a single design. Since no design tools existed for this task, the studio created their own: merging parametric 3D software with PCB design programmes. The manufacture of these unique pieces of electronics was done in Italy – a country famous for its long tradition in fine craftsmanship.

The concept car created a splash far beyond the automotive world and continues to receive praise in the press – garnering coverage in publications such as Wallpaper and Forbes – whilst collecting some of the most prestigious design awards in the process.

Studio Waldemeyer is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Studio Waldemeyer

PRODUCT WATCH: LED neon strip lighting in the spa

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
PRODUCT WATCH: LED neon strip lighting in the spa

To understand the creative possibilities and boundaries of lighting design, Hotel Designs asks Timage Architecture to share why LED neon strip lighting should be considered in the spa and wellness area…

We have long promoted the benefits of buying a marine-grade product for architectural application and have a dedicated Timage Architecture side to our business which focuses our product range for this specific audience.

The quality of materials and design consideration that goes into a product originally destined for yacht application is generally much greater than its architectural counterpart.  The materials not only offer a better overall aesthetic but also are very durable and can sustain a more aggressive installation environment.  These characteristics sit well with those looking to source sustainable product solutions for the hospitality sector.  Our products are more suited to clients looking to buy once, perhaps paying a small premium over an alternative product but being sure that they will not have to revisit the item once again after a season or two of use.

Nowhere in a hospitality setting is the above situation truer than in a spa.  The humidity levels, use of chemicals and temperatures can all culminate in poor product performance or failure, especially with regards to lighting.  Too often steam rooms have failed strip lighting under the seating or showers have fittings with a few diodes out.  These maintenance issues can have a negative impact upon the customer’s experience and overall perception of the spa.  Our marine-grade lighting can help resolve this problem, offering the hospitality sector a reliable and beautiful solution.

Our range of neon flexible LED strips is one of the best examples of these transferable products.  The neon strip lights are produced to the length required for each installation and the connectors are then injection moulded to ensure a safe IP68 underwater rating.  Lengths up to 20 metres can be specified if powered from both ends and a 24Vdc low voltage input makes them a safe product should any of the outer skin be breached.  The strips are available in a huge variety of colour temperatures as well as fixed colours.  In addition, RGB, RGBW and RGB pixel chasing versions can also be specified.  The RGBW models can be supplied in several white colour temperatures to sit alongside the coloured chips.  RGBW offers the ultimate flexibility for a lighting plan allowing the user to select custom blended colours or run colour sequences whilst still maintaining the option of a high-quality white light.  This year sees the addition of CCT technology or Correlated Colour Temperature to the range which allows users to adjust the strip from warm through to cool white at the touch of a button.  CCT is a great choice for spaces that may have a dual function requiring different ambient lighting styles or simply for those who like to tweak and change their lighting settings from time to time.

We have a large range of spa lighting solutions in addition to the neon strip lighting mentioned above and can supply luminaires for swimming pools, communal areas, shower enclosures and exterior zones.  Our lighting is always made from marine-grade materials and features the latest LED technology, rigorously tested for harsh environment application.  Please contact us for further product information or advice on spa lighting.

Timage is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Timage

Lighting & furniture: raw materials in extraordinary essentials

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Lighting & furniture: raw materials in extraordinary essentials

Buster + Punch’s love for working with rare, solid metals in lighting and furniture has led the brand to transform everyday functional fittings into extraordinary essentials…

From the light bulb, the dimmer switch and the pendant lamp, to the door handle and the cupboard knob, Buster + Punch has created an innovative collection of unexpected design details.

All of its hardware, lighting and accessories are made from solid metal and feature a signature diamond cut knurling. This ensures all our products can be paired within the space, creating a visual, and unified design throughout any space.

The lighting ranges are designed to work in harmony to create a smooth transition between spaces.

CAGED lighting takes a simple design and transforms it into a series of extraordinary building blocks. This light can be mounted as a wall or ceiling light and can work on its own in various rooms and spaces or in a linear procession for maximum impact, such as adding caged lights in a hotel hallway.

This all-time favourite classic Heavy Metal light features a single light pendant made from 450g solid metal and finished with a matt black rubber cord. A light that adds a refined touch in any room. Accent a single Heavy Metal light over a coffee table in a hotel room, or several Heavy Metal lights over a lounge.

Buster + Punch introduced the world to the beauty of cross-knurling and changed the way people felt about their forgotten home fittings. And in 2020 Buster + Punch launched LINEAR – a range of elegant, small-scale, cabinet handles inspired by fashion accessory hardware.

Diamond-milled from rare solid metals, the range features our new signature linear knurl pattern and machined torx screws.  LINEAR features new products such as the L-Bar and Precious Bar,  and new finishes Gun Metal and Burnt Steel. The hardware range can be fitted to a bedside table for a unique finish, on a dresser, or even a bathroom vanity.

Buster + Punch also launched a new door stop range featuring wall-mounted and floor-mounted door stops. The perfect final detail when entering and exiting a room. The signature diamond knurling can also be found, and comes in a range of finishes- brass, steel, smoked bronze, and brass.

Buster + Punch is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Buster + Punch

FEATURE: nautical lighting trends in 2020

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FEATURE: nautical lighting trends in 2020

On or off the water, lighting technology is evolving rapidly. Voltra Lighting explores this year’s most prominent nautical lighting trends…

Every summer, discerning guests seek out the thrill of sailing away on luxury vessels to explore breathtaking far-flung destinations around the world.

In order to meet the sky-high expectations of these jet-setters, yacht owners and luxury cruise liners invest in the most sophisticated decor elements from custom linen and drapes to designer furniture and premium cutlery. But, what is often forgotten is that to enhance your charter vessel’s interior design composition and experience, creative lighting schemes are a must.

That’s why designer lighting brands, such as Voltra Lighting, offer just the right visual and chromatic accents to enhance the look and feel of your stylish marine vessel. Crafted to deliver homogeneous illumination throughout the luxe spaces of yachts and superyachts, its hallmark design is sure to compliment your vision of hi-tech and intimate lighting.

According to designer and naval architect Adam Voorhees, “lighting plays such a critical role in how we understand a space..and how we can control and direct an experience in that space.” Mirroring this thought, especially over the last few years, superyacht lighting has grown to become an essential piece of the yacht design or refit process. From stunning chandeliers, wall lights, and decorative lamps to floor and furniture inlays, there are so many innovative solutions that are mushrooming when it comes to lighting up yachts.

If you are considering using high-end lighting to create the perfect atmosphere within the cabins and lounging areas of your yacht, then here are some upcoming trends to keep in mind:

  • Natural stone lamps: Unique and modish, lighting fixtures fabricated from naturally occurring rock are increasingly being considered a statement decor accessory. These lamps evenly illuminate the surroundings without dazzling the eyes; thus enabling guests to navigate safely over to the deck for a relaxed evening of stargazing.
  • Smart lighting: These intuitive and connected vessels of light are programmed to respond to movement, external environmental conditions, or direct user input; making for an advanced way to light spaces up.
  • Marine light sculptures: Many lighting designers, simply through creative placement, turn tasteful lighting fixtures into works of art. This ensures that the installation remains the focal point of the yacht’s interiors.
  • Charging bays: Particularly useful considering the space restrictions in private yachts, Voltra has bay chargers that charge up to eight lamps simultaneously. It is easy to put anywhere on a flat surface and requires only one power-point per bay.
  • LEDs grow in popularity: Not only are LEDs less sensitive to vibrations of the yacht but also incredibly flexible (can be adjusted to the mood or time of the day) and provide the same (or better) quality of light as incandescent lamps.

Iconically cordless

The right mood lighting can offer the perfect backdrop for a candlelight dinner or a late evening aperitif, on the front deck of your luxury boat. But most yachts and superyachts do not have wired electricity on the deck, upfront.

Enter the ambiance-setting manna from heaven – advanced cordless lighting.

Timeless both in form and function, Voltra’s range of portable lamps are excellent design objects for your yacht’s open-air spaces. Here are some of the many reasons why our portable lamps are found in some of the finest locations across the world:

  • Battery-powered: Voltra’s future-proof light installations are an incredibly customizable and intelligent way to incorporate lighting into any design project. Being battery-operated it does away with design limitations relating to the location of available electrical outlets.
  • Rated IP 65: No need to worry about damage due to water spit and harsh winds, as our lamps are incredibly dust and water-resistant. Voltra’s iconic range is also made from materials that are anti-corrosive in the face of high humidity.
  • Customisable lighting: Voltra’s exquisite lamps feature power, light modes, and the freedom to change lumières, placing the power in the hands of the guests to set the ambiance they prefer.
  • Adherence: All Voltra lights have a silicone border on the bottom, which ensures that they adhere to any surface. And since each of our handcrafted lamp units weighs upwards of a solid 609g, it is unlikely to “slide” or fall easily during oceanic turbulence.

Ultimately, be it a private yacht charter or a corporate event at sea, if you wish to create an intimate ambiance for your onboard guests, think Voltra cordless ambient lamps.

Voltra Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Voltra Lighting

PRODUCT WATCH: Chandelier by Buster + Punch

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PRODUCT WATCH: Chandelier by Buster + Punch

With lighting playing a vital role in all first impressions, Hotel Designs takes a closer look at the modern interpretation of Chandelier by Buster + Punch

Designers and architects are often willing to think outside the box in order to evoke a lasting first impression.

When it comes to lighting in public areas, however, often opting for a simple, clean and striking design scheme can make the brightest statement. A pendant chandelier, for example, will complement a modern and contemporary interior design style.

Chandelier by Buster + Punch is an eye-catching lighting display that can work in many lifestyle and luxury settings. Designers can choose from classic diamond or cascade formation, as well as a 19-pendant drop or a 31-pendant drop.

The dimmable lighting product aims to immediately set the tone by allowing users to personalise the brightness so that they can achieve the right ambience in all public areas. As well as the lobby and dining areas, designers may wish to add the pendent chandelier in the stairwell in order to add a new layer while acting as a decorative feature that also provides much needed functional lighting.

The bespoke heavy metal chandelier is a stylish LED light for large stairwell spaces or living areas.  The chandelier is teamed with the brand’s critically acclaimed LED Buster bulbs available in gold, smoked or crystal finishes. The brand’s heavy metal solid metal pendants are available in smoked, bronze, steel or brass.

Buster + Punch is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Buster + Punch

Lighting

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Human-centric lighting in hotels

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Human-centric lighting in hotels

Never has it been a better time for a new lighting brand with a plethora of experience and a fresh ethos to enter the international hotel design arena. Cue the launch of humanlumen

Lighting

Coronavirus has swept through the world causing a trail of destruction to everyday lives everywhere – how and where we work, live, play and learn has been reimagined on an unprecedented scale.

Wellbeing has been high on the agenda for a good few years now, and as the human race begins to emerge cautiously from lockdown, the health and safety of individuals will be even more critical.

Designers of the built environment have always built spaces for people to thrive and flourish however now it is more overt in the integration of biophilia through green walls, as well as the technology enabled tuneable lighting which can impact on the circadian rhythm of humans.

As we all begin to inhabit public spaces such as airports and hotels once again, I believe that customers will increasingly seek experiences that have their wellbeing at heart. Increased assurance that operators are adhering to the highest standards of hygiene for example and the guarantee of todays most valuable asset in the health currency right now  – sleep.

Jet lag can be a debilitating condition for frequent flyers but imagine if the lighting in your hotel room could accelerate the adjustment to a new time zone?

This is how it would work: as you enter your hotel room, your key card tells the control system where you have arrived from and the lights then change to the ideal colour temperature to adjust your body to the new time zone. The lighting prescribed by the system would differ depending on where in the world you were, and where you had travelled from.

For example, if you are travelling east from London across more than eight time zones, you need to avoid morning light and actively seek out afternoon light for the first three or four days because dusk light delays the circadian clock, while morning light advances it.

There is an increasing body of evidence to suggest that the right light – at the right time – can stabilise hormonal rhythms, enhance night-time melatonin secretion, improve sleep quality, increase day-time vigilance and raise our resilience to stress.

The rule of thumb for alertness is that 30 minutes before you want to go to bed, you should minimise light exposure. But what’s the last thing most of us do before we go to bed? We stand in the most brightly lit room, the bathroom, looking into the mirror cleaning our teeth! A dial by the bathroom mirror which could change the lighting from blue-enriched to red-enriched before you go to bed, may help many of us sleep far more soundly.

Human centric lighting: benefits for hotels

The human-centric lighting system has plenty of benefits which hotels and restaurants.

Helps in Setting the Mood

The ideal lighting temperature and colour is very subjective, using HCL the lighting experience can be customised.

With the human-centric lighting system, you can easily adjust the brightness level of lights as per your every customer needs and offer a comfortable experience to everyone.

Cost-Effective 

HCL is incredibly energy-efficient, light is focused around where the user is and will automatically shut off and on when sensors detect human presence around them.

Stimulating environment

HCL allows for the creation of stimulating environments for all guests, operators can design bespoke decorative and ambient settings in accordance with the mood of customers.

Increase Productivity 

Conclusion: lighting has a well-documented impact on productivity, which hotel owners and staff can benefit from.

Humanlumen, which is based in Clerkenwell, is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: I-Stock

The Flame of mori.london by Studio Waldemeyer

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The Flame of mori.london by Studio Waldemeyer

Lighting expert Mortiz Waldemeyer’s innovative collection was born from the simple act of playing with fire. Hotel Designs learns more…

As far back as the collective memory of mankind goes, the flame has been the first and only light source, guiding our ancestors through history from the moment we dared to differentiate ourselves from the animal kingdom. The fascination with the movement and warmth of this light source is hardwired into our brains thanks to millions of years of this most special of relationships. The advent of electric light has done nothing to diminish our love for candle light, if anything it has helped to emphasise, just how special it’s effect is to us.

A few years back a playful experiment with a small LED matrix at Studio Waldemeyer produced a surprising result. Despite it’s very low resolution, the digital circuit managed to perfectly reproduce the complex motion of a flame. But the surprise was less in the technical ability but in people’s response to it. As if by magic we had captured the essence of everything a flame means, and added some intrigue. The tiny circuit had its own soul and captured peoples imagination unlike anything we had created up to this point or since.

After an encouraging debut with Ingo Maurer, London based Studio Waldemeyer launched their own brand mori.london on Kickstarter in 2017 while simultaneously showing the new line during Milan Design Week.

Studio Waldemeyer

Image credit: Studio Waldemeyer

mori.london sets out to define a completely new category of LED lighting: playful, emotional, atmospheric and elegant, always innovative and always low power and low impact on the environment. mori.london creates the perfect balance of beautifully crafted objects with a sprinkling of tech. We use inspiration from the past to re-invent the future.

The response to the concept has been incredible: thumbs up from design heroes     such as Ingo Maurer, Philippe Starck and Tom Dixon and a place in MoMA’s permanent collection. The London Design Museum shows the history of light inventions starting with Edison’s light bulb and finishing with the mori.london LED candle.

The versatility of the concept perfectly lends itself to beautiful bespoke installations. Bicester village trusted Studio Waldemeyer two years in a row with gigantic Christmas installations based on LED flames. Thousands of oil lamps and flying lanterns magically transformed their UK, French and German retail villages.

Nobu Hotel’s minimalist Christmas tree made it onto every single list of London’s best Christmas trees in 2018 while mori.london chandeliers started appearing at Rossana Orlandi Gallery during Milan design week.

Studio Waldemeyer

Image Credit: Studio Waldemeyer

The product range is growing further, currently, new wall lights and XL flames are in the works with higher resolution and more detailed animation, while the studio has taken on new commissions of the largest installations yet to be seen.

Studio Waldemeyer is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Studio Waldemeyer

Lighting design: guests’ demands come first

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Lighting design: guests’ demands come first

Following the industry emerging from the pandemic, lighting brand Franklite explains how guests are at the heart as the hospitality industry enters unchartered waters…

It’s important to understand how the right light can be used in different environments. For instance, in a hotel, light can be used to create an ambience and welcoming feel when paired with the right decor and natural light.

The right light can create a warm and friendly atmosphere; however, the wrong light can easily detract from a nicely decorated room.

Lighting in hotels should be installed with guests at the heart. The entire guest experience starts as soon as you arrive at the front desk of a hotel. If you are arriving late at night, the lighting should be warm and welcoming, helping you to feel relaxed and comforted. This is in contrast to when arriving in the morning, where there should be plenty of daylight or if not possible, bright white lighting, to help you feel energised and awake.

Image credit: Franklite

It’s important to make the best use of light in each space, to create a relaxing atmosphere throughout the entire hotel. For example, the lighting in the restaurant will require different lighting at different times of the day. During the day, where natural light changes are more noticeable, different scenes make it easy to adapt and maintain the right light level. At night, the lighting may be needed to assist in creating a romantic setting.

Understanding these nuances has been the key to Franklite’s success, having manufactured and distributed decorative lighting products from our purpose-built premises for more than 45 years. The brand is renowned, both in the U.K. and abroad, for the quality and versatility of its lighting, a reputation built on using only the finest components in the manufacturing process.

The lighting brand has evolved into a company offering a diverse range of decorative LED lighting products for both interior and exterior, domestic and contract applications, including all areas of hospitality and especially in hotels.

Franklite was one of the first manufacturers of energy saving chandeliers within the U.K. lighting industry. The brand understands the importance of keeping up to date with changes in regulation, the development of super-efficient light sources, and changing interior design trends.

Along with its constantly updated catalogue range, Franklite is able to offer bespoke LED lighting solutions for special projects, ensuring your design is ahead of the game and adding that ‘WOW’ factor when required. The company has dedicated contract sales and technical teams with many years of experience in lighting to assist with all your requirements.

If you would like any assistance or advice on using our products in your next project, please contact us on 01908 691818 or visit the website.

Main image credit: Franklite

 

CASE STUDY: a bespoke lighting scheme for The St. Regis Venice

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: a bespoke lighting scheme for The St. Regis Venice

Bespoke lighting solution provider Inspired by Design was approached by interior design firm Sagrada to assist in sourcing lighting for just under 200 guestrooms and suites inside The St Regis Venice…

The St Regis Venice, designed by London-based design firm Sagrada, captures unmatched vistas that stretch over the building’s luxurious gardens, as well as the Grand Canal.

When it came to lighting, here’s how the designers created the appropriate ambiance in both the public areas and guestrooms.

“It was a difficult project to achieve as it required our extensive knowledge of manufacturers worldwide to produce a bespoke floor light reminiscent of the 1950s,” explains Simon Shuck from Inspired by Design. “As always, we rose to the challenge and found a factory that still had the molds available.” The factory then provided sample finishes with slightly colour variation to ensure we could match the clients exacting finishes. To finish the floorlight there was a shade manufactured to the interior designers choice of fabric and detailing.

However, the involvement did not stop there.

The next item was to produce a bespoke triptych mirror for the bathrooms. It had an exquisite sandblasted detailing to be produced on either side, backlit and to a very specific size and shape. The factory worked closely with the design team as numerous drawings and revisions were made until all the finer details of their designs were achieved before the triptych went into production.

Image credit: St Regis Venice/Marriott Hotels

Within the nearly 200 guestrooms and suites, the company’s expertise was tested again to produce both the bedside and vanity pendants . These required a facetted design to the glass, produced by Venetian master glass blowers to replicate the ceiling details. At the same time the faceting enabled the light to to cast a shadow onto the headboards to mimic the detailing on the ceiling and drapes.

Many samples had to be produced to ensure that the overall design intent would be achieved and as always the Venetian artisans lived up to their reputation.

The completed lighting creates a perfect ambience in the guestrooms, which compliments the history of the building. Shuck adds: “We are confident that when the guests arrive into their room they will be greeted by a beautifully and tastefully designed bedroom creating a luxurious stay in a very relaxed atmosphere.”

Inspired By Design is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here

Main image credit: St Regis Venice/Marriott Hotels

TREND ALERT: Natural stone in hotel design lighting

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
TREND ALERT: Natural stone in hotel design lighting

With designers and architects looking for new innovative ways in which to inject biophilic design, Voltra Lighting takes a look at beneficial properties of natural stone…

Cappadocia, an ancient district in Turkey, never fails to capture the imagination of discerning travellers with its high-end rock-cut hotels that exude pure elegance and character. Everything from the hotel fireplace to floating shelves and even the bathroom fittings tend to transport visitors into the lap of luxury, by virtue of being carved out of timeless and all-natural stone.

Be it luxe beach stays in Greece or heritage hotels in India, there are many such examples where floor-to-ceiling natural stone designs add a distinctly tasteful texture to the interiors. So much so that avant-garde designers are increasingly considering richly patterned accent walls of stone to be works of art in itself; doing away with the need for additional wall hangings and paintings.

Oftentimes, even a few accent pieces fashioned from natural stone can transform ordinary spaces into extraordinary interior marvels. One such decor essential is the precision-cut alabaster lamp by luxury cordless lighting brand Voltra. This vessel of light is designed to create an ambience of heightened intimacy and sophistication.

The allure of natural stone explained

Hotels can choose to adorn their interiors with the likes of stylish Italian marble, delicately polished granite, or beautifully layered slate – each of which has an inherently unique appeal.

But, here are the features that make natural stone decor elements universally captivating:

Sustainable: Luxury hotel properties that have an environmentally conscious bent will find ethically sourced natural stone decor pieces to be great for the triple-bottom-line – being extremely recyclable and fabricated in a zero-waste industry.

Classic and timeless: At a time when trends and forecasts dominate, handmade stone decor pieces will always be an elegant choice. Especially when it’s just the right balance between design and craft, stone is perfectly suited for both traditional and contemporary decor themes.

Easy to maintain: Being able to resist rot, mold, extreme temperatures and water damage, makes natural stone particularly great for high-end bathrooms, outdoor spaces and kitchens.

Incredibly durable: Trust mother nature to produce some of the most resilient and exquisite building materials there is. Classy natural stones materials such as granite and quartz are known for their durability and longevity.

Unique: Just like a snowflake, the intricate designs and colors of no two stones occurring in nature can ever be exactly alike. You may choose from variants that have delicate golden sparkles, different colors, subtle textures and complex veins. This natural diversity of form makes it possible for you to design your hotel interiors to be exclusive and distinctive.

Keeping it trendy with natural stone

The versatility of natural stone has ensured that it remains a symbol of luxury and refinement for decades now. To help your hotel interiors to stand out from the crowd, here are the latest stone-based trends for 2020:

Source local: Hotels in Brazil can use local quartz, those in Italy can choose Calacatta marble, while Lundhs Larvikite can be the stone of choice for Norwegian properties. These indigenous stone varieties, if used with vernacular architecture as inspiration, will not only tick the sustainability box but really add to the cultural richness of your space.

Super-size the tiles: The latest trend is to have large tiles, on flooring, walls or even centre tables; at sizes starting from 60x60cms. This is ideal for creating that modern, sleek look.

Experiment with stone statement pieces: Eye-catching yet understated designs of table lamps, showerheads and planters, made of natural stone, can establish tasteful imagery. Even one exquisite stone art installation can help create a one-of-a-kind look for your interiors.

Luxuriously distressed: Gone are the days when the stone had to be polished to be ready. Nowadays, a well-worn rustic look is in vogue. These distressed materials, with stunningly life-like details, are a classic choice to really suit your garden and outdoor design.

Aim for earthy vibes: Natural stone intimately connects your interiors with nature and the earth to generate versatile and old-fashioned opulence. Unify your decor by pairing your stone decor feature with plants, soil, wood, water and fire.

Voltra Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Voltra Lighting

Lighting Case Study: Designing The Bristol

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Lighting Case Study: Designing The Bristol

The 65-key hotel The Bristol, designed by Earl Swensson Associates (ESa), has a unique lighting story that includes specified pendants and chandeliers by Hudson Valley Lighting Group

The Bristol was born in 2015 when a commercial office building with historical character was marked for demolition. The Charlestowne Hotels group acquired it, hiring ESa (Earl Swensson Associates) to redesign and restore it, developing the eight-story brick building into a 65-key hotel.

Bristol is a town on the border of Virginia and Tennessee, and is commonly recognised as the birth place of country music: In 1927, Ralph Peer of Victor Records went out there to record some folks by the names of The Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers. The rest is history. That’s why the address of the The Bristol is 510 Birthplace of Country Music Way. With such an eclectic location and history, The Bristol was going to have to incorporate those influences into its design.

Luxury lighting in a residential style suite

Image credit: The Bristol Hotel/HVLG

The designers from ESa gathered together various pictures and mood boards that evoked the look and feel they were hoping to achieve and shared them with their HVLG source. The brand’s dedicated contract and hospitality representative in the area had a long-standing relationship with the lead designers, as well as a deep familiarity with the product.

As one of the standard products selected, Hudson Valley Lighting’s Humphrey pendants and chandeliers adorn many of the rooms. HVL’s contemporary classic feel meant these fixtures look as at home in the brand new rooms as they may have in the flourishing Art Deco period when the building was first constructed. Providing the ambient layer of light, these exquisite fixtures also contributed to a higher level of decorative sophistication for the space.

Corbett fixtures also enhance visitors’ experience; with their impressive scale and hand-applied leaf finishes, which the brand often says of its Corbett pieces that they have to be seen in person to be believed.

Additionally, the HVLG Contract Custom team got to work on designing a few special pieces, such as pendants for The Bristol’s awesome rooftop hangout, chandeliers for its banquet room, and a series of sconces for its conference room area. ESa reviewed initial drafts of the designs and made some adjustments. Once they were completely happy with the plan, the lighting brand proceeded to build these one-of-a-kind fixtures on time and on budget.

Sitting eight stories up in a town without a lot of high-elevation buidings, The Bristol’s special rooftop relaxation zone, Lumac, has a beautiful view of the surrounding environs — the painted brick sides of old buildings, the nearby hills, twinkling downtown lights, and the town’s charming entry gate. Originally built in the twenties, the whole thing feels almost like something out of a Baz Luhrmann film, with a distinct slice of heartwarming Americana. HVLG designed a custom outdoor pendant for this beautiful rooftop bar area, adding to its singular charm.

The Bristol Hotel is a good example of how HVLG can be your one-stop shop for a hospitality lighting project. Combining world-class standard product from across its four distinct brands (Corbett and Hudson Valley in this case) with custom pieces, the lighting specialists were able to satisfy this project’s requirements while providing lighting that elevated the environment.

Hudson Valley Lighting Group is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Hudson Valley Lighting Group

IN PICTURES: OKKO Hotels’ new design-led guestroom concept

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IN PICTURES: OKKO Hotels’ new design-led guestroom concept

On July of 2019, in the heart of Paris, along the platform No. 2 at Gare de l’Est, OKKO Hotels unveiled its second generation guestroom concept, designed by Studio Catoir, which chose two models from the Ligne Roset Contract collection as testimonies of a strongly claimed design ambition…

The concept of OKKO Hotels’ second generation guestroom is adapted to the use for a single person, as well as the use for a couple. Concretely, this means separated toilets, more storage space and redesigned ergonomics. The sleeping area has also been re-thought. Many changes had been made in line with sustainable development: choice of materials, implementation of sorting and recycling, use of water fountains. The wish to use natural materials, sometimes raw materials, has been kept. The idea of integrating the codes of interior design into hotel language also remains, by the choice of iconic pieces that are no longer used to being discovered in a nice apartment or a hotel. The choice of the Andrey lamp, design by the Studio Catoir and edited by Ligne Roset, with it design all in finesse and elegance is a great example.

Like most of the international luxury brands, the history of Ligne Roset is rooted in the French craft heritage. In 160 years, the brand has become the symbol of an elegance if life, the imprint of a luxury signed by the greatest contemporary design talents around the world. Ligne Roset, the leading creator-manufacturer-distributor of contemporary French furniture showcases nowdays a whole art of living through its full collection of seats, cabinet, decorative items, lightings, rugs, fabrics and know how to decline, adapt and blend in the bespoke décor imagined by architects and interior designers. It is the expertise of Ligne Roset Contract which is expressed today in the drawings of the Studio Catoir for Okko Hotels. For Okko Hotels, collaborating with a French brands which has an expertise that brilliantly combines craftsmanship and technicality is a strong guarantee of quality.

You will find in the bedrooms the Audrey light, the Rocher chair and Nubo desk.

The hats of the actress Audrey Hepburn inspired Studio Catoir for this lamp which combines great sophistication and resolutely design. A true piece of design, which brings a touch of refinement to the sleeping area of the hotel bedroom.

Image credit: Ligne Roset/OKKO Hotels

Iconic piece by the Berlin duo Hertel & Klarhoefer, manufactured by Ligne Roset, the chair Rocher adopts a fractal design, characterised by a faceted construction. The surface of the shell (seat / back and armrests) seems cut like a diamond. On four white lacquered legs, it brings a feeling of lightness as well as comfort and elegantly complements the office space.

With Nubo, designed by GamFratesi, aesthetic astonishment is provided by the unexpected meeting of the ‘déjà vu’ and a surprising new element: the simple spacesaving wall shelf metamorphoses into a treasure box, evocative of a suitcase such as the Air France blue fabric travelling case of the 1960s. Its rounded cloud shape and luminous yet warm association of natural oak and sky blue wool fabric also fall into the same vintage Scandinavian register.

Ligne Roset is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Ligne Roset/OKKO Hotels

CASE STUDY: Lighting The Hoxton Southwark

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: Lighting The Hoxton Southwark

A stone’s throw from the River Thames and London’s South Bank, the Hoxton Southwark opened its doors in September last year. The design team at Ennismore specified lighting products from Heathfield & Co to create a vibrant interior design scheme…

Hoxton Southwark, which opened last year, became the eighth property in the brand’s series.

The new-build hotel contains 192 rooms, various meeting and events spaces, and its two popular restaurants; Albie, an all-day dining spot and Seabird, a rooftop seafood restaurant with spectacular views across the capital.

Alongside owners Ennismore, Heathfield & Co’s experienced team of project managers, product designers and engineers worked on this incredible project for a year, supplying bespoke lighting across the hotel’s public areas. Aimed at creating a vibrant and welcoming space, the clients brief included vintage references and classic styles, which the team designed, developed and manufactured, resulting in 22 completely bespoke pieces, from table lamps and wall lights, to multiple ceiling fittings and pendants.

Unique materials and specialist finishes come together in the production of this beautiful collection of bespoke lighting, each manufactured and assembled in Heathfield’s UK warehouse. A custom brass finish created specifically for the project will organically develop over time, harnessing the natural antiquing process.

Heathfield Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here

Main image credit: Hoxton Southwark/Ennismore

 

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: The ‘anything is possible’ approach in interior design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: The ‘anything is possible’ approach in interior design

Timothy Oulton is a British designer who has mastered the ‘anything is possible’ approach greater than most when it comes to interior and product design. Hotel Designs gets comfortable in the Apollo to learn its secrets… 

Nothing epitomises the ‘anything is possible’ ethos that Timothy Oulton Studio is famous for better than Apollo.

It is a unique environment modelled to scale on the Apollo 11 spacecraft, encapsulated in a polished stainless steel shell and featuring luxurious, fully customisable interiors created in-house and by hand by the brand’s skilled cohort of makers and craftspeople.

Image caption: Apollo by Timothy Oulton Studio

Recent research points to just 16 per cent of holiday goers now considering trips abroad, yet the urge to escape the new normal is a powerful force. For the luxury and ultra-luxury hotelier the question of how best to create an experience capable of satisfying this desire, wherever in the world, is more pertinent than ever.

As a commercial interior design studio serving the hotel and hospitality industry, this question is one the Timothy Oulton Studio team has considered from its own perspective. Since the global Covid-19 pandemic took hold, studio founders Timothy Oulton and Simon Laws have been asking themselves what the changed future looks like for a market as vital as the travel and hospitality industry, and for the individual businesses that operate within it.

“Marry the impulse to be transported to another world with a sensitivity to the needs of this one.”

The practice is responsible for delivering unforgettable design concepts that enable its clients to attract, engage and wow visitors – impacting revenue streams by offering unmatched experiences. A potential answer to the question of what next? Marry the impulse to be transported to another world with a sensitivity to the needs of this one. 

An outdoor iteration of the Apollo is something Timothy Oulton Studio has been asked for on numerous occasions. Now, after a year of research, development and prototyping, it is ready to be bought to market and – when the ability to be outdoors in small numbers holds great influence over decisions about where we go and how – the launch seems appropriately timed.

“A design like Apollo can pivot existing businesses in so many ways.”  – Simon Laws, co-founder, Timothy Oulton Studio

For hotels with surrounding land or existing glamping facilities the outdoor Apollo creates a phenomenal point of difference in the luxury market, while larger businesses can use it is an attention-grabbing centrepiece inside or out. At Gordon Ramsey’s Bread Street Kitchen the Apollo is used as a private dining space, enabling small group to drink and eat separately within the buzzy atmosphere of the wider restaurant – this is something that the studio team is expecting more of, as Laws explains. “Now more than ever people want to get away, both physically and metaphorically, and I think perhaps hoteliers are seeing an opportunity to facilitate that for people within their own countries, removing the need to jump on a plane,” he says. “A design like Apollo can pivot existing businesses in so many ways. 

“Being so unique and visually impactful also helps clients understand the value of this particular design – Instagrammability is front of mind for almost everyone in the industry. If it was prevalent before the pandemic it can only be more so now our circumstances have changed and we are out and about less frequently. You only have to take a glance at the breadstreetkitchen hashtag to see what a difference this kind of design makes to the popularity of a business.”

The Apollo can be viewed and bought at Timothy Oulton, Bluebird, 350 King’s Rd, Chelsea, London SW3 5UU.

Timothy Oulton Studio is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here

Main image credit: Timothy Oulton Studio/Image caption: Apollo by Timothy Oulton Studio

Exploring what makes design unique through the rich theatre of life

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Exploring what makes design unique through the rich theatre of life

With ‘Finding your lane’ being a topic that Hotel Designs will explore in the first episode of DESIGNPOD, we asked Samantha Crockett, Director of Harris Jackson Interior Design Studio, what makes her design unique…

Very recently an acquaintance of mine Jacqueline Goddard of Atticus Arts wrote an article for her blog & LinkedIn asking, “What was our USP?”.

It struck a chord with me as, while in lockdown, I have been trying to find a way to differentiate myself from other small Hospitality design studios out there.

What makes me unique in an industry that is saturated by designers that have been through the design school/University system? What can I offer my client that makes me differ from all the rest?

Jacqueline states: “What differentiates us from another is our life’s experiences”. Undoubtedly these experiences will be unique to every individual.  My instinct is that no client can decide whether they want to take on my services unless they can resonate with what I have to say. And by that, I mean, what is behind my passion for hospitality design? Why do I do what I do and how did I get here? What makes me? What makes me an informed designer that will create & inspire. Why should a hotelier approach me to design their hotel, members club, Golf club, show home to name but a few?

Firstly, my love on interiors and design stems back to when as a young child l would build Lego models of my ideal home which then shifted into creating my own interior design projects in sketchbooks, tracing textile designs from Colefax & Fowler and drawing differing scales of pattern to place into a space. This was usually my then minuscule bedroom in my family home in West London. I constantly had my head in a sketchbook drawing and sketching what I saw around me. I wish to this day I had the time to still do this.

However, alongside this love of anything design related was my passion for live performance, theatrical arts and film. I would devour the old black and white films from “To kill a Mockingbird “ to “12 Angry men” to Some like it hot”. I would sing and dance & memorise all the routines from the Hollywood film musicals such as “Oklahoma”, “Oliver “& “Cabaret”. My family would spend spectacular evenings in London to see the latest big musical show that had hit the West End. Even to this day I remember the feeling of excitement as, sitting on those plush red velvet seats, the lights dimmed, and the curtains drew back to reveal stunning sets and characters while the orchestra launched into their overture. Those days of peering over the seat in front, chin resting on hands, stays with me to this day.  That feeling of need to distance my actual surroundings and the story unfolding and the sheer joy that was beheld in that proscenium arch in front of me.

With a mother & grandmother, ballerinas in large scale Ballet productions pre and post war Europe accompanying Anna Pavlova & several other family members working as empresarios, my love of theatre and spectacle was entrenched in my psyche.

Rather than follow the traditional route into Interior design by studying at University or one of the established private schools such as KLC or Inchbald. I followed my heart by studying Set & Costume design combining my 2 passions design & theatre. Whilst studying, my Saturdays were spent working my way round every department of what was then Terence Conran’s Habitat. The interiors bug re-awakened.

What my studies taught me was that at every moment theatrical design has to resonate with the audience, to create an emotional reaction, depict a story, which in turn allowed for a longstanding memory. We had to work with the script to develop the character through setting, costume, texture, colour, sound & light. Create the world in which these characters lived & breathed. I can still recall so many details of the sets from the various productions I saw through the 80’s & 90’s down to the intricate detailing in the handmade period or contemporary costumes created for individual characters. My professional career took me to the worlds of Cole Porter & Bob Fosse musicals as well as French restoration comedies through to 1950’s American comedic theatre. They all have contributed over the years to this wealth of reference and the attention to detail stands me in good stead to this day when specifying the FF&E for projects I have worked and collaborated on.

Theatre is all about working as a team, it is a collaboration. One cannot work without the other. Just like in hospitality interiors. The designer cannot create without the client, the brand, the contractors and ultimately without the final experience that the hotelier/group want to impact on the guest. I learnt how to deal with personalities from directors to lead actors recently moved over from LA to tread the boards after decades of Hollywood film work. One cannot underrate the nerves that even the highest paid performers experience when stepping out onto that stage again. We had to reassure, understand & above all, listen. A skill often forgotten.

So, in hotel design how can we create these memories & experiences that will last a lifetime inspiring the guest to come back for more and how do we translate them into the hotel interior? We, the designer, have to tap into that unseen, sometimes un-describable reaction that we get from a given environment, location or atmosphere. Once we have succeeded, we are creating long lasting memories for hundreds of end users who we hope to entice back for another unforgettable stay.

Image caption: The Clubhouse Shanghai

Not only was my background in design and theatre a pre-cursor to my now passion for hospitality environments. But after graduating a stint in the Sales & marketing of luxury interior products instilled me with a desire to keep learning about innovative products & manufacturing. I learnt about the procurement process, what can be achieved by working alongside suppliers, manufacturers & crafts people to create a given look within a budget. It taught me how to design beautifully bespoke details that run through my work today. A move into Interior design in the early 00’s brought a number of years designing high end residential interiors, but it was always the hotels that drew my attention.

Image caption: The lobby inside St Regis Dubai

With this product knowledge came a sound sense of style and design history. I can be given any brief placed throughout time and place and produce an interior that demonstrates both a correct historical reference point but also empathy. Just imagine walking into a Lobby area where the whole effect takes your breath away! This is not just interior design but pure theatre!

One cannot realistically expect to understand what the client wants in a brand/Interior unless you understand human emotion, desires, ambitions, history, religion and culture. I often write about how important the locality and community are for a boutique hotel brand. Maximising on what is local to the property both geographically and naturally as well as culturally. My many travels and experience of living and working both in the Middle East (Dubai) and Asia (Hong Kong) have introduced me to many distinct and different design styles and cultures. How can I design an authentic space if I have no point of reference? How will my design be believed or resonate with the guest if I have not travelled to or experienced the culture? While designing luxury hotels across Asia I was called on to draw on my expertise in classical European interiors & architecture for a palatial project in Dubai. Whether right or wrong it was my heritage and European education that benefited this collaboration.

Image caption: Conclusion? This is me!

So, when considering what is “my” USP within this exceptional industry and what makes me distinctive, I quote another acquaintance Clare Farthing, business strategy coach, who I have had the pleasure of working with over the last few years: “You are your business”. My USP is my life’s journey and everything that is encompassed within that. No other individual will build on the same training, life experiences and responses. So, when I look back at what I have accomplished it is definitely with a sense of uniqueness that I am what I am and bring to the table a “rich theatre of life”.

Harris Jackson Design is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Harris Jackson Design

Hotel Designs LIVE: Technology’s role in tomorrow’s hotel with Jason Bradbury

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Hotel Designs LIVE: Technology’s role in tomorrow’s hotel with Jason Bradbury

On June 23, Hotel Designs hosted its first ever virtual conference. To kickstart Hotel Designs LIVE, sponsored by Technological Innovations Group, editor Hamish Kilburn welcomed tech influencer and the former presenter of The Gadget Show Jason Bradbury to discuss technology’s role in tomorrow’s hotel…

Following a warm welcome from editor Hamish Kilburn to officially launch Hotel Designs LIVE – and quick-fire Q&A round with the event’s headline partner, Technological Innovations Group – Jason Bradbury made a dramatic entrance, on a hover board (we wouldn’t expect anything less). The former presenter of The Gadget Show, who has built an international career as a futurology and tech-trends corporate speaker, took the microphone to start the conference’s debut session entitled: Technology’s role in tomorrow’s hotel.

“The last 10 weeks have defined the next 10 years of innovation.” – Jason Bradbury

Sponsored by Hamilton Litestat, the session started by Bradbury suggesting that the current coronavirus crisis  – and indeed all cultural changes in the past – opened up an opportunity for new technology to be utilised in the hotel experience. Using the case study of Bainland Park, which is a luxury escape just a few miles from his home in Lincoln, Bradbury explained how the resort is redesigning its concept to dissolve the conventional public areas altogether. “Bainland Park is completely self-sufficient, ideal for the post-corona consumer, and the architecture and design really does set the scene,” he said. “Before lockdown, the owners were intending to renovate the public areas. However, as a result of the pandemic, and the change of consumer demands, they are now eliminating the the communal areas completely. What’s most interesting is that this change has been driven in the last 10 weeks alone.”

“Technology that offer peace of mind and wellbeing are going to be central to the buying experience from consumers.” – Jason Bradbury

Another case study that Bradbury referred to when predicting technology’s role in the future hotel experience was Eccleston Square, a tech-savvy  boutique gem that sits in the heart of London. With the aim being to understand where technology is heading in hotel design, in 2019, Hotel Designs asked Bradbury to review the hotel 30 years in the future. “The technology in Eccleston Square is almost invisible, if you exclude the media lounge,” he explained, “which results in a seamless experience for the guests. However, post-pandemic, I wonder if in the future we are going to see more overt instances of technology [when it comes to cleaning], because that will make us feel safer as consumers.

During the seminar, Hotel Designs LIVE featured a PRODUCT WATCH segment, which allowed the audience to hear from key-industry suppliers within within the technology sphere to ultimately find out about the latest innovations and products that have appeared on the hotel design scene recently.

Below is the full seminar (in two parts), with PRODUCT WATCH pitches from Hamilton Litestat, Technological Innovations Group, NT Security, Air Revive and Aqualisa.

In part two (see below), Bradbury continued to explore, through technology lenses, what he believes will likely be the hotel of the future. In addition, he answered some tough questions on which piece of technology he believes should never have been invited, what tech item he simply cannot live without and how long he could go living without technology…

Born in the chaotic realms of the coronavirus crisis, Hotel Designs LIVE, sponsored by Technology Innovations Group, is Hotel Designs’ way to simply, meaningfully and virtually keep the industry connected while keeping the conversation flowing. Bradbury’s future-gazing session, where he predicted technology’s evolution in the hotel experience, kickstarted a full day of insightful talks and panel discussions on topics such as Public Areas, Sleep and Wellness, which will all be published shortly.

Designing bespoke feature lighting for public spaces (part 2)

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Designing bespoke feature lighting for public spaces (part 2)

Following on from part one of Inspired By Design’s bespoke lighting series, the company’s Simon Shuck focuses part two on materials used to create one-off lighting pieces…

In every type of project whether hospitality, residential or commercial and any space where there is a large ceiling void, a bespoke lighting feature is often commissioned to both illuminate the space and complete the design.

The question that faces designers is what type of feature light will match the design and complete the space.

The choice of material is particularly critical as its impact needs to be both visually stunning and work aesthetically in its surroundings.

The most common material used for large lighting features is crystal, which has the benefit of being available in a multitude of shapes, For example: octagons, triedri, rods, droplets, almonds, diamonds, alberts and spheres. The crystals can be either facetted or non-facetted and are available in every colour imaginable.

Crystals vary not only in shape and colour but in quality grades ranging from K9 (a Chinese crystal) at the lowest end of the price spectrum to Asfour and Swarovski at the high-end.

Image credit: Inspired By Design

Beyond crystal, there are many other materials that can achieve the desired effect. For example:

Blown glass spheres are very popular. These differ in size depending on the glass blowers’ capabilities; the finishes can be transparent, frosted or coloured (either solid colour or with streaks) or designed to mimic other materials such as alabaster.

Image credit: Inspired By Design

Alabaster itself is a popular choice as its gives warmth to the design but does have some dimensional limitations.

Textured glass is a good choice as artists can fuse colours to blend in with the finishes that are being used. Glass lengths can vary greatly depending on specification.

Acrylic is an under-utilised material and with a greater choice of finishes shapes and sizes it can provide a very satisfactory result. Worth considering if within the public area the fitting is sited close to the entrance where weather conditions could affect it.

Image credit: Inspired By Design

Laser cut is extremely popular at present. This enables other fixtures in the design to be replicated into a light fitting. Generally produced in metal and with a choice of finishes can match the metalwork used in the rest of the project. Laser cut can also be used with ceramic or porcelain.

Engineered solutions. This approach allows any type of metalwork to be manipulated to produce large or small fittings that run horizontally or vertically through the space.

Wood is an ideal material to use especially if the finish of the joinery element is very needed to be replicated. Finishes can be in Vermeer, laminate or solid wood.

As always our team is on hand to advise and assist you in the development of the light to suit your project and budget.

Inspired By Design is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Inspired By Design

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Visualising the future of F&B spaces in hotel design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Visualising the future of F&B spaces in hotel design

Hospitality will awake from the pandemic to face new challenges when it comes to designing F&B spaces. Hotel Designs turns to the CGI experts at North Made Studio to try and visualise the future of these public-facing outlets…

With the industry on a hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be some important future choices to make for hoteliers.

These choices will need to be made in all areas, but may become most stark within the F&B spaces of their hotels.

Until government guidelines are released, exactly how this sector of the hotel industry will proceed is a mystery. Dictating dates for reopening and the easing of certain measures will be crucial to define how the industry needs to adapt.

Should measures not be eased enough and distancing remain in place for the foreseeable future, questions will need to asked about profitably for certain spaces in a ‘socially-distanced’ world. Within the hotel sector F&B spaces may not be deemed a profitable use of available space.

From a visualisation perspective there may be more focus put on the finer details of a F&B space. Viewpoints centred around individual seating areas, up-selling the attributes of the table setting, rather then focusing on the overall aspect of the whole F&B interior area.

Some hoteliers my choose to get ahead of the game and move F&B spaces outdoors, allowing the potential for these spaces to open sooner. Over the last few years interior design for the luxury F&B sector has tried to bring the outdoors in, with Biophilia becoming a growing trend. This potential move of F&B spaces from indoor to outdoors would switch this around. Visually this could allow for outdoor F&B spaces to be depicted with extensive greenery, using the current trend and taking it beyond what was capable within an indoor environment. Or the alternative could happen, and a drive to bring the indoor aesthetic to outdoor spaces could become a trend.

The visualisation sector is geared up to work with both interior and exterior spaces, minimising any differentiation between the CG imagery produced in terms quality or realism.

Another possibly trend for F&B spaces within the hotel sector may be to move more than just the seating/eating areas outdoors. With the popularity of street food kiosks, van and trailers, There is the potential to move the complete catering service outside. Providing an innovative feature to the hotel experience that also opens up the F&B space to the general public, increasing potential custom.

Another great possibility of this is that the catering trailer/van can easily be switched out, to provide customers will different food and drink offerings on a regular basis. Incredible engaging visualisation can be produced for these kinds of external spaces. Creating the scene is just the start, population elements can be embedded within the scene to built a complete visual that includes food trailers, tables, chairs, different demographic of people. Finer details can also be added such as drinks on tables, litter bins. The more detailed the space is visualised, the more realistic and engaging it can be.

To further explore the future of F&B spaces in hotel design, we need to take things back to a pre-COVID stage. Many companies are simply waiting out the Coronavirus pandemic, putting projects on hold, in the hope that things will return to some semblance of normality. For these type of businesses the visual aspects of their F&B spaces will continue to follow current trends.

Experiential

Customers need to be enticed to utilise the F&B facilities within the hotel, creating engaging design with attractive styling is key. Sell these experiences during the early phases of a project with 360 degree viewpoints and visual reality tours can be a great way of boosting interest and getting designs approved.

Convenience

A core factor for F&B spaces in hotels is their convenience. Ensuring the spaces are easily accessible and positioned close to heavy footfall areas, will help to increase their usage. Positioning and ‘eye-catching’ features can be showcased via traditional still CG images, assisting the planing and development phases.

Variety

No two hotel customers are the same, with hotel spaces being used for both business and pleasure, the needs of specific customers will vary. Offering a variety of services with a F&B space will accommodate for ‘on the go’ customers as well as those customers who have more time to sit down and have a full meal. Showcase these innovative features via the use of cameo shot visuals.

Adaptability

The ability for a F&B space to be multi-purpose is vital. Catering for breakfast, lunch, snacks, dinner and drinks allows for the capture of more customers throughout the day.

With the core features of the space remaining the same, the F&B space can be created in CGI for visualisation purposes, and redressed several times to show the adaptability of the space.

Image credit: North Made Studio

Overall F&B spaces within hotels are facing some challenging times. But whatever happens in the future regarding reaction to COVID, these spaces will always be required  in some form. And the visualisation sector will be there to assist with what changes to the design ethos are needed. If new ways to communicate a space are required, the technological advancements in virtual reality could be the key to creating ongoing engagement in the future.

North Made Studio is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: North Made Studio

PRODUCT WATCH: Vegas lighting by MASIERO

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
PRODUCT WATCH: Vegas lighting by MASIERO

Italian artisanal manufacturer MASIERO has collaborated with industrial designer Marc Sadler to create a glamorous new contemporary yet classic lighting collection called Vegas…

The Vegas collection by MASIERO is all about luxury and high-end design. The striking pieces are very in tune with the contemporary yet also emanates a timeless quality.

As the name suggests, it was inspired by the bold, eye-catching styles and flamboyant energy of Las Vegas.

The Vegas collection is the result of a collaborative effort between lighting design firm MASIERO, and industrial designer Marc Sadler. Sadler is a French citizen who was born in Austria, and currently resides in Milan. Having graduated in 1968 from the ENSAD in Paris, he is an industry veteran whose career has taken him across Europe, Asia and North America. Sadler’s eclectic background and technical design prowess mean that today he works as a design consultant for a variety of companies across numerous industries. His work has been recognised with many international design awards, including four times being the recipient of the Compasso d’Oro ADI.

Image credit: The Vegas collection by MASIERO

The lighting collection brings together the two materials which are key for MASIERO: glass and metal. Rows of transparent glass strips are perfectly positioned and attached around a metal structure. The creation of invisible eyelets and an ultraviolet gluing process allows the strips to be held in place without the need to drill the glass or use visible screws. The bases, stems, and internal structure are made from metal which has been beautifully gilded in champagne gold leaf. Customers can also order other metal finishes to suit the look they desire. Illumination comes from LED strip lights that run along with the frame and sit behind plexiglass to ensure it is easy to clean. Most models have dimmable LED lights.

This is an opulent and refined collection. The use of soft gold and a clear textured glass succeeds in giving it the desired classical feel. The strips of glass look much like ice, but also precious and jewel-like when lit. It is sculptural and there is a sense they are suspended delicately on the exterior of the lights.

The band of the inner metal structure provides the lights with a clean geometric form. Seen through the glass strip the metal has a lovely rippled gold effect, which adds depth. This is most striking on the curved vertical wall lights where the light shines from behind on both sides.

Each individual glass strip is completely unique. The ‘rock’ effect is created using a special process that deliberately deforms the thick glass pieces using heat. They each have a similar feel with imprisoned bubbles of air, yet no two will deform in precisely the same manner. It is a technique which the designer says gives the glass “an emotional allure that refers to the workings of the great glass masters.”

The Vegas collection boasts an extensive range of individual pieces. The design of the overall collection is strictly unified through materiality and the repeated use of curved rows of the glass strips nestled over a gold band.

Pendant styles are available in single lights as well as circular clusters of three or five lights. The single pendants range from 12cm all the way up to 60cm in diameter, and the largest cluster is 80cm in diameter. Rows of pendant lights in rectangular alignment come with three, five, or seven drops. There are also variations with multiple vertical tiers. The longest piece is 175cm in height, with a fine and elegant 27cm diameter.

To stretch the length of dining tables or for use in billiard rooms, choose from sweeping oval shapes with vertical glass strips, or long tubular forms that run horizontally and echo the tiered drops. The collection also includes curved vertical wall lights and ceiling variations, plus an oval table lamp.

Experimentation and commitment to the design concept allowed this collection to be developed into an array of very refined shapes. This makes the range extremely versatile for use in both commercial and residential settings.

Masiero is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Masiero

FEATURE: When architecture and lighting design collide

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
FEATURE: When architecture and lighting design collide

Hotel Designs learns the story and latest lighting collection from Buster + Punch, a British home fashion label, founded in 2012 by Architect Massimo Buster Minale…

It all started in a garage in East London, building custom motorbikes. Buster + Punch innovates with solid metals, to transform ordinary functional fittings into extraordinary interior details for residential, hotels and commercial projects.

The brand is deep rooted in London’s fashion, music and sub-culture scene and harnesses this energy to elevate the products.The horizontal range of products comes in a limited palette of unique finishes to help designers specify with confidence and ensure a perfect match.

Exhaust is a new collection of the trailblazing interior spotlights inspired by motorbike exhaust just launched. The range features four new products; a fixed, an adjustable and a track spotlight, alongside a pendant light. Decorative yet functional, Exhaust is designed to elevate task lighting to a new level, providing directional illumination to interior surfaces and architectural detailing.

Image credit: Buster + Punch

Each Exhaust spotlight is fitted with a beautifully machined, solid metal baffle designed to capture and diffuse light. The unique baffle design features Buster + Punch’s unmistakable new linear knurl pattern and signature torx screws, alongside a precision-cut honeycomb grill, engineered to create a delicate metallic glow whilst also emitting a precise, non-glare, directional light.

“Exhaust finally puts functional lighting back in the spotlight,” explained Massimo Buster Minale, founder and creative director. All too often forgotten as back- ground lighting, we wanted to create a compelling range of decorative task lights that would fit seamlessly into any home or hospitality space, whilst remaining memorable – much like the roar of a motorbikes exhaust.”

Developed by the Buster + Punch design studio, Burnt Steel is an innovative/ fashion-forward finish first launched in Spring 2020. When a motorbike exhaust runs lean, the excessive heat turns the metal into a stunning rainbow of blue, purple and yellow. Harnessing an oxide effect, when applied to marine-grade stainless steel the result is a highly original and unique metal effect. Burnt Steel leads the way in new metallics and unlike an applied finish, the cutting-edge process means that no two finishes are ever the same.

Buster + Punch is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Buster + Punch

CASE STUDY: Creating statement lighting for Orlando World Center Marriott

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: Creating statement lighting for Orlando World Center Marriott

With industry casting a spotlight on public areas, Hotel Designs explores how designONE studio created the statement lighting inside Orlando World Center Marriot…

At the Orlando World Center Marriott, Stephanie Head, Design Principal of designONE studio, teamed with Cameron Coxworth Adler of BP Lighting to meet the project’s lighting needs.

Hudson Valley Lighting Group Contract (HVLG) combined custom with standard pieces to make another standout hospitality space, tailored to Head’s vision and the hotel’s needs.

That vision had a name: “Undulating Rhythm.”

Providing a focal point for the lobby bar while adding much-needed sparkle at night, these staggering fireworks fixtures tied in to the Troy Odyssey pendants over the bar and satisfied the “undulating rhythm” requirement in three ways:

  • The arms of the fixture undulated
  • The metal shade cup for one of the class shades had an undulating pattern
  • And the large circular fixtures were hung in an undulating manner

Getting there was an easy collaborative process. Our team met several times with the designer as well as maintained good communication via multiple conference calls and emails to refine Head’s original concepts. The designer had some inspiration images of a massive single fixture to fill the space.

Due to the engineering that would be involved with a single fixture, we decided to create a large cluster of fixtures which would still be quite vast in scale instead.

Head wanted a variety of glass “orbs” to create interest. Exploring the deep reserves of the HVLG standard offering, she and our team pulled inspiration from the Troy Odyssey collection for one of the glass elements. This of course added to a sense of design unity throughout the space, as the bar is lit with Odyssey pendants.

HVLG Contract created models of the three glass “shades” for review, and once approved, the fixtures went into production. The end result is a dynamic and incredibly large-scale lighting display that perfectly fits the soaring ceilings of the lobby bar.

Hudson Valley Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Hudson Valley Lighting

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Shining light on cordless luxury for 2020

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Shining light on cordless luxury for 2020

While new technologies are coming to the surface as the industry starts to emerge from lockdown, Hotel Designs asks Voltra Lighting to explain why designers are switching their attention to cordless luxury…

What is it about a luxury hotel that makes it so desirable to the discerning traveller? Be it the Six Senses, Waldorf Astorias or Four Seasons of the world, all of them exude a distinct aura – an elegant mix of ambience, design and attention to detail.

Design experts will agree that it takes strategically designed light installations to effectively tie all these elements together and truly elevate the hotel experience.

This is why high-end brands are constantly innovating to deliver more exclusive and advanced luxury lighting options. Currently, there is a big focus on fast-tracking a wireless lighting future. As legendary designer Philippe Starck puts it: “Everything that can disappear has to disappear [sooner or later].”

Designer brands that fabricate new-age portable lights, such as Voltra Lighting, can be found in some of the finest hotels in the world. Their iconic lamps are intelligently engineered and carefully crafted to enhance the ambience of the space. Inspired by the gentle flickering of a candle-light, Voltra’s elegant range of lamps are perfectly suited to deliver an atmosphere of intimacy and richness.

Insight into a new generation of luxury cordless lamps

As with most things in the world of design and technology, the wireless lights too will be constantly reimagined to enthrall the new generation of hotel patrons.

According to Voltra’s team of master designers, here are the cordless lighting trends that will feature in many a luxury hotel premises in 2020 and beyond:

  1. Soft colors for added opulence: Ambient light diffusers in brushed gold, muted nickel and antique bronze are shades that are seen to work really well in delivering a rich glamorous look.
  2. Go all natural : Increasingly, elegant and intimate cordless light-sources are being fashioned out of naturally available materials such as wood, bamboo and cork. Voltra’s Totem range is unique in its use of precision cut alabaster stone that offers a handcrafted look and creates even illumination.
  3. The future is outdoor: Battery-operated outdoor lighting needs to be able to brave the elements and yet sport a slick design. Spearheading this trend is Voltra’s range of IP65-rated lamps that are resistant to both water and dust damage.
  4. Circular lighting: Be it lighting up your bathroom vanity or hotel lobby, these circular vessels of light tend to also stand out as a central decorative object owing to their unique design.

Journey from a world of wired to battery-powered

The cordless movement began way back in the late 1980s. In those times, wireless lights came in rudimentary designs and delivered low power output – making them unlikely candidates to grace living spaces of luxury properties. But, today, since these lamps have evolved to deliver higher lumen output per watt; the status quo has completely changed.

Especially when seamlessly and tastefully integrated into the property’s architectural and interior design, the right lighting is seen to transform hotel spaces into an oasis of comfort and splendour.

So, when adding new lighting fixtures into the hotel suite or speciality restaurant, what must designers and hoteliers keep in mind?

For one, the lighting fixture should be a joy to behold – both for its form and function. Thoughtfully and intelligently curated and situated, it can create a strong impression in the minds of discerning travellers. Secondly, it needs to be able to adapt to the ever-changing luxury hotel interiors.

On both counts, high-end cordless lighting can deliver. The sheer mobility offered by ambient wireless lights also creates a flexible atmosphere and mood that can be hyper-personalised to each high-net worth guest.

Voltra Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Voltra Lighting

CASE STUDY: Lighting the facade of Radisson Blu Hotel, Larnaca

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: Lighting the facade of Radisson Blu Hotel, Larnaca

The Radisson Blu, Larnaca was to be illuminated externally with dynamic lighting supplied by illumination Physics, and designed by Archtube, to draw attention, as well as provide a sense of arrival, which was critical to the marketing of the property…

The pace of development in Cyprus is rapid. The influx of ex-patriot investment and the opening of casinos for the first time has created an exciting yet competitive market.

Developers must therefore make strong visual statements if they are to stand out in the rapidly changing business landscape.

The Radisson Blu, Larnaca was no exception, and a statement was required. Therein lay the genesis of the lighting design that was conceived of by Cypriot lighting designers Archtube.

Image credit: UNSEEN VIEWS (Charis Solomou Architectural Photography)

The property consists of two towers connected by a podium. The façade containing the main entrance is entirely populated with guestroom windows and other balconies. This face of the building would be naturally illuminated and did not require external treatment other than signage. It was the slab sides of the building that required illumination as well as the façades of the main tower and secondary tower that face each other across what would be otherwise very dark space. Illumination Physics’ instruction was to produce a synchronised dynamic display of indirect illumination that would be as homogeneous as possible given the limited locations that could be used to mount the light fixtures.

The dimensions of the building are modest; it does not exceed 18-storeys in height for the main tower and four less for the secondary tower. This meant that even the tallest façades would fall into the range of two new illumination Physics light fixtures – the IP Circular Wash Quattro (a 270-watt RGBW wash light) and the IP Rectangular Wash Mono (a 220-watt RGBW wash light).

The new powerful circular wash light uses heat pipe technology to cool the LEDs and represents a significant step forward for a powerful light fixture in such a compact and attractive package. Where appropriate rather than using a powerful circular fixture, illumination Physics choose rectangular fixtures producing a rectangular beam to add to the overall illumination.

Mounting the luminaires was illumination Physics’ greatest challenge, particularly for the two banks of twelve 270-watt lights that would illuminate the two prominent façades of the main tower.

The lights would be mounted into a frame designed by illumination Physics so that the grouping and spacing were fixed according to their optimal calculations.

The lighting of these two façades was complicated by the fact that the achievable and very shallow set-back was different on one side to the other and two focusses were required. To achieve this, overlapping beams of light with different lens angles were used.

In addition to the façade lighting, illumination Physics supplied the flag pole lights in white light. The IP Circular Series – Quattro 3-6 (25-watt) was ideal. Flag poles are a standard requirement of Radisson for all their hotels worldwide.

Martin Opolka, illumination Physics’ European manager, and illumination Physics partner and Technical Director, Peter Kemp, attended the on-site testing and commissioning, accompanied by illumination Physics’ own programmer who commissioned and programmed the control system. Illumination Physics’ work also included testing and the rectification of all data connections, including the aiming/focusing of all lights and the installation and setup of the complete control system.

Prior to the system being installed, an illumination Physics representative attended the site to instruct the installers on the installation of the data network and other requirements for their systems.

The control system illumination Physics set up provides a very useful control for a hotel client. Preprogramed scenes/sequences can easily be manually selected by the client via the large buttons on the laptop touch screen, which can be labelled with specific names and colours for easy identification. The standard sequence is programmed in consultation with the client and automatically runs every day, activated by the time of day or sunrise/sunset using Quadcore’s astronomical clock function.

This level of care is typical of illumination Physics’ inclusive project management in which they can guarantee a perfect outcome by controlling all aspects of the work.

The lighting effect exceeds the promise of the initial design and the ambition and intent of the lighting designer and their client. The value is such that plans have already begun for the illumination of the second Cypriot hotel of the same brand, currently under construction.

Illumination Physics is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here

Main image credit: UNSEEN VIEWS (Charis Solomou Architectural Photography)

PRODUCT WATCH: Horo by Masiero

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
PRODUCT WATCH: Horo by Masiero

Taking cues from vintage style, Horo by Masiero is a striking new lighting collection featuring glass discs and brushed brass…

The sun is an ancient and enduring source of inspiration. Tapping into this, the design for Horo took the depiction of the sun as a circle and related icons like the Sun god Ra as its starting point.

The distinctive illuminated discs form a perfect archetypal representation of the sun and give this collection an eternal and graphic quality.

Horo is part of the Dimore Collection by MASIERO, and designed by Paris based interior designer Pierre Gonalons. In 2002 he graduated from École Camondo, which offers a five-year program in interior architecture and object design.

MASIERO is committed to the use of high-quality materials and material innovation. Horo is no exception.

The main diffuser is a sandwich construction, which comprises two circles of prismatic glass held together by an outer brass metal frame. An LED strip is placed inside the frame and shines between the two layers of glass. The diameter of each diffuser is 30cm.

To increase the luminance, Horo also features a second light source. This sits within a smaller brushed brass circle perpendicular to the main form.

The overall design is sleek and modern, whilst the finishes feel more vintage. Despite the very slim profile, Horo has a remarkably three-dimensional quality. Illuminated more brightly at the edges, the disc can appear almost globe-like.

The double light sources of Horo give it a unique look – a diffused glow as well as a soft directed light.

The glass itself is textured with a diamond pattern. This gives it a “vintage flavor that I like so much,” says Gonalons. The collection is available in various glass colors: transparent, green, powder pink, light blue and smoke. Gonalons explains that the colors reflect a desire for a contemporary palette, yet also take inspiration from the 1950s Italian style.

The design of Horo features two materials which are particularly important for MASIERO: glass and metal. The firm has extensive experience and a strong skill base in metalwork. Glass is an iconic material which is historically linked to nearby Venice and also widely sought after in lighting.

The material choices support and enrich the design concept.

Horo is a stunning collection that will sit equally well in domestic as well as commercial contexts. As a simple design that effectively balances the decorative with the functional, it could easily become a sought after classic fixture which interior designers readily incorporate into their projects.

The range includes wall, table, floor and hanging lights and it is available in several glass colors: transparent, pink, green, light blue and smoke.

Masiero is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Masiero

VIRTUAL ROUNDTABLE: The role of UV lighting in hotel design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
VIRTUAL ROUNDTABLE: The role of UV lighting in hotel design

With the industry’s attention focused towards possible solutions following the Covid-19 crisis, Hotel Designs, in collaboration with the human-centric lighting brand humanlumen, has brought together a handful of industry experts to discuss UV lighting’s role in the post-pandemic world. Editor Hamish Kilburn moderates… 

On the panel: 

Recently, humanlumen switched on our attention at Hotel Designs to focus our editorial gaze, during pandemic paralysis, towards the possibilities and boundaries of architectural lighting design. The launch of the brand’s Clean Air Series inspired us to investigate how figureheads of the industry are reacting to UV Lighting.

No question was off limit as the panel of interior designers and lighting designers put humanlumen through its paces to understand Clean Air Series and UV lighting’s role on tomorrow’s hygienic hospitality scene.

Hamish Kilburn: Andrew, so that everyone can familiarise themselves with the product, can you briefly explain humanlumen’s Clean Air Series?

Andrew Boydell: We have invested a lot of time and money in the new technology around UV lighting and its effects on bacteria in the workplace as well as in hospitality spaces. We believe that UV lighting in these areas is going to be fairly revolutionary going forward. From a hospitality point of view, we have developed Clean Air Series, a purification product that integrates a high level of UV light within the system. This allows up to 300 cubic-metres of air to be cleaned in four hours – think of it as a remote AC unit with multiple UV light chambers. 

Image caption: humanlumen’s Clean Air Series UV Lighting unit.

Mark Elliott: There has been a lot of research around the risks attached to UV lighting around eyesight and artwork, for example. One of the benefits of using LED lights over halogen lights is that the reduced UV prevents issues such as degrading artwork/finishes. How have you considered this in Clean Air Series?

AB: The product that has gone to market is a completely sealed unit. There are nine high intensity UV bulbs within a purification unit, which is basically an aluminium housing. Within that unit is a motor, a cooling unit and a number of chambers. The air is passed through the chambers, and no UV light is exposed to the outside world. It has been a major consideration of ours, as well as an engineering challenge.

“As manufacturers and designers, we all need to start looking and thinking outside the box now!” – Chris Peach, Principal lighting designer, FUTURE Designs.

HK: Mark, has UV Lighting been on your radar as a lighting designer?

ME: From our perspective, to be honest, it’s not something we have been investigating, which is probably because our focus as lighting designers is the beautification of spaces while enabling task-based solutions. However, it’s interesting to hear how lighting is being used to create more sterile environments.

Chris Peach: As manufacturers and designers, we all need to start looking and thinking outside the box now! With the ability to integrate the UV element within a luminaire could have major benefits. UV lighting is used throughout hospital environments, and there has to be a way of integrating that in hospitality.

Ariane Steinbeck: I want to continuously led by science. What I know that has been proven is that the detectability of the Covid-19 virus continues for between two and three hours in an aerosol format. What scientists don’t know yet is how much virus is needed to make you sick. From a practical standpoint, when this lighting is switched on out of hours, and the virus has settled on different surfaces, what does your product do to eliminate it?

AB: There are three elements: airborne particulates, surface particulates and particulates carried on the person. Airborne has been tackled with a continuous clean air unit that will run 24/7. Essentially, you will leave that in a hospitality space throughout the day. The surface element is different. The exposed UV light’s role, to be used when someone is not in that space, will help to clean the surfaces, and be used in harmony with the cleaners. We have been investigating an exposed UV product that will clean 25 square-metres of space. Of course, there would have to be a very clear protocol of use and we are looking at this to be linked to a control system so it can be activated when the room is not active. For a typical hotel room, we are estimating that this process will take an hour.

HK: What are the pitfalls in today’s lighting design?

Dylan Wills: Across the board, everyone would value in being more educated in lighting technology. Too often is lighting an afterthought behind the interior design itself.

David Mason: A lot of clients realise the benefits of lighting designers. There was a time where we would only ever use lighting designers in high-end projects. Now, though, we collaborate with lighting designers for most of the hotel projects we work on. 

“As soon as we all started to save energy and technology advanced, lighting design became a lot more convoluted.” – Mark Elliott, Global Creative Director, FPOV.

Neil Andrew: I worked on a project once where they didn’t have a lighting consultant. When I had won the argument to bring one on, they ended up removing 30 downlights, which of course saved a lot of money.

ME: As soon as we all started to save energy and technology advanced, lighting design became a lot more convoluted. As a lighting designer, keeping up-to-date with tech every day is very complex. That has driven designers to realise that they are not experts in that area.

HK: From a wellbeing perspective, how is lighting climbing up on the agenda in hospitality?

ME: I think we can take inspiration from the aviation industry. There have been studies carried out on how significant lighting can be to help combat jet lag. I’m not sure about UV lighting, but there are certainly applications at the moment on lighting being used to enhance wellbeing in hospitality.

NA: In terms of mental health, it’s hard to know the impact of Covid-19 right now, but I guess in general the big one for me is circadian lighting systems. The research and technology that will allow a room to intuitively adjust the lighting to where you have travelled from in order to aid jet lag is pretty impressive.

DM: We were working with a hotel chain to design windowless rooms. The idea behind the lighting was so that you could adjust the lighting to time zones. This also worked around your circadian rhythms.

HK: In these sessions, we always try to look at these new innovations and conversations with clients and budgets in mind. How realistic is it therefore for you to pitch these new innovations to clients?

DW: In this exact moment in time, the focus should be on the businesses that are having to reopen hotels in cost-effective ways. Adding new products that will incorporate expenditure will be a big focus. We have been speaking to hotel operators who are just moving furniture around and changing the lobby configuration because they simply don’t have the money to spend.

I can see UV lighting being integrated into new-builds. However, with existing buildings it will be difficult considering the financial positions of developers and operators at the moment.

ME: I believe there are two sides in this. On the one side there are people who are trying to cut corners, while others are trying to find a unique sales point. Also, the more a piece of technology gets adopted, the cheaper it becomes. When that happens, the benefits are then able to be used on a wider scale.

AS: I believe, at this point, everyone is trying to ‘out market’ their cleaning protocols. Personally, I doubt it will inspire the consumer to choose one brand over the other. There was a big opportunity missed to do something unanimous across all brands in all countries to inspire confidence. In terms of mandating improvements, it will be difficult because hotel owners are struggling to pay the bills.

HK: So Andrew, is the product better suited to new-builds?

AB: Not necessarily. We were approached yesterday by a boutique chain with nine hotels. They were looking for us to fit the UVC light units and the centric lighting units in their existing properties

DW: There is another sector of the market that we should highlight, and that’s distressed assets. As we move forward, we will see hotel operators purchasing those struggling hotels and rebranding them to become new products. There, I see the UV lighting working and it will instil security in consumers’ minds.

AS: What is the cost of one of these units?

AB: It’s variable depending on the volume. But if you work between the parameter of 1,200 – £1,700 per unit.

NA: How visible are these units?

AB: The best way I can describe them is similar to a free-standing water dispenser. The unit is mobile and will sit in the corner of the room.

Matthew Voaden: I’m assuming that you are looking at exposed UV units in guestrooms and the purification in public areas?

AB: The exposed UV will benefit the turnaround, for sure. The air purification unit will give a constant purification of the space.

HK: Where do you see lighting in hospitality going in the future?

“One of the main elements I see being a focus of innovation in the future is control systems.” – David Mason, Director and Head of Hospitality, Scott Brownrigg.

DM: The margin between too much lighting and not enough lighting is very small. Most guests, I would argue, checking into a hotel want something simple.

ME: David’s right, people want flexibility. They want it to be intuitive. It’s a challenge to operate all those functions and not have a complex control system as a result. It’s a mass quandary. One of the main elements I see being a focus of innovation in the future is control systems. I can see these systems using tech that is embedded in each fitting so that the consumer can control each light from one device.

DM: That, as well as Covid-19, will steer more things being operational from your own device.

ME: Lighting is a constant; it is everywhere. Development of lighting will be multiple carriers of different things, which as a result simplifies ceilings. A good lighting solution is tailored to work around any space.

DW: Lighting design and interior design have to work hand-in-hand. Decisions have to be communicated throughout the entire process.

DM: This is going to be a catalyst in a lot of industries. I believe there is going to be a lot more collaboration between other industries to discover purposeful solutions.

HK: What lighting solutions are you integrating into the projects you are working on at the moment?

ME: David and I are working on a hotel where in the public spaces there will be a focus on day to night technology.

DM: We wanted to create a particular experience in the corridors, which are currently long and bland. Together with FPOV, we developed and prototyped a light fitting and it will now be manufactured and installed. Together we were able to get the client on board with this and it really does come down to designers working closely together to produce the best solution.

AS: Making things simpler is our objective. If we can add benefits that are automatic then that’s even better and I am looking forward to seeing what added value UV lighting can bring to the table.

HK: So there you have it, collaborations between designers, manufacturers and specialists are allowing the industry to navigate a clean path forward in hospitality for a post-pandemic world. In case there was any doubt, UV lighting is now on the agenda as today’s hotel designers are looking for new ways to functionally adapt spaces so that they meet the hygienic demands of tomorrow’s travellers with the ever-evolving demands for characterful, design-led spaces. If you would like to have your say on UV Lighting and other lighting solutions, please tweet us @hoteldesigns.

humanlumen, which is based in Clerkenwell, is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Is UVC lighting on your design agenda for the post-pandemic world?

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Is UVC lighting on your design agenda for the post-pandemic world?

Lighting brand humanlumen has introduced Clean Air Series, UVC lighting that actively reduces bacterial and viral charge. Hotel Designs investigates…

humanlumen, a lighting brand that prides itself for having a uniquely human-centric approach, has introduced the Clean Air Series, a range of UVC Air Sterilisation Units.

The Clean Air Series is a range of efficient UVC lighting devices that actively reduce the bacterial and viral charge of the air in closed environments, such as offices, classrooms, hotel rooms and healthcare environments.

The International Ultraviolet Association (IUVA) believes that UV disinfection technologies can play a role in a multiple barrier approach to reducing the transmission of the virus causing COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2, based on current disinfection data and empirical evidence.

Image credit: humanlumen

UVC Air Purification Unit

The powerful UVC radiation is totally isolated inside the Air Filtration System (AFS) as exposure of UV light, of any type, in high dosage to the naked eye will cause potential long-term health issues.

The system draws in contaminated air and removes all bacteria through a series of integral filters and then delivers clean air back into the space. Each unit cleanses up to 3,000 cubic square metres of open office space and is a simple plug and play system with no integration into the existing mechanical systems.

The clean air units work like an air purifier, but instead of filters it uses the UVC technology to eliminate the viruses. The fan located in the bottom of the fitting sucks in the air of the room and channels it through a series of UVC light canals that have the UVC lights. The UVC kills the viruses and the clean air is released in the room through a carbon filter.

The carbon filter’s main purpose is to clean the odours from the air, with an additional dust filter at the entrance of the fan, neither is essential to kill bacteria, this is the role of the UVC light.

humanlumen, which is based in Clerkenwell, is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: humanlumen

CASE STUDY: Lighting the iconic Britannia Hotel

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: Lighting the iconic Britannia Hotel

Following an extensive three-year renovation, the iconic Britannia hotel reopened in April 2019 as a luxury five star hotel and member of The Leading Hotels of the World. The complete refurbishment was designed by leading interior architects Metropolis, working with renowned lighting designers Stokkan Lys

Metropolis’ clear attention to detailing and use of quality materials have resulted in 22,000 square metres of contemporary classic style, dressed with continental and local references.

Selected to deliver highlights in the contemporary classic aesthetic, key Heathfield lighting can be found throughout the 257 hotel rooms. Junior, Superior and Deluxe suites feature Amelia or Antero bedside table lamps in their bestselling Antique glass finish, completed with an Andro desk lamp in each room.

Heathfield  & Co’s Czarina Old Gold chandelier forms the central feature of the high-end Signature suite, whilst a pair of Herzog Champagne table lamps draw focus in the inviting conference centre lounge.

Image credit: Britannia/Heathfield Lighting

Heathfield Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Britannia/Heathfield Lighting

IN PICTURES: New photography emerges of ME Dubai at the Opus

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
IN PICTURES: New photography emerges of ME Dubai at the Opus

Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has shared new images of Opus, an innovative glass-façade building that was designed by Zaha Hadid Architects…

Home to newly opened ME Dubai, the Opus, which conceptualised in 2007 by Zaha Hadid Architects, explores the balance between solid and void, opaque and transparent, interior and exterior.

The late Zaha Hadid herself presented this project as the only hotel in which she created both its architecture and interiors, which gives it a special significance among the architecture firm’s portfolio of work.

“The cube has been ‘eroded’ in its centre, creating a free-form void that is an important volume of the design in its own right.”

Spanning 84,300 square metres (907,400 square feet), the Opus was designed as two separate towers that coalesce into a singular whole – taking the form of a cube. The cube has been ‘eroded’ in its centre, creating a free-form void that is an important volume of the design in its own right. The two halves of the building on either side of the void are linked by a four-storey atrium at ground level and also connected by an asymmetric 38 metre wide, three-storey bridge 71 metres above the ground.

Striking architecture of the cube like building

Image credit: Laurian Ghinitoiu

“The precise orthogonal geometries of the Opus’ elemental glass cube contrast dramatically with the fluidity of the eight-storey void at its centre,” explained Christos Passas, project director at Zaha Hadid Architects.

The cube’s double-glazed insulating façades incorporate a UV coating and a mirrored frit pattern to reduce solar gain. Applied around the entire building, this dotted frit patterning emphasises the clarity of the building’s orthogonal form, while at the same time, dissolving its volume through the continuous play of light varying between ever-changing reflections and transparency.

Image credit: Laurian Ghinitoiu

The void’s 6,000 square metre façade is created from 4,300 individual units of flat, single-curved or double-curved glass. The high-efficiency glazing units are comprised of 8mm Low-E glass (coated on the inside), a 16mm cavity between the panes and two layers of 6mm clear glass with a 1.52mm PVB resin laminate. This curved façade was designed using digital 3D modelling that also identified specific zones which required tempered glass.

During the day, the cube’s façade reflects the sky, the sun and the surrounding city; whilst at night, the void is illuminated by a dynamic light installation of individually controllable LEDs within each glass panel.

Furniture by Zaha Hadid Design is installed throughout the hotel, including the ‘Petalinas’ sofas and ‘Ottomans’ pods in the lobby that are fabricated from materials ensuring a long lifecycle and its components can be recycled. The ‘Opus’ beds are featured in each guestrooms, while the ‘Work & Play’ combination sofa with desk are installed in the suites. The bathrooms incorporate the ‘Vitae’ bathroom collection, designed by Hadid in 2015 for Noken Porcelanosa, continuing her fluid architectural language throughout the hotel’s interiors.

Modern, angular guestroom

Image credit: Laurian Ghinitoiu

The ME Dubai hotel incorporates 74 rooms and 19 suites, while the Opus building also houses offices floors, serviced residences and restaurants, cafes and bars including ROKA, the contemporary Japanese robatayaki restaurant and the MAINE Land Brasserie.

modern bathroom

Image credit: Laurian Ghinitoiu

Sensors throughout the Opus automatically adjust the ventilation and lighting according to occupancy to conserve energy while ME Dubai follows Meliá Hotels International initiatives for sustainable practices. Hotel guests will receive stainless-steel water bottles to use during their stay with drinking water dispensers installed throughout the hotel. With no plastic bottles in guest rooms, and a program to become entirely plastic free in all areas, the hotel is also reducing food waste by not serving buffets and has composters to recycle discarded organics.

Main image credit: Laurian Ghinitoiu

CASE STUDY: Designing the lighting for the Al Munz Mall, Oman

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: Designing the lighting for the Al Munz Mall, Oman

The Al Munz Mall is without doubt the premier shopping mall in Oman. Masiero, the leading high-end decorative lighting company, whose hallmark is great flexibility thanks to its in-house production and project management capabilities, had a key role in making the Al Munz Mall even more unique…

Lighting brand Masiero approached the project of Al Munz Mall in Oman with the LIBE model in the Dimore catalogue, which is a round wooden pendant with a dramatic light effect emanating from the opaque crystal lozenges on its diffusers.

The lighting company developed a cascade composition reaching down from a large ceiling plate with a shiny finish, which creates wondrous reflections and plays of light. The ceiling plate is a key feature, in that its entire structure hangs from the glass ceiling. Masiero’s technicians had to assess and deal with the impact of the whole structure in terms of weight, compatibility of materials and reflectiveness of the glass.

The result was a great success: Masiero managed to create a ceiling plate which is functional, aesthetically pleasing and at one with the central structure of this cascade of light.

One notable feature of this installation is the magical effect as you look up into the ceiling: the reflections of the lights create a starry sky on the glass ceiling.

Masiero is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: MASIERO

SPOTLIGHT ON: Lighting public areas in Radisson Blu Hotel Cyprus

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
SPOTLIGHT ON: Lighting public areas in Radisson Blu Hotel Cyprus

As Hotel Designs conclude putting ‘Public Areas’ under the spotlight, Illumination Physics shares how it gave Radisson Blu Hotel Cyprus’ arrival experience a new meaning with innovative lighting solutions…

Illumination Physics is famous for integrated façade lighting, however that is not all we do. Radisson Blu Hotel’s Chandelier in Cyprus shows a different side of our activities, albeit with the same focus of project specific custom design.

The hotel opened its doors to the public in October 2018. One of the new breed of hospitality venues in the rapidly expanding Cypriot leisure market, this Radisson is actually the first business hotel set in an evolving economy. The influx of ex-patriot investment and the opening of casinos in Cyprus for the first time has created an exciting but competitive market in which the developers must make strong visual statements if they are to stand out in the rapidly changing business landscape.

The Radisson Blu is illuminated externally with dynamic lighting by illumination Physics to draw guests’ attention, as the sense of arrival is critical to their experience. Like most modern hotels, the Radisson Blu has an integrated shopping mall. To succeed, this mall needed a point of difference, both in spectacle and personality.

“There are 4,032 pendants in total descending out of a matt black sky.”

A big statement was required

Therein lay the genesis of the grand chandelier that was conceived of by local architects Fluid Design and Cypriot lighting designers Archtube.

Grand in concept and dimension, the chandelier occupies five hundred square metres in two vast displays that occupy the entire ceiling of the mall, surrounding the elevator core and, in turn, surrounded by the retail hub.Bold in vision, the chandelier is comprised of pendant polished hardwood elements protruding downwardly from the plane of the ceiling in five variable lengths from 0.3 metres to 1.1 metres. The display is comprised of groups of 16 pendants which are repeated. Approximately 10 per cent of the pendants are self-illuminated rods of light in lengths of 700mm lit and 700mm lit + 400mm unlit, specially created for the project by illumination Physics. There are 4,032 pendants in total descending out of a matt black sky. The chandelier occupies five hundred square metres.

Since the geometric design of the chandelier was set, the challenge was to design and manufacture the illuminated pendants. Our challenge was to design the pendants so that their elegance and function befitted their purpose. To meet the challenge, we proposed the following:

  • All fixtures should use white light only with a colour temperature of 2700K.
  • All fixtures were to be 50mm in diameter.
  • A gradient in the illumination level over the length of the fixture was desirable (some early tests had been done with continuous linear LED illumination, but the result resembled the homogenised image of a fluorescent tube, which was entirely the wrong image.
  • No shadows should occur within the pendant.
  • The majority of the fixtures should have an illuminated section of 700mm, contiguous from the plane of the ceiling to the bottom of the pendant.
  • A lesser quantity of the pendants would have an illuminated length of 700mm PLUS an unilluminated section length of 400mm.
  • Both types were to terminate into the ceiling with no visible fixings.
  • A diameter of 50mm should be chosen.
Close up of the lighting installation on the ceiling

Image credit: UNSEEN VIEWS (Charis Solomou Architectural Photography)

With regards to drivers and dimming, there were several options that were discussed. The most elegant solution presented itself to us, namely that we could create 63 groups of fixtures and have individual dimming control over each group. Further, illuminated pendants could be allocated to these groups in such a way so that a sea of slow motion could be created – this option is what we eventually selected.

With regard to the driver protocol, the client requested DALI to interface them with their in-house KNX control system. The first task was to get the optical design and illuminator working perfectly.

Since the illuminated pendant must provide a perfect shadowless view from any angle, the only way to achieve this was to illuminate the 50mm cylinder axially using a single point of illumination. This could only be done from the top end of the pendant so that the light source could be completely concealed either within the non-illuminated section of the pendant or above the plane of the ceiling. It became apparent that none of the commercially available lenses would be good enough so a custom composite optic was designed for the project. This was crucial because we needed to manage the gradient of intensity precisely. We specified an obvious gradient but with maximum and minimum levels of luminance. The LED lens was designed to interact with a reflector which closed the lower end of the tube. With the aesthetics solved, we moved on to practical issues.

Complex yet totally practical, maintenance for function is simple, and cleaning (always a challenge with chandeliers) is facilitated by the bayonet mount that allows a pendant to be taken down in seconds. The downlights that augment the overall lighting level in the mall are neatly concealed amongst the forest.

Now that the decision had been made to have dynamic dimming, some fundamental choices were required. illumination Physics already manufactures a range of LED driver options. Our choice would be influenced by practical considerations.

The space above the ceiling would be effectively inaccessible so the notion of placing drivers and data in the void was not an option that provided practical maintainability. We dismissed the idea of incorporating an individual driver for each pendant. It was far better to centralise the location of larger drivers capable of controlling many pendants in an easily accessible location away from the ceiling void.

Close up of lighting installation

Image credit: UNSEEN VIEWS (Charis Solomou Architectural Photography)

This decision had a consequence because the ELV cables would be long and we would need to manage any losses. The LED engines required constant current supply so voltage drop was manageable with correctly dimensioned cables. The perfect solution presented itself – the 24V illumination Physics HP-LED Driver 12. Twelve groups of five luminaries could be controlled from one rack-mounted driver. These were to be installed in multiple locations to minimise the cabling. We make both a DMX and a DALI version of this unit and since DALI was being used elsewhere at the Radisson, we went with that protocol.

The lighting effect fulfils the promise of the initial design. Like a vast inverted forest, the timber and illuminated pendants both add great interest to a grand space, providing an aspirational design looking to the future.

Illumination Physics is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: UNSEEN VIEWS (Charis Solomou Architectural Photography)

Hudson Valley Lighting collaborates with designer Becki Owens

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Hudson Valley Lighting collaborates with designer Becki Owens

Designers can create a fresh interior style with the new collection from Hudson Valley Lighting and designer Becki Owens, which combines modern design with Californian bohemian influences…

The new collection by Hudson Valley Lighting is inspired by the unconventionality of bohemianism found in designer Becki Owen’s Californian hometome of San Clemete, as well as her love of contemporary clean lines blended with coastal, mid-century shapes.

Each piece is adaptable and timeless, giving a new lease of life to everyday spaces and providing a focal point to the room that lures you in.

From a young age, popular designer, blogger and trendsetter Owens had her sights set on being an interior designer. Owens was inspired by her parents, who she watched remodel homes, leading her to getting her degree and designing model homes for large developments.

Now she can be found working on projects in residential design, creating simple, clean and elegant environments that she is passionate about, from kitchen makeovers to new builds. Her large social media following is tangible evidence that people are captivated by her designs, and so they have every right to be deemed “Pinterest-dream-home-worthy.” In her collaboration with Hudson Valley Lighting, she brings her well-loved signature style to a collection of modern and sophisticated pieces; the perfect accompaniments to any space or style.

Key Pieces from the Exclusive Collection

Ivy Pendant (Small)

The smallest of the Ivy Pendants features a large clear piece of glass in a simple yet powerful teardrop shape. Three pins strongly hold together the expertly-crafted curve of the shade. Complemented with a choice of a stylish chain or classy gooseneck arm to fix Ivy in place and give the pendant that smart and sleek finish. Available in three sizes, and two finishes: Aged Brass and Polished Nickel.

Ivy Pendant (Large)

Making its presence known loud and clear is the large Ivy Pendant. Regardless of its impressively large size, it completes the room without being aggressive as the simple and sophisticated glass teardrop design naturally brings balance to the room. The pendant is complete with three pins which grasp the finely-crafted bulb. Effortlessly finished with a modern hanging chain or an ageless gooseneck arm, allowing the large Ivy Pendant to become the elegant focal point of any room. Available in three sizes, and two finishes: Aged Brass and Polished Nickel.

Interior shot of chandelier above dining table

Image credit: Hudson Valley Lighting

Ivy Sconce

A little bit different from the rest is the Ivy Sconce. Despite it usually being found around the edges of a room rather than in the apparent centre, it demands to be seen and radiates subtle elegance and charm. A perfectly curved arm cradles an immense teardrop shaped glass which is mounted sturdily by three pins. Owens and Hudson Valley Lighting bring a touch of fresh modern design to the sconce; a type of fixture that is essentially an antique, and was historically found with candles and oil lamps. A classy way to bring light to any space. Available in one size, and two finishes: Aged Brass and Polished Nickel.

Hudson Valley Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Hudson Valley Lighting

LAUNCHING: a new lighting brand with a human-centric approach

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
LAUNCHING: a new lighting brand with a human-centric approach

Hotel Designs has the industry scoop of a new, innovative lighting brand that has launched with the aim to create striking architectural lighting solutions for hotel and hospitality market… 

humanlumen is a nouveau lighting brand with a difference. Led by a collective of lighting professionals and experts with a broad range of experience, the company is on a mission to create effective and efficient lighting solutions that are as positive for people as they are for the environment and businesses.

Spanning a distinct range of sectors, including hospitality, residential, education, health care, retail and leisure, the brand understands the structural form of lighting and takes a mindful approach to provide creative concepts.

The concept of the company came about from a need to do things in a different way; with an aim to change the landscape in which interior designers and consultants approach their lighting concepts. It is driven by a desire to provide human- centric lighting design and products.

Image credit: humanlumen

“With the use of innovative software design, alongside the vast range of products that we design and manufacture, we will offer relevant and creative solutions.” – Andrew Boydell, Humanlumen

At the helm is Andrew Boydell, a principal with more than 24 years experience working within the construction sector on high-profile interior projects both in Europe and the Middle East. His most recent role was Regional Director for Future Designs in the UAE, a designer and manufacturer of high quality luminaires and bespoke lighting solutions. Prior to that he was General Manager at The Nordeon Group UAE, global architectural lighting specialists.

Image credit: humanlumen

Boydell has ambitious plans for the brand. “Our creative team is based in Clerkenwell in the heart of London’s design scene, the obvious choice with all the experience we have collectively in the local and international lighting market and our aim is to develop the brand globally,” he explains. “With the use of innovative software design, alongside the vast range of products that we design and manufacture, we will offer relevant and creative solutions.”

The humanlumen product portfolio encompasses more than 3000 lighting designs including a high-specification downlight, track and spot and linear pendant range. The mix also accounts for both indoor and outdoor use to serve a vast range of lighting schemes.

Humanlumen, which is based in Clerkenwell, is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Humanlumen

FEATURE: Renovating public areas with stylish lighting

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
FEATURE: Renovating public areas with stylish lighting

To round-off our weeks putting ‘Public Areas’ under the spotlight, we are focusing our lens on the opportunities of lighting. Recommended Supplier Vaughan compares the different ambiances its lighting products can create…

Public areas are one of the key spaces to set the tone of a hotel. As soon as a visitor walks through the doors, it is important that they are met with a certain ambience and style that reflects the rest of the hotel.

At Vaughan, we are grateful to be included in numerous hotel projects and renovations – including Grantley Hall, The Langham and Le Bristol Paris.

Grantley Hall is a Grade II listed building, built by Thomas Norton and his son Fletcher Norton, 1st Baron Grantley in the mid-18th century. It has an eclectic history, not just physically – with extensions added in both the 19th and 20th centuries – but also in terms of its use.  Initially a family home, it was turned into a convalescent home during World War II. Then between 1947 and 1974, it was under the ownership of the West Riding County Council where it was used as an adult education residential college.  In 1974, it was transformed once again into a training and conference centre thanks to the North Yorkshire County Council in 1974.  Finally, Valeria Sykes bought the house in 2015, and went on to establish Grantley Hall as the hotel it is now known to be.

The downstairs hallway of Grantley Hall undoubtedly showcases the tone of the rest of the hotel: refined and elegant, with rich, red velvet lined chairs, pleated shades and brass tones throughout. The defined lines of the Georgian architecture are mirrored and maintained in the candlestick table lamps, as well as in the geometric forms of our Regency Hall Lanterns. A sleek combination of brass and glass, the lanterns work well in this space – the glass actively reflecting light across the space and the brass adding to its warmth. Their even separation and display straight down the centre of the hallway echoes the uniformity of Georgian architecture, while marrying with the antique frames, table lamps and picture lights.

The Palm Court at The Langham is very different in style to Grantley Hall, but has an equally beguiling history. Built between 1863 and 1865, it was opened on 10th June, 1865 by the Prince of Wales. The largest and most modern hotel in London at the time, it went on to entertain the likes of Mark Twain, Oscar Wilde, Toscanini and Sibelius, as well as provided the set for the Sherlock Holmes story ‘A Scandal in Bohemia’. In World War II, it was used in part by the Army until it suffered damage by bombs, and after the war it was purchased directly by the BBC. Since then, it has seen two further owners, and two renovations, with its most recent one thanks to the Hong Kong based Great Eagle Holdings.

Image caption: Langham Palm Court/Vaughan

Decidedly more contemporary in feel, this image of the Palm Court shows two chandeliers hanging either side, almost reaching the floor, and brass pieces attached to the wall to create a floral-themed, decorative display. Studded armchairs arc around a table, behind which is a high-backed sofa, and to each side of the sofa is a side-table upon which sits our Woodville Table Lamps. Similar to Grantley Hall, the brass elements neatly come together and create cohesion: the Woodville Table Lamps appear strikingly similar to the salt and pepper shakers on the table, and work well with the brass installation behind.  Cushions on the sofa similarly reflect the floral themes on the wall, while the glass chandeliers add a further sense of drama and light.  Indeed, it is these chandeliers that provide the brightest, most white light in the room, and create a satisfying contrast against the balmy glow of the table lamps.

Le Bristol Paris, like Grantley Hall and The Langham, also has a history to it. Named after Bishop Frederick Hervey, 4th Earl of Bristol, who was an 18th century traveller known for his love of comfort and unwavering standards, it remains one of the most treasured hotels in Paris. Recently refurbished during a six-year stint from 2012 to 2018, it now contains additional Vaughan pieces such as the Saltwood Tripod Table Lamps shown here. A traditional lamp, cast in bronze by a father-son duo in England, it works well in this scene, with the pair neatly framing the painting. Neither predominantly traditional, like Grantley Hall, nor contemporary, like The Langham, Le Bristol Paris appears to combine and weave different styles together – whether that be with a fringed sofa against a historic oil painting, or an antique-inspired lamp on a glass table.

Although Grantley Hall, The Langham and Le Bristol Paris are assuredly different in style, what they share in common is their success in establishing an ambience and theme the moment a visitor walks through their doors.  Whether that be maintaining a traditional, Georgian feel as in the Grantley Hall hallway, a glittering, intimate space as in The Langham, or a fusion of both modern and traditional as in Le Bristol Paris, they all establish this in their public areas, as a reference and precursor to the rooms hidden within.

Vaughan is one of Hotel Designs’ recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image caption: Le Bristol | Image credit: Vaughan/Claire Cocano