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Gif James Dilley and James Ingram

A young architect’s Q&A: Jestico + Whiles’ James Dilley

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
A young architect’s Q&A: Jestico + Whiles’ James Dilley

In collaboration with our friends at NEWH UK Chapter, we have launched an editorial series that is aimed to bring together established designers and architects with those who are at the beginning of their career. For our first Q&A in the series, we invited young architect James Ingram to interview James Dilley, Director, Jestico + Whiles

Gif James Dilley and James Ingram

Students who are graduating from university are lost like rivers running into unknown seas. The salt water is unfamiliar and the waves are turbulent and unrelenting. And all of a sudden, as Covid-19 hit the shoreline, even the most established design studios globally were drifting uncontrollably off course.

Casualties were inevitable as the industry tried to stay afloat during the treacherous storm but even we were surprised to see leading hotel design and hospitality studios such as Wilson Associates and most recently RPW Design go under.

Hotel Designs and NEWH have teamed up to cast life rafts out to the upcoming designers and architects who have struggled to place themselves into studio life as a result – a transition that should be smooth and seamless after years of education and preparing for the long journey.

In a unique collaboration, we are working together in order to connect young designers with the industry, all while producing engaging and insightful content for our readers. In this editorial series, we are calling on young designers and architects to come face-to-face with leading industry figures in hotel design and hospitality – and no question is off limit.

To kickstart our chapter, we invited James Dilley, Director, Jestico + Whiles, who has led teams on hotel projects both in the UK and internationally, including completing projects in territories, such as Malta, Marrakesh, Berlin, Amsterdam, Tbilisi and Kyiv, to be interviewed by James Ingram, a young, hungry and talented architect who won the NEWH Ideology Award in 2019. Ingram joins Dilley following his graduation from Ravensbourne University and having just returned from an internship in Prague.

James Ingram: How do you find inspiration to make unique narratives and experiences in your designs? 

James Dilley: For me, now, I find inspiration in the people I meet. It’s wonderful that in hotel design, a lot of the owners don’t have a hotelier background. They love hotels and often it’s those people who are the visionaries. We deal with people from all walks of life – and they have entered into hospitality because they have a real passion for the industry.

When I was younger, the experience of a chain hotel was special, it was a posh, upmarket experience and it was very different to today. The very uniform style of those hotels was born out of the USA, post-war, and it was a very international (with a small ‘I’) mindset.

Overtime that would become a dated hospitality concept, and hotels began to respond to their surrounding culture and climate. These days, a hotel’s design tends to be born of locality and with the aim to create a unique sense of place.

Brand books used to be incredibly specific. Thankfully, that’s not the only way to proceed any more – and more creative concepts in hospitality are being created as conventional ideas are challenged.

“I started learning once I was flipped out of the spaceship of education and parachuted into the real world.” James Dilley, Director, Jestico + Whiles.

JI: In your early career, how did you contend with adversity and coming across hurdles in the workplace that couldn’t be mimicked as a student?

JD: To be honest, I started learning once I was flipped out of the spaceship of education and parachuted into the real world. I graduated at a time when many teachers were not designers or architects , they were teachers lecturing on design and architecture. I was passionate about interesting people and travel. Call it serendipity, but that’s the route I chose, or that chose me….

“The best design comes from challenging convention and doing things that haven’t been done before.” – James Dilley, Director, Jestico + Whiles.

JI: What’s something you wish you’d known when you first started as a designer?

James Dilley: That there isn’t a right way to do something. The best designs come from challenging convention and doing things that haven’t been done before. Innovation and creativity are therefore key. Design is not an exam where you get a tick or a cross next to your answers. It just doesn’t work like that.

JI: How do you stay up to date with current trends? 

JD: By surrounding yourself with good people. You can read, you can collect as many direct experiences as you can, but the breadth of what you need to be aware is so great that you can’t cover it all as an individual. You need to surround yourself with a team who, ideally, think differently to you,the best teams are made up of different people.

JI: Is it easier or more challenging these days to specify with more options to designers?

JD: When it comes to product design, it’s exciting to see new innovations, but over time you find yourself going back to products you specified in the past and to brands that you trust. There’s always a red line running through your design Usually you are designing similar styles so the same products fit in nicely. Designers have a responsibility to ensure they are sourcing materials ethically. Stone is an excellent example. You can select stone from anywhere in the world – you can buy blue marble from Brazil or purchase limestone from Italy for the price of wallpaper. The choice is huge but we are now more conscious around sustainability, things have to be ethically sourced, and people are becoming more innovative when sourcing these items.

Image caption: James and his team at Jestico + Whiles are currently working on designing The Island Quarter, a £650m mixed-use development in Nottingham that is set to become a new landmark for the city and the Midlands.

Image caption: James and his team at Jestico + Whiles are currently working on designing The Island Quarter, a £650m mixed-use development in Nottingham that is set to become a new landmark for the city and the Midlands.

JI: Do you tend to have favourite suppliers?

JD: One of the most important thing, for me when specifying a product, is the after service – the parts of the relationship suppliers don’t get paid for. Using stone as an example again, it’s a difficult material to work with at times. And if you have a problem then you want the supplier you sourced it from to rectify it without too much discussion. After care will certainly swing things for me when we are specifying.

JI: How do you think hotel design will change as a result of the pandemic?

JD: I hope it won’t change too much – a big part of hospitality is about sociability. You’re very rarely in an environment where you want to be isolated. Social distancing, in a basic sense where you simply distance yourself socially is not for me.

Having said that, there are some exciting things that have emerged during the pandemic, and that’s around how people live. Everyone at the moment seems to be socialising outdoors – they are having a great time, and I see brands utilising every piece of outdoor space in an imaginative way as being an exciting step forward in hospitality.

“People do not necessarily expect [nor want] indulgence if sustainability is the cost.” – James Dilley, Director, Jestico + Whiles.

Image caption: Understanding sense of place, Jestico + Whiles' design for a new-build hotel on Paul Street, London, responded directly to the area’s architectural and cultural context in the heart of Shoreditch.

Image caption: Understanding sense of place, Jestico + Whiles’ design for a new-build hotel on Paul Street, London, responded directly to the area’s architectural and cultural context in the heart of Shoreditch.

JI: Many would argue that consumers, in general, are looking for more of a premium experience. How do you balance that with incentives to become more sustainable in design and architecture?

JD: The luxury experience does not always come at a premium. Affluent people choose to stay in less traditionally “luxurious” places , not because they can’t afford to go elsewhere; people are looking for authentic experiences. This is a big move, and people do not necessarily expect [nor want] indulgence if sustainability is the cost.

A few years ago, we opened Zuri Zanzibar, for example. The social attitude to that hotel, in design and operation, is extremely important. Local people are brought into the operations in order to help them live a better life. If you are bringing in a fresh water supply or power to a part of the island that previously didn’t have one, then why wouldn’t you share that with the village?

I think there are other areas that are harder to justify. In some more traditional hotels, you will see a limo going back and forth to pick up individual guests from the airport and this is just not sustainable. Going back further, a lot of hotels and hospitality models rely on travel, which largely is not sustainable either – we can plant trees to offset the carbon that’s come from the flights but it’s not quite balanced out yet. I’m a designer of hotels, but this is a fundamental issue. Travel needs to become sustainable from top to bottom.

“Sadly, there is a lack of people in the industry wanting to give young designers and architects a chance.” – James Ingram, architect.

QUICK-FIRE ROUND

Hamish Kilburn: Who were your design idols at university?

JI: Wassily Kindinscky and in general I was inspired by forms, shapes and expression

JD: Landscape artists, such as Richard Long, Richard Serra and Andy Goldsworthy. And of course, the maestro, Carlo Scarpa.

HK: What would you both say are the most overused words at the moment?

JD: ‘Post-covid’ and ‘technology’

JI: I would say ‘technology’ too, particularly ‘parametricism’

HK: Where’s next on your travel bucket list?

JI: Realistically, somewhere within the UK, like Cornwall. Long term, I’d like to experience India and South East Asia – I want to get of this cultural bubble.

JD: Georgia is an amazing country – and also Malta.

HK: And finally, James Ingram, what is it currently like at the moment for young designers and architects graduating?

JI: Sadly, there is a lack of people in the industry wanting to give young designers and architects a chance. The job market maybe picking up but there is a reluctance for studios to help part 1 students. For example, they are all asking for a year or two experience, which is just not realistic for freshly graduated students.

JD: That’s simply not fair on the students James and I am embarrassed that the industry is taking that position. Getting cheap labour is simply not the point for Part 1 students. It should be a mutually beneficial relationship with give and take both ways. We need to allow students to learn in a live environment and we find we also have a lot to learn from our best students.

This interview is the first in a dynamic editorial series that aims to help shelter many meaningful conversations and bridge the gap between generations in architecture, design and hospitality. Thanks to NEWH, we are able to identify talented designers and architects who are currently at a disadvantage, due to the pandemic, graduating from university with a lack of opportunities. If you would like to contribute to this series, please email the editorial desk.

Main image credit: James Ingram/James Dilley/Jestico + Whiles

Lobby-Bar crop Hyatt House Tampa

In pictures: Inside Hyatt House/Hyatt Place Tampa Downtown

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In pictures: Inside Hyatt House/Hyatt Place Tampa Downtown

Tampa in Florida welcomes a new dual-branded development, which shelters Hyatt Place and Hyatt House, to its thriving hospitality scene. Editor Hamish Kilburn takes a look inside both hotels that were designed and recently unveiled by Stonehill Taylor

Lobby-Bar crop Hyatt House Tampa

In the heart of Tampa, directly across the street from its historic City Hall sits the new  dual branded hospitality development that features the 230-key Hyatt Place and the 115-key Hyatt House. In addition, the complex encompasses 3,200 square feet of ground-floor retail space and 4,000 square feet of meeting space. All public space is shared by the guests of the two brands, and guestrooms are integrated throughout the new 17-story building.

Leading architecture and interior design firm, Stonehill Taylor, which recently took part in Hotel Designs‘ latest roundtable, was charged with the design of the guestrooms and public spaces. Using a complementary colour scheme of jewel tones and citrus shades, the hotel features bright, sun-kissed spaces, and high-contrast patterns that create an ambiance that is uniquely Tampa. The design pillars explore concepts of indulgence; exoticism; and majesty—believed to capture the city’s longstanding allure to travellers looking for a tropical, yet culturally diverse escape.

Since you’re here, why not read Stonehill Taylor’s thoughts on the new era of lifestyle?

As soon as guests enter the lobby, they are greeted by an oversized gold textured piece depicting an abstract scene with birds and leaves. Panels line the wall behind the reception desk and feature tropical leaf-infused patterned artwork, while the reception desk is decorated in tropical leaf tiles.

Image of lobby in Tampa Florida Hyatt House/Hyatt Place

Image credit: Taggart Sorenson

Adjacent to the reception area is a bar and lounge complete with a mix of citrus colours and blue tones. The bar’s backsplash features an array of bohemian tiles. The surrounding dining areas have tables with metal detailing and a range of seating from banquettes to freestanding chairs. A series of vintage Cuban movie posters grace the space.

The ground floor also includes a business centre with a gallery and pre-function space, and several meeting rooms. The art throughout this area includes a wall sculpture made with rattan circles in varied sizes and a series of embroidered vintage postcards from Florida.

The business centre has pendant lighting and eclectic inset floor patterns and partitions the space using screens. The adjacent gallery space, meanwhile, has plush love seats, side chairs with ottomans that double as tables and acoustical ceiling panels. The carpet in the meeting rooms depicts leaf patterns—a theme also echoed by the leaf patterned walls with wainscoting. Custom geometric pendant lighting illuminates these ballroom-like spaces.

At the elevator lobby is a custom artwork featuring cubed versions of Florida maps mounted on a linen background and framed in a shadowbox frame. The elevators further provide an artful moment with bold black-and-white tiled flooring, blackened steel door frames, as well as a back-lit ceiling concept. Guestroom corridors have carpets with hidden tropical elements, such as bees and panthers. A graphic printed map of Tampa covers the walls familiarising guests with the city’s focal points. Hidden elements also surprise in the Hyatt House guestrooms. When lit, these rooms show a violet-hued wall with tone-on-tone patterns. Furnishings are all custom and feature two-colour finishes and extra trim to elevate their aesthetic. A kitchenette with decorative tiles accentuates the layout of these rooms.

Close up of bed and floral artwork in guestroom

Image credit: Taggart Sorenson

In the Hyatt Place rooms, there are exuberant green tones. Similar to the Hyatt House rooms, there is a tone-on- tone wall covering, this time featuring light leaf patterns. The carpeting similarly plays with the fun colours of Tampa.

Pool at Hyatt House in Tampa

Image credit: Taggart Sorenson

On the fifth floor is the outdoor pool with tangerine and lime-coloured furnishings and neutral tiling—the pool deck is framed by a painted mural. A fitness centre, located on the fourth floor, has a playful custom mural featuring bold, brightly coloured patterns with a motivational text component that forms of a centrepiece of the room.

Main image credit: Hyatt Hotels/Taggart Sorenson

DESIGN POD EP4 with Jack Irving

LISTEN NOW: Episode 4 of DESIGN POD explores fashion & design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
LISTEN NOW: Episode 4 of DESIGN POD explores fashion & design

Episode 4 of DESIGN POD is now live! In the this episode, in association with Bathroom Brands Group, editor Hamish Kilburn and co-host Harriet Forde welcome designer Jack Irving as the show’s special guest. Having created outfits for the likes of Lady Gaga, Paris Hilton, The Spice Girls and more, Irving discusses fashion highlight, collaboration goals and the result of his debut interior design project. This is what happens when fashion and design meet…

DESIGN POD EP4 with Jack Irving

Often interior designers and architects admit that they are inspired by the energy and buzz that radiates from the fashion industry. The quick conveyer-belt of collections – blink and you will miss this season’s frocks and colours– naturally allows boundaries to be stretched and incubated creativity to explode onto the runway. And yet, it is rare (not unheard of, though) for the two industries to work in harmony.

In episode 4 of DESIGN POD, editor Hamish Kilburn and co-host Harriet Forde meet a designer who, for many reasons, is an inspiration in both arenas. Jack Irving was just 21-years-old, a student still at Saint Martins College of Art and Design, when his dream collaboration came true. The iconic ‘Mother Monster’ herself, Lady Gaga, had seen his otherworldly designs and asked him to create an outfit that she would wear on the final night of her Art Pop world tour in Paris. Rising the occasion, Irving created the Sea Urchin Showgirl inflatable dress.

Since then, Lady Gaga as well as other celebrities such as Paris Hilton, The Spice Girls have worn many of his pieces. In order not the limit himself – nor draw attention away to the visionary fashion designers – Irving does not consider himself a fashion designer. Instead, following his studies in performance design, we prefer to use the terms ‘storyteller’ and ‘fantasist’. “Whatever term used, it would be remise of anyone to not consider Jack a visionary in both worlds of fashion and design,” said Editor Hamish Kilburn who first interviewed Irving in 2019. “As impressive as his fashion portfolio is, it is Jack’s entry into interior design that inspired the title of this episode – and indeed Hotel Designs closely following his journey.”

To amplify a guestroom renovation inside W London, the hotel teamed up with Irving to create a limited-edition pillow collection. Taking inspiration straight from the catwalk and remixing it with the bold attitude of W London, the spiked pillows, available in every guestroom of the hotel, appear muted to the naked eye until they are brought to life through the click of a camera flash. Through the lens, the smart fabric transforms into an iridescent masterpiece. And it was this fashion-forward, daring and raw talent that the DESIGN POD producers wanted to capture in this episode.

Listen to the full episode here:

The next DESIGN POD episode, which will drop next month, will invite the design duo at Carden Cunietti to explore the theme of creativity crafted.

Weekly briefing: A lesson in lifestyle, wellness trends and a new disruptive brand

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Weekly briefing: A lesson in lifestyle, wellness trends and a new disruptive brand

Editor Hamish Kilburn here with your fast-tracked round-up of this week’s hotel design headlines. In this edition of the weekly briefing, we’re sharing our latest roundtable, exploring a new brand that is said to ‘revolutionise hospitality’ and we have just opened nominations for The Brit List Awards 2021…

In the same week Hotel Designs broadcasted its fourth edition of Hotel Designs LIVE to a sea of designers, architects, hoteliers and developers from across the globe, a handful of important headlines dropped into the inbox of the editorial desk and soon become published articles in our Industry News section of the website.

Just in case you missed this week’s most-read news stories and features, here is your weekly briefing…

Virtual roundtable: Raising the floor in lifestyle

Image caption: A suite inside Ace Brooklyn, designed by Stonehill Taylor

Image caption: A suite inside Ace Brooklyn, designed by Stonehill Taylor

As we enter what is no doubt going to be considered as ‘a new era of lifestyle’, Hotel Designs, in association with flooring brand Milliken, welcomes world-leading designers from around the globe to explore how the lane for lifestyle in hotel design and hospitality is widening.

With the aim to understand more about the future of this growing sector hospitality, we gathered a handful of the industry’s finest to explore how we can indeed raise the floor in lifestyle.

Meet the panel: 

Read more.

Hotel spas – what tomorrow’s travellers expect

Tierra Chiloé Spa & Wellness Resort: Chile

Image credit: Tierra Chiloé Spa & Wellness Resort: Chile

In her second article with Hotel Designs – the first looking at public areas post-pandemic – Emma Cook explores how the cultural shift that we have experienced over the last year will impact modern traveller demands in hotel spas and wellness areas.

Read more.

The Other House: The new luxury/lifestyle brand ‘revolutionising hospitality’

The Other House in Covent Garden

Image credit: The Other House

Naomi Heaton, CEO of The Portfolio Club, dropped the name of the company’s new lifestyle brand and residents’ clubs during a panel discussion at Hotel Designs LIVEThe Other House will launch in the Spring of 2022 with a stunning property in South Kensington. Then, in 2023, London’s famed Covent Garden neighbourhood will welcome the brand’s next hotel.

The Brit List Awards 2021: Nominations now open (and free)!

The free nomination/application process for The Brit List Awards 2021 is now officially open, as Hotel Designs’ nationwide search to identify the true leaders operating in the hotel design and hospitality arena in Britain begins. The awards, which has become a major campaign to support diversity and raw talent that stretches across the British design, architecture and hospitality landscape, is expected to be bigger than ever before – climaxing with a live awards ceremony that will take place on November 3 at Proud Embankment, London.

Read more.

In the HIX seat: Introducing HIX Works

Profile image of Joel Butler, Co-founder of HIX

Joel Butler, Co-founder of HIX Event and our monthly columnist, explains all the exclusive details around HIX Works that will launch in November 2021.

Read more.

Since you’re here…

More than 40,000 readers per month enjoy the content we publish on Hotel Designs. Our mission is to define the point on international hotel design, and we are doing that by serving relevant news stories and engaging features. To keep up to date on the hottest stories that are emerging, you can sign up to the newsletter, which is completely free of charge. As well as receiving a weekly round-up of the top stories, you will also access our bi-monthly HD Edit –staying ahead of the curve has never been so easy!

Click here to sign up to our newsletter.

Main image credit: Renaissance New York Chelsea

Hotel Designs LIVE: Wellness panel

(In video) Hotel Designs LIVE: The new era of wellness

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
(In video) Hotel Designs LIVE: The new era of wellness

The final session at Hotel Designs LIVE, which took place on February 23, focused the lens on wellness. Armed with the knowledge shared in the previous sessions, editor Hamish Kilburn invited world-renowned designers and architects to discuss how wellbeing should be sheltered in hotel design…

Hotel Designs LIVE: Wellness panel

The third Hotel Designs LIVE came to a fitting close on February 23 with a panel discussion to ultimately explore how designers and architects will create moments of bliss inside the luxury and lifestyle hotels of tomorrow. Maintaining a two-metre distance from conversations around hygiene and Covid-19, instead, the session was inspired by modern travellers’ demands for authentic, personalised and non-curated travel experiences.

To kickstart the session, editor Hamish Kilburn explained how he selected the panel. “Each and every person on the virtual sofa is challenging conventional wellness design,” he said,  “as well as opening up new opportunities in regards to hotel and hospitality experiences.”

On the panel: 

Wellness panel at Hotel Designs LIVE

Following introductions, Kilburn asked the panel about challenges and pitfalls to avoid when injecting wellness into urban environments and landscapes before he and the designers and architects scrutinised and made sense out of architecture and hospitality trends that will ultimately evolve the way in which wellness is perceived in hotel design. Within this discussion, as in previous sessions throughout the day, technology was arguably at the heart of each and every point and example that was made – whether that be stripping tech back to its bones or considering meaningful and intuitive lighting to enhance the guests’ experiences.

Here’s the full recording of the panel discussion, which has been edited by CUBE and includes Product Watch pitches from Franklite, Utopia Projects, Geberit, Atlas Concorde and Inspired By Design.

We have now published all highlights and recordings from Hotel Designs LIVE. These include: 

SAVE THE DATE: Hotel Designs LIVE will return for a fourth edition on May 11, 2021, putting topics such as lifestyle, bathrooms, art and workspace under the spotlight. In the meantime, if you would like to discuss sponsorship opportunities, focused Product Watch pitches or the concept of Hotel Designs LIVE, please contact Katy Phillips or call +44 (0) 1992 374050.

Since you’re here…

More than 40,000 readers per month enjoy the content we publish on Hotel Designs. Our mission is to define the point on international hotel design, and we are doing that by serving relevant news stories and engaging features. To keep up to date on the hottest stories that are emerging, you can sign up to the newsletter, which is completely free of charge. As well as receiving a weekly round-up of the top stories, you will also access our bi-monthly HD Edit –staying ahead of the curve has never been so easy!

Click here to sign up to our newsletter.

Product watch: Ceiling light collection from Chelsom

834 788 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: Ceiling light collection from Chelsom

From the looks of things in the Edition 27 collection, which launched last year, Chelsom likes to give designers plenty to play with. With this in mind, Hotel Designs takes a sneak peek at the diverse range of ceiling light options the brand offers…

Every hotel or cruise ship needs a statement chandelier and this eclectic collection has been carefully created to cater for all budgets and applications, taking design aesthetics to the next level without compromising on function and efficiency.

Hello VETRO: a seamless fusion of design and function

Slender disks in brushed brass and sculptured glass create a timeless, elegant design that makes the range extremely versatile for any application in hospitality and marine environments.

This statement pendant dramatically illuminates the surrounding area with each facet of the sculpted glass catching the light creating a striking light effect that is a statement in itself.

Chelsom is one of our recommended suppliers and regularly feature in our Supplier News section of the website. If you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips.

Main image credit: Chelsom

Main image for Hotel Designs LIVE

Last chance to sign up to Hotel Designs LIVE

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Last chance to sign up to Hotel Designs LIVE

Hotel Designs LIVE, the one-day virtual conference for designers, architects, hoteliers and developers, takes place on Tuesday February 23 – and it will shelter four engaging panel discussions with world-renowned hospitality and design experts…

Main image for Hotel Designs LIVE

In just a couple of days Hotel Designs LIVE, which has just been shortlisted at the Digital Event Awards for its consistent series, will return to keep the conversation flowing and in the industry connected.

Designers, architects, hoteliers and developers attend free – click here to sign up (booking form takes less than two minutes to complete). Click here to read the agenda for the day.

Hosted and moderated by editor Hamish Kilburn, the event will shelter live interviews and panel discussions with handpicked industry experts from firms such as Conran and Partners, Bergman Interiors, Space Copenhagen, PLP Architecture, Perkins&Will, Goddard Littlefair, SB Architects, EPR Architects and many more.

Here are five reasons to attend Hotel Designs LIVE.

In addition, to ensure that the event is bridging the gap between hospitality suppliers and designers, architects, hoteliers and developers – the conference will also include structured ‘Product Watch’ pitches within each session, allowing the audience to hear about the latest innovations to emerge in the hotel design arena.

If you are a designer, architect, hotelier  or developer and would like to secure your complimentary seats in the audience, click here.

If you are a supplier to the hotel design industry and would like to promote your latest product or services to the Hotel Designs LIVE audience, please contact Katy Phillips via email or call +44 (0)1992 374050.

Main image credit: Unsplash

 

Milano by Robert Holden

In Conversation With: The man who designed the ‘most stylish’ hotel in Crete

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: The man who designed the ‘most stylish’ hotel in Crete

Ahead of the official opening of CAYO Exclusive Resort and Spa – a new property that is known locally as the most stylish hotel in Crete – we caught up with the projects designer, Gian Paolo Venier to discuss design detail and decor must-haves…

Milano by Robert Holden

In summer last year, we gave our readers the first sneak peek inside CAYO Exclusive Resort and Spa.

Taking luxury, gastronomy and design to a new level on the island, the property, which is just a stone’s throw from sought-after Elounda, the hotel will open later this year with a mind-body balancing spa, four gastronomic restaurants, stylish rooms, suites and villas with private plunge pools and unrivalled vistas of Spinalonga Island.

Image of hotel surrounding natural landscape of Crete

Image credit: CAYO

Drawing from a calming and neutral palette, interior designer Gian Paolo Venier has blended cool greys, soft blues and greens with brushed marble, chic glass and stone in a nod toward the historical locale and architecture of nearby ancient city of Olous.

To understand more about the design narrative, we caught up with the designer himself.

Hotel Design: What were your first thoughts when you were presented with the concept of CAYO?

Gian Paolo Venier: I was excited. The location is astonishing, and the brief I was presented with was both stimulating and challenging – not only was it a huge project, almost all the rooms are different. The architecture balanced perfectly with the landscape following a simple, timeless approach. I saw the project as a blank canvas, and couldn’t wait to create its own unique personality.

Image credit: CAYO

The cherry on top of the cake for me was Cayo’s location, my beloved country of Greece, where I have spent a lot of time over the years and become increasingly familiar with its islands. I am in love with the people, lifestyle, landscape, colours… and Meltemi (the Greek wind)! It is one of the places I feel happiest and truly at home. The project began in Paris, I met with the owners for lunch, and they introduced me to CAYO. We clicked right from the offset and soon become friends, then accomplices.

image of wicker light shades in contemporary restaurant in the CAYO hotel in Crete

Image credit: CAYO

HD: CAYO’s surroundings clearly play a big part in the property’s design. Can you tell us more about the process of creating hotel interiors that reflect the natural surroundings?

GPV: With all of my projects I take lots of inspiration from the destination and try to reflect it as much as possible through my design. I enjoy finding parallels between the land and the culture, and in Cayo’s case, the landscape is so prevalent that it would be impossible not to centre the design on the property’s beautiful surroundings. For the facade of the building, we created a colour palette that complimented the surroundings. We wanted to ensure CAYO blended into the landscape and create a soft transition from nature to architecture. We incorporated pebbles within the design, as they’re traditionally used in Greece for flooring and opted to use them inside playing around with the dimensions.

Image from terrace overviewing the sea and private pool in Crete

Image credit: CAYO

For the guestrooms, the approach was completely different. All the rooms boast a view of the sea and the islet of Spinalonga, so during the summer months the rooms will be filled with light, with this in mind we created a colour palette that supported the Cretan sun to prevent any harsh contrasts. This end result features lots of pastel colours that blend together whilst showcasing the view.

HD: What’s your favourite design element of CAYO?

GPV: It’s so hard to choose as nearly all elements of the property, from the furniture to light fittings, were custom-made during this project. I love the three-floor chandelier in the main staircase, made of bamboo cages and hundreds of hammered aluminium butterflies. It embodies freedom and is a subtle reminder to the guest to “feel free!”. Another highlight is

the handcrafted pottery we installed in the lobby. The pots were sourced from local potters and the idea was to spark people’s curiosity and perhaps initiate a visit to the local workshop where the pots are still produced today by hand – ultimately telling a story through design.

HD: One of CAYO’s USPs is that each suite/room boasts a view of the ocean. Was it important for you to emphasise this through your design?

GPV: This was compulsory! It made my job so much easier as I already had the focal point, it was just a case of showcasing this through the design. The view from Cayo is so unique and I didn’t want to take away from this by making the design too loud. I like to think
of Cayo’s design as ‘whispered’ it embraces the natural surroundings instead of forcing itself upon them. Being blessed with the view is like having a Monet painting in each room – you simply design around it! The ambience has already been created; you just need to follow.

A modern and stylish guestroom inside CAYO Exclusive Resort and Spa

Image credit: CAYO Exclusive Resort and Spa

HD: Natural colours or bright and bold?

GPV: My projects always result in a balance of freshness and joy through the use of colours. The mix of colours depends on the context, the project, the relevance, and the idea that guides the concept. I don’t tend to apply one rule to all of my clients and sometimes I’m surprised by the palettes I create, and I don’t think I’d be a good designer if I wasn’t!

HD: How should we find inspiration when it comes to design? What inspires you?

GPV: When you do this job with passion, you never stop analysing, observing, and cataloguing everything you see. It is an exercise that becomes second nature, and travelling is one of the greatest tools to seek inspiration. It’s the part of my job that brings me the most joy. To discover, meet, investigate, and then return, translate, and redesign. This is an infinite exercise that I find incredibly beneficial.

HD: Do you have any advice for budding home designers?

GPV: During the first lesson at the university, my design professor told us: “You have to experience everything. You cannot design anything if you don’t know and have no experience.” We were very young, and perhaps we did not understand what it meant to experience different contrasts – be that sleeping in a luxury hotel and then trying a hostel or eating in a Michelin- starred restaurant and then a Tavern. Through analysing and acknowledging we can truly understand the meaning of experiences. My professor’s words have always guided me and still ring true today.

A window from guestroom into a pool

Image credit: CAYO

HD: When it comes to décor, what one item should we all have?

GPV: In 1908, Adolf Loos wrote in his book “Ornament and Crime” that he told his clients not to redesign their new house completely. Instead, he advised them to bring at least three family objects. These three “errors”, as he referred to them, gave the project a touch of humanity and history. I think this means that a “must-have” item must be something personal, which helps define our identity. It doesn’t matter what it is. The important thing is that it represents us or tells something about our history and or identity.

Main image credit: Robert Holden

Collage of ME Dubai, including the exterior of the building, the sleek bedrooms and the luxury pool area

Checking in to ME Dubai, the ‘legacy project’ of Zaha Hadid

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Checking in to ME Dubai, the ‘legacy project’ of Zaha Hadid

We set renowned furniture designer Rock Galpin a comfortable mission to kickstart the year: to write the exclusive design review of ME Dubai, the brainchild of the late Zaha Hadid, which has become the destination’s latest architectural marvel…

Collage of ME Dubai, including the exterior of the building, the sleek bedrooms and the luxury pool area

Being a designer myself, and familiar with the pioneering and expansive body of work of Zaha Hadid since her very first project, I was very much looking forward to reviewing the recently opened ME Dubai, which is sheltered inside The Opus.

Known as Hadid’s ‘legacy project’, ME Dubai is the only hotel in the world to have both its interiors and exteriors designed by Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) – and its futuristic architecture, characterised by curves, sharp angles and bold materials epitomises the studio’s unique design style.

An exterior shot of the Opus

Image caption: Set in Dubai’s Burj Khalifa district, the Opus is a mixed-use mirrored glass building, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, that shelters ME Hotel’s latest property. | Image credit: ME Dubai

Inside the 93-key hotel you can find lighting, furniture, patterns, bespoke-shaped products, rugs and seamless features and detailing, all of which have been designed by the forward-thinking studio – it really is a celebration of Hadid’s full scope of work and will be remembered, no doubt, for this.

Following Hadid’s passing, Christos Passas, who recently won Architect of the Year at The Brit List Awards 2020, was responsible for the project that aimed to ‘leave its mark’ in the urban space of Dubai. “I think the idea of having a coherent approach, to both interior and exterior design, is very compelling and indeed it requires a whole lot of commitment by the designer,” he told Hotel Designs. “We were given the opportunity to transit intellectually and emotionally from an architectural, large scale project to the finer details of the building that have to do with the user interfaces and the experience of the visitor. Such a context can allow designers to develop more holistic experiences for the user and to express the clients vision in a much more consistent and eloquent way.”

First impressions count

Having recovered in awe from taking in the huge glass cube facade and amorphic structure of the building in person, the entrance into the hotel itself is subtle and aptly plays down your reaction to what is to follow, with its minimal led forecourt dot lights, at night, tracing a suggested route to the door for cars. The proceeding experience, as you head into the reception is simply quite special.

Approaching the lobby, I was not surprised to be suitably impressed by the vast and completely and utterly unique parametric design styling of the four-storey atrium.

An image to show the expansive atrium inside the ME Dubai

Image caption: The expansive atrium inside the ME Dubai, which is a strong first impression. | Image credit: ME Dubai

“Here, all the rules are broken and re-written with inspiring results.”

Sweeping and fluid mezzanine balconies flow in rhythm around all floors, traced by a light channel and a sloped-in continuous glass railing at an impossible angle. There are so many examples of bold innovation and experimentation which demonstrate very advanced design vision and engineering feats indeed. Hadid’s undulating, fluid and visually engaging design typology references, for me, a soft bio mimicry that clearly push the technological boundaries of materials, fabrication and build possibilities. Here the rules are not only being broken they are being re-written with inspiring results.

Whilst the atrium is an addictive dream for any photographer, myself included, it does somehow feel perhaps lacking a little something if it’s aiming to house a ‘warm’ hotel reception. Therefore, I question whether the design in this space is too hard – are softer acoustics and materials absent? Some would argue that as a hotel lobby, the space is too sparse (or too white perhaps).

Close up of furniture in the atrium at ME Dubai

Image caption: ME Dubai is the only hotel in the world only hotel in the world to have both its interiors and exteriors designed by Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA). | Image credit: ME Dubai

The large oval-shaped seating zones carefully positioned around, which feature built-in sweeping curved sofas, provide neat social areas that create necessary micro enclaves of activity. These softer social spaces, within a vastly white atrium, work well but feel almost not enough to create warmth, softness and a welcoming feeling. In fact, it feels a little sterile – a tad cold – but nonetheless, no one can argue against this space being spectacular! When the hotel is up to speed, with a healthy occupancy and the vibrancy and colour of many guests, it may fill that void.

“If you love progressive architecture and interior design that pushes the boundaries, bringing interior typology and technology closer to us, then you will no doubt be impressed with ME Dubai.”

QUICK-FIRE ROUND

Hotel Designs: What will you remember most about the hotel?
Rock Galpin: The dynamic and compelling relationship between architecture and interior design and the emotive impact that this parametric based design has when experienced first hand.

HD: What should guests experience when checking in?
RG: DESEO Restaurant, bar and pool complete with Ibiza DJ, and the Wagu steak and Rum sponge. The 18:00 ‘lights on’ till 00:00 where the building’s facade comes to life with LEDs – most notable is the inner ‘hole’ which is more intensely lit.

HK: What could be improved?
RG: The extreme, experimental interior is impressive to say the least, however, there needs to be a further appraisal of how people feel in this space; how they react, how they interact and their needs in order to improve guest engagement. Despite the staff being lovely, the service throughout the hotel was, when I checked in at least, a little erratic.

HK: What was your favourite area of the hotel?
RG: DESEO restaurant and bar and of course the atrium.

HK: Can you describe the hotel in a sentence or two?
RG: This is a unique and inspiring hotel to be experienced first-hand. If you love progressive architecture and interior design that pushes the boundaries, bringing interior typology and technology closer to us, then you will no doubt be impressed with ME Dubai.

Between spaces, an often-forgotten part of the hotel experience

There’s a lovely journey to be had when walking from your room to most parts of the hotel, as you’re pleasurably forced to walk along the atrium mezzanines taking in beautiful elevated views of the upper floors. Aside from the DESEO restaurant and pool area, there is a distinctive lack of outdoor space in the hotel, so you do feel somewhat incubated with some light passing through the atrium roof.

Guestrooms and Suites

I had the opportunity to explore two category rooms; the standard Aura room at 47m squared and the much larger Personality Suite at 92m square. There are two colour schemes. Desert is much more subtle – think spiritual and cool. Meanwhile, the Midnight Blue scheme is deeper and more intimate that also packs a masculine punch. Both are equally as beautiful and any decision for either style will be down to personal preference.

Aura Room

The first impression of the generously sized Aura room was of light – there’s lots of it – from floor-to-ceiling windows which span the width of the whole room. The beds are quite something! Not only are they large, but they are super comfortable, with an angled cushioned Alcantara headrest at 45 degrees, which works really well.

The built-in cantilever bedside tables are a well-considered feature – there are no ugly plug sockets in sight. Instead, these are hidden under the table with a useful, minimal touchtronic operated black light arm sprouting upwards from the tables, with two useful USB ports at the base. The bed base also features flat areas to the frame that extend useful seats, which works well with the complementary, asymmetric matching rug underneath.

“No wall was perpendicular to another.”

As I started to look more at the interior, I was surprised to realised that no wall was perpendicular to another and that many materials are cut on the angle or applied in complex shapes. The full marble bathroom, for example, white in the Aura and black in the Personality Suites, runs on the diagonal in both directions, so the pieces are actually rhombus shaped. These features very much reflect the entire design approach, to experiment and push the limits of what has conventionally been done up until now.

Personality Suite

The Personality Suite, similar to the Passion Suite, is 92m square and is one of the hotels larger mid-level rooms. It’s differentiated by a separate lounge/dining area and two bathrooms, one with bath, double sinks and shower cubicle the other with toilet, bidet and another sink. The Midnight Blue suite felt special. The deep blues and darker colour scheme had more contrast to that of the Desert scheme. The black and white quartz streaked marble throughout the whole bathroom is beautiful, offset by the amorphic ZHA shaped double sink and mirrors, with parametric laser etched patination.

“The technology in the rooms match the design form in being progressive.”

All bathroom fittings are designed by ZHA and follow suit to studio’s typology. The technology in the rooms match the design form in being progressive, with touch plates on many walls for the double-skinned electric curtains and lighting throughout. In fact, download the ME Hotels App and you have full mobile electrical control of the entire suite, including the two large TVs.

The lounge area, complete with the boomerang shaped ZHA sofa and beautifully crafted dark wood desk blended in and, looks aesthetically harmonious. However, the comfort and desire to want to use this space was sorely missing. The sofas are extremely hard, no doubt to retain the sculpted form, but off-putting in terms of comfort and relaxation, where the lounge should be king.

Image caption: A ZHA designed sofa in one of the Midnight Blue themed suites in the hotel.

Image caption: A ZHA designed sofa in one of the Midnight Blue themed suites. | Image credit: ME Dubai

The F&B experience

The F&B journey within the luxury hotel starts on the ground floor. Botanica, described as a gin bar, features an Italian accent throughout and doubles as a lunchtime restaurant. It occupies part of the lobby, where the reception dominates with its music, reverberation and activity that is heard through the pale-slatted wooden walls of the bar. The space is soft, comfortable and pleasant, lending itself more to a relaxed lounge bar/restaurant.

Meanwhile, Central is the designated breakfast restaurant that seems quite lifeless outside of breakfast time, inward looking to the Atrium, which gives you the opportunity to take more of those lovely views in. This would seem a hard, austere place for a morning bite, however, despite the reverberation from lower down, the experience was actually very pleasant being relaxed and quite peaceful.

Where the Botanica, on the ground floor, is perhaps lacking some atmosphere, DESEO makes up for it ten-fold – in fact it is real contrast in most ways and a very welcome part of the hotel experience. This is where the up-tempo vibes lives.

The design of the restaurant uses Downtown skyscrapers as a backdrop and contrasts this with a leafy green design scheme that is simply lovely. With a raised freestanding bar and a wooden pergola adorned by a thousand wind cones, the impression was of movement and energy, mix that with a DJ on an Ibiza-style white podium – his back to a rectangular pool lined by sun loungers one side, slatted cabana’s the other – you realise DESEO has what it takes.

The gym is a generous in size and a pleasant space to work up a good sweat. there is also a sauna, which is an intimate small, pined welcome addition. On the fourth floor, a little bit out the way, but worth a trip just for the quirky space complete with high tech curved glass, as it’s on the cusp of the atrium’s ceiling curving into the vertical inner ‘void’ wall is a specialist massage treatment facility.

An industrial-styled gym in ME Dubai

Image caption: The hotel features a state-of-the-art industrial-style gym. | Image credit: ME Dubai

In addition, and not to be missed, there are two excellent restaurants, which are also part of The Opus building. The Maine is a big favourite of mine, from interior to food quality, and Roka restaurant is also a fantastic new asset to the local area.

Standing out in a city like Dubai, which is no shrinking violet, is one thing. But sheltering an interior design scheme that is equally as impressive as its architecture is an almost impossible task. The interior design scheme inside ME Dubai seamlessly compliments the buildings unique architectural form and meets, I would argue, the ever-changing demands of modern travellers and in-the-know locals alike.

Over and out,

Rock.

Main image credit: ME Dubai

Hottest hotel openings arriving in 2021 (Q3 & Q4)

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Hottest hotel openings arriving in 2021 (Q3 & Q4)

Dubbed ‘The Hot List’ by our readers, we start every year as mean to go on; with a positive mindset to get ahead of the curve to reveal what we believe will be the hottest hotel openings of 2021. Following on from part one, which was published last week, here are our Q3 & Q4 VIP arrivals. Editor Hamish Kilburn writes…

The hospitality industry continues to be tested to its limits as the UK, a major design and travel hotspot, has once again been plunged into a national lockdown. Despite the cause for concern among already established hotel businesses, the hotel construction industry continues to develop what will be the future hotels. To keep spirits high as the demand for travel will return in 2021, it is time to pick up from where we left off in the first article of this series that referenced the VIP hotel openings of Q1 and Q2. Going beneath the surface to unveil some true gems, here’s your guided tour of the hotels that will open in Q3 and Q4 that we expect will cause the most disruption on the international hotel design scene this year.

Rosewood São Paulo – opening Q3, 2021

Image of the exterior of Rosewood Sao Paulo hotel

Image credit: Rosewood Hotels

2020 was a pivotal year for the Rosewood Hotels brand, with announcements of new properties in the Caribbean, Sardinia, Spain and Amsterdam. 2021 will see little change of momentum as the brand prepares to open what is arguably it’s most interesting architectural project to date.

Mirroring the energy and heritage of Brazil, Rosewood São Paulo is said to be an “urban oasis” situated in Cidade Matarazzo, a complex of elegantly preserved buildings from the early 20th century. The 180-key luxury hotel – with rooms designed by none other than Philippe Starck – will anchor this stylish, mixed-use cultural destination, occupying one of the area’s few remaining historical landmarks and a striking new vertical garden tower designed by Jean Nouvel.

Reykjavik EDITION – opening Q3, 2021

Rendering of the EDITION hotel in Iceland

Image credit: EDITION Hotels

Narrowly missing its previously scheduled arrival date in 2020, the EDITION brand – which is the brainchild of designer Ian Schrager – is preparing to touch down in Reykjavik this summer! The hotel, which will become the brand’s fourth property in Europe is expected to shelter Schrager’s signature home-from-home luxury style with a curated taste of the locale, reflecting the best of the area’s cultural and social miliieu.

Cayo Exclusive Resort & Spa – opening Q3, 2021

With sustainability on the radar despite the pandemic’s best efforts, Cayo Exclusive Resort & Spa, which softly opened in 2020, will open fully this year as a modern, ecologically sensitive, luxurious resort born out of passionate love in the art of traveling. Cayo’s vibe and feel are the results of thoughtful consideration of the spiritual, cultural, and natural environment.

The accommodation’s striking architectural design uses Greece’s ample sunlight to heighten the beauty of the surrounding hills and the famous islet of Spinalonga, a candidate for the UNESCO List of World Heritage Site.

Known locally as ‘Crete’s most stylish hotel’, its eco-friendly design and bioclimatic architecture highlight the local climate’s beneficial features. The ground slope was put in use to achieve optimal air and light exposure to the resort’s indoors and outdoors areas.

Ritz-Carlton Maldives, Fari Island – opening Q3, 2021

Arial view of Ritz Carlton hotel in Maldives

Image credit: Ritz-Carlton

Set within an integrated development that cleverly bridges together three islands, Ritz-Carlton Maldives, Fari Islands takes a minimalist approach to luxury. Modern design highlights sea views and pristine beaches; simple ingredients are transformed by skilled chefs and mixologists; healing is guided by directional energy and nature is explored with respect and wonder.

Bvlgari Hotel Paris – opening Q3, 2021

Render of Bvlgari Hotel Paris

Image credit: Bvlgari Hotels

The seventh property to join the collection, Bvlgari Hotel Paris will offer 76 rooms, most of them suites, while the hotel will feature a full range of luxury facilities, including a spa with 25m pool, a Bvlgari restaurant and a bar looking out onto a charming courtyard garden. The new luxury hotel, which is positioned on Avenue George V (between the Champs Elysees and the Avenue Montaigne), is a collaboration between the Italian architectural firm Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel, and the renowned Parisian architects Valode & Pistre. The design of the building has been conceived as a transition to modernity – in keeping with Parisian style with traditional limestone and honouring the building’s 19th century history, while also creating a contemporary look with a renewed façade. 

The Paris property is the next hotel opening for the brand with Rome, Miami, Moscow and Tokyo also on the horizon in the coming years.

Four Seasons Resort Tamarindo – opening Q4, 2021

A render of the eco architecturally structured hotel overlooking the ocean

Image credit: Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts

Following last year’s development demand in Mexico’s Riviera Nayarit, further south is a hidden gem that is about to become the stage for the arrival of Four Seasons’ next luxury property. The hidden eco reserve on Mexico’s Costa Alegre – the pristine coastline between Puerto Vallarta and Manzanillo – is where dense jungle rainforest meets the Pacific Ocean. Four Seasons Resort Tamarindo will feature modern, organic architecture that defines three distinct enclaves: a protected beachfront for families, a panoramic clifftop for adults, and a private hideaway immersed in greenery.

Nobu Hotel Marrakech – opening Q4, 2021

Image of Marrakech mosque

Image credit: Nobu Hotel Marrakech

Becoming the brand’s debut property in Africa, Nobu Hotel Marrakech will be situated in the Hivernage district, steps from the historic heart of the city, souks and vibrant Djemaa el-Fna. The 71-key hotel will house contemporary guestrooms and suites, a selection of dynamic dining venues and rooftop spaces, a 2,000 sq. ft luxurious spa and fitness centre, indoor and outdoor swimming pools and meeting and event space.

LXR Hotels & Resorts, Roku Kyoto – opening Q4, 2021

Render of LXR Hotels & Resorts, Roku Kyoto hotel in Tokyo

Image credit: LXR Hotels & Resorts

With the Tokyo 2020 Olympics rescheduled for this year and Kyoto sitting just two hours by bullet train from the capital, the cultural heart of Japan is gearing up to welcome international visitors. Situated in an area home to some of the region’s most idyllic Japanese gardens, historic architecture and authentic tea houses, Roku Kyoto will be the first property in Asia under Hilton’s luxury LXR brand. Opening in the second half of 2021, the resort is expected to offer “a luxurious and refreshing stay” with fine dining restaurants and spa treatments paired with natural hot springs.

Langham Gold Coast – Opening Q4, 2021

Sheltered inside the central and tallest of the three landmark towers of the Jewel development, which first and largest development with direct beach access to be built in the coastal city within the last 30 years, The Langham, Gold Coast will become the brand’s third luxury address in Australia.

The grand structure and shimmering exterior of the Jewel are reminiscent of three colossal quartz crystals, visible for miles from the Nerang River to the Gold Coast hinterland. The crystalline forms of the towers are inspired by the gemstone shards discovered in the region which dates back thousands of years.

“Combining the cosmopolitan vibrancy and relaxed lifestyle for which the Gold Coast is renowned will certainly position The Langham as the quintessential luxury urban resort,” explained Stefan Leser, Chief Executive Officer of Langham Hospitality Group. “We are very much looking forward to complementing our legendary service standards with the warmth of this beautiful city to make our all guests’ experiences celebratory and memorable.”

Main image credit: Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts

Weekly briefing: sustainability standards, awards countdown & biophilic design 2.0

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Weekly briefing: sustainability standards, awards countdown & biophilic design 2.0

Only got a minute? As we prepare to host The Brit List Awards 2020 next week, we have have compiled our top stories that have been published over the last five days, including a haunted check-in, a hotel that sets new standards in sustainability and how we begin to engage with the post-corona consumer…

We are days away from unveiling the winners of the The Brit List Awards 2020. On November 12, starting at 14:00 (GMT), the industry will pause momentarily to tune in to attend our virtual awards ceremony. It will be an afternoon of celebration as we not only reflect on what has no-doubt been a challenging year for designers, architects, hoteliers and suppliers but also champion those who are driving change. As well as crowning this year’s individual winners, the awards ceremony will also include the official unveiling of The Brit List 2020, which will profile the top 25 designers, top 25 architects and top 25 hoteliers who are operating in Britain.

Want to attend The Brit List Awards 2020 free of charge? Designers, architect, hoteliers and developers: click here to secure your places in the audience. Suppliers: click here to secure you places in the audience.

Before the awards, though, here are this week’s top stories, brought to you by editor Hamish Kilburn

 Biophilic design 2.0 – from living walls to living hotels

Large hotel atrium with living walls

Image credit: Pixabay

For article three in the Hotel Designs LAB seriesHotel Designs and Arigami explore wellbeing through the lens of biophilic design. Founder of Arigami Ari Peralta compiles the thoughts of biophilic design expert Oliver Heath and environmental psychology researcher Nigel Oseland to explore the science of nature in design.

Biophilic design is much more than adding plants to a space, it is a strategy for developing a multi-sensory relationship with the world around us…

Read more. 

(In video) Hotel Designs LIVE: Reassuring the post-corona consumer

In the third session of Hotel Designs LIVE, we were joined by hoteliers from around the world in St Lucia, France, Zimbabwe and the UK to ask how we will reassure tomorrow’s travellers in a post-pandemic world.

On the panel: 

Watch the panel discussion.

Checking in to The Bull Inn, Totnes – a new standard in eco hospitality

Wooden furniture inside the pub of The Bull Inn in Totnes

It is time we erase the myth that sustainable hotels are a compromise on luxury. No longer should it be culturally acceptable to greenwash your way into the headlines by simply replacing miniatures and enforcing a ban disposable plastic – this should now be common practice. Instead, hotels and hospitality businesses should be conjuring up new, innovative ways to make a difference, not only environmentally, but also locally within the community.

Cue the arrival of The Bull Inn, an eight-key British bolthole located in Totnes. This deliberately rough round-the-edges pub/hotel is the fourth brainchild of visionary Geetie Singh-Watson, who worked with local architect Jackie Gillespie to ensure that, from concept through to completion, that every nook and cranny – from the pastel-coloured, untouched rooms right down to the innovative heating system – is sustainable.

Read the full review. 

In the HIX Seat: the journey back to ‘in real life’

An image of Joel Butler and HIX Event animations

Joel Butler, Co-Founder of HIX Event, has become a monthly columnist for Hotel Designs. In his first published opinion piece, Butler contemplates challenging times and asks ‘what’s next’ for the industry and its much-loved series of trade events.

Read Joel’s debut column here. 

One&Only Mandarina arrives in Mexico’s Riviera Nayarit

Overlooking the Pacific Ocean with dramatic vistas and an awe-inspiring beachfront rainforest setting, One&Only Mandarina is a hidden retreat complete with secluded eco-designed treehouses and clifftop villas, swimmable shores, destination dining from Chef Enrique Olvera, active and mindful experiences, and an environment crafted for reconnection.

Read more.

5 Minutes With: Karen Richards, co-founder and designer, The Idle Rocks

Image of Karen Richards and various interior shots inside The Idle Rocks Hotels

During a laid-back luxury experience at The Idle Rocks, we caught up with co-founder and designer Karen Richards to understand the hotel’s design narrative, and how it has adapted since lockdown.

Read the interview here.

In Conversation With: Dale Atkinson, Founding Director, Rosendale Design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: Dale Atkinson, Founding Director, Rosendale Design

Editor Hamish Kilburn catches up with Dale Atkinson, Founding Director of Rosendale Design, to understand more about his latest project inside The Stafford London as well as how F&B design on the luxury scene is changing…

It is arguably more important now than ever before to support those who are leading our industry forward with purpose; the solution-driven individuals who with each project they complete are challenging conventional design while meeting new demands of modern travellers – often ahead of time.

It may be too early to predict the long-term impact the pandemic will have on hospitality, but it is clear that main cities will be quieter territories in the near future. Therefore, hotels have to work harder to meaningfully attract tomorrow’s travellers and guests.

In this new and unwritten era, the power of F&B will play a major role. And to understand more, I met with Dale Atkinson, former Foster + Partners designer who is now Founding Director of Rosendale Design. Shortly after he had completed his latest project – The Park Suite and guestrooms inside The Stafford London – I wanted to know more about how his studio is gearing itself up for a post-pandemic world.

Hamish Kilburn: Can you tell us about your latest project?

Dale Atkinson: We were originally tasked with the redesign for the Game Bird, the Stafford’s main F&B offering and due to its success we were then asked to look at the redesign of their destination bar, the American Bar. We were able to redesign and optimise the main bar to ensure that the bartenders were able to send out more orders at once increasing turnover. The redesign was more of an evolution than revolution due to the devout following it already boasted.

“As the Stafford is seen as a quintessential British hotel, we wanted to celebrate that by employing, predominantly, British brands.” – Dale Atkinson, Founding Director, Rosendale Design.

Following the American Bar’s success, we were then asked to look at designing the rooms of the main house. As the hotel boasts and a very high occupancy rate, it was decided to redesign the rooms floor by floor, so not to lose revenue. Our latest rooms that we have handed over include the Park Suite, a maisonette suite with the bedroom and bathroom on the lower floor, and the sitting room and feature terrace, with stunning views over the London skyline towards the London Eye, on the upper floor. As the Stafford is seen as a quintessential British hotel, we wanted to celebrate that by employing, predominantly, British brands (ie. Morris and Co, Perrin and Rowe, Brintons as well as British artisan craftsmen.

Image caption: The Park Suite inside The Stafford London | Image credit: The Stafford London

Image caption: The Park Suite inside The Stafford London | Image credit: The Stafford London

HK: Have you pivoted the Rosendale Design business model since the Covid-19 crisis hit?

DA: There is no doubt that the hospitality sector has been one of the hardest hit. Luckily, as a studio, we have always been quite malleable to hardships and obstacles. As designers it is up to us to be creative not only in our designs for our clients but also in business and how we deal with these hardships. We have always taken on residential work as well, albeit this has been less of a focus, but due to people spending more time at home due to the lockdowns and also being asked to work from home, many are now seeing this as an opportune moment to change their space due to new ways in which they live and use their homes. We have also looked to start a new line of furniture and lighting products that we feel exude the design principals that we have become known for, timeless, contemporary, and refined.

HK: F&B is your core pillar. Are you noticing that your luxury clients are requesting any specific design features, such as booth seating and utilising outdoor spaces?

DA: We are still seeing a lot of interest in spaces despite everything that is happening, so we know there are lots of projects waiting to happen because we often are asked to accompany clients when seeing potential sites to get our views.

Image credit: Norma Restaurant, designed by Rosendale Design

Image credit: Norma Restaurant, designed by Rosendale Design

One aspect that is now more prevalent than ever before is outdoor/terrace spaces. In light of the recent pandemic, people want to be reassured they are in safe spaces, and outdoor seating areas can provide this confidence. Once terraces and outdoors spaces were a nice to have, now they have become a must have, which is also quite hard to come across in a condensed city such as London.

We believe that booth seating is here to stay, where tables can feel more segregated but still feel a part of a buzzing atmosphere. It is the designer’s job to use creative ways to create divisions, whilst not killing the atmosphere of any F&B outlet, whether it be a stand-alone restaurant or within a hotel.

Another new expectation is that people will, for some time at least, feel uneasy sitting so close to another table. So, restaurants, bars, and hotels will need more space which will be very difficult for many smaller London restaurant where the whole business model was based on getting in as many tables as possible.

HK: Are there any interesting or quirky ways that you can make spaces fit into a world with Covid-19?

DA: There will be many ways to take designs forward in this ’new normal’ we are experiencing, and copper is an excellent example of antimicrobial materials that are proven to kill bacteria within a couple hours. We are also seeing that brass also has similar properties so these will, most likely, be materials that pop up even more at various touch points. New microbial sprays are being used that will last a few months, and there will be a lot of fabrics that will be produced with antimicrobial properties.

We have seen fabrics impregnated with pure silver to help stop bacteria multiplying and creating odours and I believe there will be more fabrics produced with copper or similar ores imbedded into the threads to help kill bacteria and stop the spread of viruses.

Image caption: The American Bar inside The Stafford London. | Image credit: Rosendale Design

Image caption: The American Bar inside The Stafford London. | Image credit: Rosendale Design

HK: How will the typical dining experience change for a luxury consumer?

DA: For the luxury end of the dining experience, the issue of more space around the tables is already common place due to things such as trolley services and the like, but there will certainly be more of a shift towards not only paperless, but touches experiences. The technology has been around for years, so is nothing new, but there will be far more sensor-controlled toilettes and sinks.

One aspect I think that we must never lose is the element of human interaction. There is no replacement for having the waiter explaining the menu and the ingredients used within the dishes, or the intricacies of the wine list. It is in our nature to crave interaction; it just needs to be in a safe environment.

Has Covid-19 created barriers as you work with teams and suppliers around the globe?

At the start of the lockdown, it was an extreme paradigm shift not only in the way work but the way we live. There were, what we perceived, many barriers to begin with but we learned to circumnavigate them and if anything, I believe we have learned to streamline the way we work. For example, travel to and from meetings is now seen as unproductive time that is lost, when you can now just have a Zoom chat. Of course there are certain meetings that one must be on site to see everyone and things such as snags or how the colour temperature or luminous output of certain light fittings might affect a certain space, or how certain finishes within a room affect how it is perceived, but on the whole it has forced us to re-evaluate our perception of the value of time, increasing productivity which only benefits the client team.

HK: How do you envision for the future of hospitality and hospitality design? 

DA: It will take time to settle again and we will all be living by a new set of values, but I do believe the industry, as a whole, will persevere and come out on top. It will have to. As one of the largest sectors of employment not only in the UK, but the world. Hospitality will respond and I believe the major changes will be in how much space we see as safe.

Hotels and restaurants will need to provide patrons with more of it but this is easier said than done especially for those who are already operating in tight spaces. A big shift that we have already seen occur here in the UK is that people are now preferring to go to the countryside for short escapes as opposed to staying in the cities. Even after the theatres and the like reopen, I think there will be more of a celebration of the great outdoors, which will in itself, present new exciting opportunities.

HK: How do you differentiate Rosendale Design from other design studio’s – what are your core team’s USPs?

DA: We view each project as an individual, quite often we are designing for a client whether it be their home, or a restaurant for a chef, or for a brand for a hotel, and each project has its own concept. As a studio we never start by saying, ‘ok, so what is cool right now’. This way one ends up with a project that resembles many others of a time or epoch, and we strive, as a studio, to create timeless spaces so that they are as relevant 10 years later as the day they were built. We feel that to achieve this individuality we must tell the story of the client and their values/ personalities.

For residential projects we develop close reports with the client and try to get to know them as best we can. They will be living in the space afterwards so they must be fully onboard with our vision. Equally with restaurants, Chefs can spend more time in the kitchen than at home so the restaurant can in effect be their second home. We do often use the menus as a base to our design concept with gives it stronger roots. With hotels we look to bridge the ethos of the brand with the vernacular materials and cultures. Research forms the bedrock of any of our projects as it is what grounds it and gives it roots, otherwise it risks becoming a fashion.

Another USP is our extensive concept document that we produce, which includes layout options, furniture options, mood boards, and key to this document, are the 3D concept sketches (we boast a very accomplished artist) that gives clients an initial idea of how the space will look. In fact, most of our studio time goes into the first two stages of the design process, ensuring that the concept we are delivering is in line with the client’s expectations.

“We like to think of ourselves as a personable studio and so the people we are working with will, more often than not,  be our first source of inspiration.” – Dale Atkinson, Founding Director, Rosendale Design.

HK: Where do you look to for inspiration?

DA: We see every project individually so our inspiration will come from different sources every time. One of our main strengths is the research we undertake to understand the culture of the area or people. We like to think of ourselves as a personable studio and so the people we are working with will, more often than not,  be our first source of inspiration, ensuring our project with be as individual as the client/brand behind the project.

HK: What are you working on at the moment and what projects are in the pipeline?

DA: We have a couple residential projects in the UK that we are working on and we are also in the middle of a project with the Santa Marina Resort in Mykonos, which is due to open in May 2021. This will be a very exciting project and cannot wait to see how it will be received. We are also working on a very exciting restaurant concept, in Mayfair, which, has also been put back to the end of spring 2021.

Main image credit: Rosendale Design

Product watch: Parkside Tiles adds lavish colour to Arabescato

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Product watch: Parkside Tiles adds lavish colour to Arabescato

A bold and lavish take on Arabescato marble, Pulp is the latest porcelain wall and floor tile collection from design-led tile specification brand, Parkside…

Pulp from Parkside Architectural Tilers takes the rich veining of this exquisite marble and adds a contemporary flavour in five bold colours – gold, black, green, blue and red  – for a look that becomes strong, dynamic and surreal.

Available in matt, polished and raw (high slip-resistance) finishes, Pulp brings a marble look with a contemporary twist through floors and walls, inside or out. The rectified porcelain tiles are available in 600 x 1200mm, 100 x 600mm, 75 x 600mm (polished only), 300 x 300mm and 75 x 1200mm skirting, meaning the collection is ready to provide an all-over marble look that adds to its luxurious feel.

“Marble is definitely a timeless and demanding look that’s adored for its sense of unadulterated luxury,” explains Sarah Holey, marketing manager at Parkside. “There are few other interior finishes that quite so eloquently summarise their intent, but its high cost and natural variance make it a difficult one to introduce successfully into a project, particularly on large surface areas, so step up Pulp.

“The controlled colour and look of the marble veining brings a contemporary overtone that pays homage to genuine Arabescato marble but without falling into the trap of feeling like a direct copy. Pulp brings the instant luxury aesthetic of marble but in an accessible tile that celebrates the joy of colour and features the performance of today’s best porcelain.”

Pulp is exclusively available in all five colours from Parkside, with samples available from the website.

Parkside Architectural Tiles is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email  Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Parkside Architectural Tiles

In Conversation With: interior designer Lisa Haude

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: interior designer Lisa Haude

Interior designer Lisa Haude, founder of PDG Studios, is known for her creative and unique approach to design. Editor Hamish Kilburn sits down with the storyteller to understand why she is considered one of the industry’s finest…

A storyteller in her own right, designer Lisa Haude creates one-of-a-kind spaces that breathe a new level of authenticity into the projects she touches. Working predominantly with the larger brands, such Hilton Hotels & Resorts, Hyatt Hotels & Resorts and Marriott International, Haude’s style is to celebrate the history of each hotel’s destination, which is channeled through an meaningful design narrative that is sheltered inside each project. 

One of her recent projects – among many others – is AC Hotel by Marriott Washington D.C. Downtown, a hotel in the heart of the city that’s design marries together the architectural relevance of Washington D.C. with a modern twist.

Image credit: AC Hotel by Marriott Washington DC Downtown

“The one-of-a-kind light fixture that spans from the bar through the lobby space is actually a replica of the Potomac River from an aerial viewpoint.” – Lisa Haude, founder of PDG Studios.

To learn more about the project, and the designer who brought it to life, I caught up with Haude, the founder of PDG Studios.

Hamish Kilburn: What inspired you to be a designer? 

Lisa Haude: I’ve always loved being creative. Thinking outside of the box and bringing a vision to life is such a rewarding experience and one that I treasure the most.

HK: One of your recently completed projects was the AC Marriott DC. Can you explain for us the design scheme and what the challenges were for this project? 

LH: With this project, we wanted to take the iconic, historical architectural elements of Washington DC and reinvent them with a modern interpretation. This was done by juxtaposing strong structural lines (which the building already had) and incorporating softer curves and fluid movement via furniture and unique, yet focal, point details. For example, the one-of-a-kind light fixture that spans from the bar through the lobby space is actually a replica of the Potomac River from an aerial viewpoint, which was reinterpreted in an artistic light form to provide soft, fluid lines and movement throughout the space.  

Our biggest challenge with this space was working within a very small building that had many structural constraints. Although difficult at times, these challenges are what really allow us to expand our creativity and bring something truly unique to life! 

HK: As well as high-end luxury you have also completed some recent budget hotels. How do you achieve adding personality on a budget? 

LH: With a small budget, we focus on being strategic with how the funds are allocated, paying attention to every little detail and having a very strong design story that can be implemented from start to finish. This requires some flexibility and creativity as you work through the execution of the design with the contractor to ensure that the design intent is carried through and will make the most  out of the budget you are working with. 

Image credit: Hilton Garden Inn Bozeman

HK: Can you explain to us more about the projects you have on the boards? 

LH: We are currently working on a historic/adaptive reuse property, a modern mountain get-away, and another very fun project that will be a nod to history but with a modern twist, among a few others! 

HK: In your work, there seems to be a lot of emphasis on art. What is your secret to persuade the client to allocate enough budget for artwork? 

LH: We believe that art is part of the design story and we are very intentional with the placement and selection of the pieces we use. We work closely with our owners to make sure we have some money carved out to include some unique pieces in the spaces, as they are the necessary cherry on top that helps complete the design. 

Image of an art exhibition

Image credit: Hilton Garden Inn Sunnyvale

QUICK-FIRE ROUND

HK: What is one trend that you wish will never return?

LH: Wallpaper borders! This may be dating me slightly, but when I started in the design industry, a guestroom or residential project was not complete unless you had a wallpaper border in the space.

HK: What items during lockdown could you not have lived without? 

LH: Computer, iPhone and wine (and, of course, my daughter and dog!)

HK: What makes a good design team? 

LH: A team of like-minded individuals who respect each other and truly value each other’s input and love to collaborate.

HK: Who is your interior design hero? 

      LH: I have so many people in the industry that I look up to, but today, the people I admire the most are those working around the clock to find safe alternatives and vaccines so that we may all soon be able to travel freely and be inspired by the people and places around us.

HK: Describe PDG Studios in three words…

    LH: storytellers, authentic and collaborative! 

“It’s important to plan for and design zones that allow for individual space.” – Lisa Haude, founder of PDG Studios

HK: How have the challenges of the pandemic allowed you to challenge conventional design? 

LH: We now need to be more adaptive and creative with how we approach design. In our current designs, we encourage the incorporation of more green and outdoor space (i.e. rooftop  terraces, balconies and courtyards), the use of larger windows/natural light sources and less toxic materials, such as natural materials and plants. It’s important to plan for and design zones that allow for individual space, where one can work and be conscience of the materials that are being used. Moving forward, it will be imperative to source materials that do not harbour germs and can be easily cleaned—and those people spending time in these spaces will want to know that! 

Image credit: AC Hotel by Marriott Washington DC Downtown

HK: How will smart tech evolve in the hotel guestroom post-pandemic? 

LH: Easy/quick access to tech will become even more of a necessity. From the ability to work from your room via teleconferencing to the ease of being able to fully automate your room via your smart device, tech is most likely going to continue to evolve and become more mainstream and expected.  For example, the ability to turn on/off lights, control the AC /heat, open/close the door, etc., without contact (using voice activation instead) will be very desired and important to many people. The technology is already there for many of these items, but I believe there will be a greater push to make it more affordable and mainstream to the greater public in a hospitality-type setting.

HK: Has sustainability slipped off the agenda in hospitality? 

LH: I don’t think so. I feel like it is now even more important that we use products that are sustainable, locally sourced and easy to clean and maintain. I believe that this period of time has taught us all to take a step back and appreciate the people in our life and our surroundings. We have also become more conscience about our choices and how products are used and/or disposed of. 

Main image credit: PDG Studio/Hilton Garden Inn Bozeman/AC Hotel by Marriott Washington DC Downtown

Hotel Designs LIVE: speakers & sessions announced

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Hotel Designs LIVE: speakers & sessions announced

Designers, architects, hoteliers and developers can attend Hotel Designs LIVE for free on October 13, 2020…

Following the success of our first ever virtual conference, Hotel Designs LIVE is back on October 13, complete with new sessions and speakers.

Hotel Designs LIVE was born out of the idea to keep the industry connected and the conversation flowing during the lockdown period following the spread of Covid-19 coronavirus. However, considering the noise the virtual conference created, the team at Hotel Designs have decided to return with part two. “The aim of this event on October 13 is to look beyond today’s pandemic in order to find real solutions for designers, hoteliers, architects and developers,” explains editor Hamish Kilburn who will host the virtual event. “To do this meaningfully, we have invited industry experts from around the world to sit on our virtual sofa.”

If you are designers, architect, hotelier or developer, click here to secure your complimentary seat in the audience.

On the agenda

 

In addition to the live interviews and panel discussions with handpicked industry experts – and to ensure that the event is aptly bridging the gap between hospitality suppliers and designers, architects, hoteliers and developers – the conference also included structured ‘PRODUCT WATCH’ pitches around each session, allowing suppliers the opportunity to pitch their products and services in a ‘live’ environment to the hospitality buyers that are tuned in.

If you are a designer, architect, hotelier  or developer and would like to secure your complimentary seats in the audience, click here.

If you are a supplier to the hotel design industry and would like to promote your latest product or services to the Hotel Designs LIVE audience, please contact Katy Phillips via email or call +44 (0)1992 374050.

CASE STUDY: utilising sustainability and emotional practice in hotel design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: utilising sustainability and emotional practice in hotel design

Conscious, emotion and sustainability formed the design recipe for Kalukanda House, as interior designer Dee Gibson from Velvet Orange explains…

As an interior designer, I have always extolled the virtues of how a successful design makes my clients feel – and the aesthetics form only a part of that.

A space should functionally work, but it must also awaken as many senses as possible and I believe that comes from the designer at design stage connecting at a human level. Right from the get-go, we should be thinking about all the elements that will be pulled together to create an awakening for a user within a space that will stay with them long after we have gone.

“I deliberately allowed the design thinking to evolve as I discovered materials and fixtures that would fit the bill.” – Dee Gibson

Building a luxury hotel from scratch was an opportunity for me to put this into practice, and I deliberately allowed the design thinking to evolve as I discovered materials and fixtures that would fit the bill. Of course, the story doesn’t end there, we have a responsibility as hoteliers and designers to create and build sustainability, especially considering residential design trends can be influenced by the hotel market. Sharing this information and passion encourages others to join us; to engage emotionally and create spaces that people understand and want to talk about and replicate themselves.

Exterior of the property

Image caption: The colonial Walauwa architectural style of the building had to be restored sensitively in order to retain its charm and character

The hotel is on a gorgeous natural piece of jungle backed by a tall, golden cliff and 100 metres from the beach. Its garden was overgrown and the original derelict building had to be razed to the ground (not part of the plan). With a finite budget, it was important not to cut corners just to save money. At the same time, we had to balance the requirements of a demanding, luxury travel market. The challenge was to build and respect the elements of sea air, enormous trees, wildlife and extremes of weather and make the right financial choices around this.

The hotel is created in the colonial Walauwa architectural style associated with “Headmen” and the aristocracy, so the look was to be ultra luxury but had to be built responsibly. We wanted to evoke feelings of nostalgia for beautiful bygone eras, far away from the glass and steel structures that many developers favour today.

Image caption: Elements such as clay roof tiles and shutters were up-cycled to keep the style of the property

We stripped the bungalow of every inch that could be re-used. Original clay roof tiles were removed one by one and saved, shutters, doors, even the rotting fretwork was all dismantled. It was important to us to re-use as much as possible but also replicate original patterns wherever we had to make new. The charm of the original building had moved us and this was the closest I could get to completely replacing it and creating a sense of history.

The original grounds were bursting with tropical life; the trees and flora giving home and sanctuary to countless monkeys, birds and other wildlife. We carefully hand selected and cut back a small number of trees that were blocking light and designed outdoor spaces around the remainder. The gardens today are packed full of original, gigantic palms and Jackwood trees, and sunlight floods through to the ground where we have planted new exotic flowers, shrubs and Frangipanee.

Wooden shutters and doors on hotel

Image caption: The hotel has a distinct residential style that is both luxurious and thoughtful.

Working with the footprint of the original bungalow was crucial. Rather than cramming lots of small rooms in as was suggested (bums on seats), we created two levels and carved off half the space for a large double height, vaulted living area which would stay cool naturally, and the other half for four lovely bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms. We installed the refurbished doors, shutters and windows from the original property back into similar locations and had additional ones handmade by local craftsmen from local, sustainable sources.

We have a natural water well and that water is used to irrigate the gardens. If the well runs dry when it is particularly hot, then the gardens go without. The original jungle has been there for centuries without being watered and we chose beautiful but hardy plants that could withstand extreme weather patterns. It was one of hundreds of decisions we debated – how to balance finances, sustainable design and luxury market expectations.

Image caption: The bedrooms shelter a traditional look and feel with hidden technology keeping it relevant for the luxury market

Powerful hot showers are a personal must have for comfortable, luxury travel and the electricity for this comes from solar panels. The Grohe fittings are expensive in Sri Lanka but the thought of having cheaper, mass produced variants was not an option. In a hot country like Sri Lanka there are times when the heat can be intense, so we have installed fast, efficient high-tech AC units in the bedrooms in addition to ceiling fans, and we actively ask and encourage guests to use the fans where possible and be mindful of the impact on the environment.

Our future plans include switching over entirely to solar power, but frequent power cuts will mean we still have to rely on our generator.

The hotel is styled with antiques that are all in daily use, and individually selected based on how they stirred us emotionally. We used a local antique dealer who had stories to tell of his life including where he was on the day of the Tsunami in 2004. These human connections and stories of provenance added layers of interest and emotion into the process.

Other craftsmen hand carved furniture for us, and we consciously sought out Sri Lankan artisans instead of mass produced, replica retailers. The entire space breathes and pieces are installed for specific use, their inherent beauty and details are styling enough. Carvings and statues add a sense of nostalgia, these too are minimal so they can be admired.

Image caption: The interior design scheme inside the hotel evokes a strong sense-of-place and time

Having regular contact with the contractors meant that I could see the hotel going up brick by brick. Our Sri Lankan builders had knowledge of local building techniques as well as modern materials, they used labourers from local streets to help on smaller tasks and we retained the caretaker who had looked after the site before we bought it. Relationships were built and strengthened, our presence in the village has roots.

Every detail was considered, from drainage and irrigation to power sources and building materials, and contractors, craftsmen and staff. It took time and effort and since opening, there are costs associated with maintenance, but the hotel has been built responsibly and with authenticity.

Sustainability is an on going project for us. We share our story with guests and engage them as much as possible to join in by making conscious choices on meal ingredients, water and electricity consumption and even local experiences. Our toiletries are all organic and every bathroom has china bottles that are topped up with products. Single use plastic is down to less than five per cent and we are always thinking about what we can do to improve.

We are asking that all guests go on at least one of our experiences where we encourage a human connection with locals. We also have strong links with a local children’s charity who we support through donations from guest bookings and other means.

Our staff are trained to be discrete while attentive and they are encouraged to warmly interact with guests if it feels appropriate, recreating those moments of connection we had with various people when building Kalukanda House.

All of this brings the guest experience into a deep sense of connection with the provenance and values of the hotel, the people, and the environment. Guests want to actively participate in our sustainability and green initiatives and ask about this when booking to stay.

Designers and hoteliers must insist on thinking about a design approach that is both conscious, emotional and sustainable. Whether in Sri Lanka or anywhere else, we can use our influence to create engagement between users and their environment, as this is the beginning of a journey to good mental health, wellbeing and thinking about our world in a kinder and respectful way.

Over complicated technology, throw away fixtures and faddish design aesthetics result in buzzes that are easily forgotten, and an un-conscious lack of respect for the environment.

The Kalukanda House definition of luxury is having the time and means to engage at a human level, to savour every pleasure our senses can find and to leave a positive social impact on the space we leave behind. That word ‘conscious’ is the golden key to sustainable and timeless design.

Main image credit: The Kalukanda House

In Conversation With: Jacu Strauss, designer & founder of Lore Studio

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: Jacu Strauss, designer & founder of Lore Studio

An architect or a designer can become one of the most dynamic hoteliers, as editor Hamish Kilburn learns when sitting down with Jacu Strauss, the founder of Lore Studio and the mastermind behind some of the world’s most awe-inspiring hotels…

“Being a great storyteller is essential,” says designer Jacu Strauss as we start discussing what it takes to be a leader in design on the international hotel design scene.

It’s the first time we have caught up properly in a whirlwind three years. We catch up immediately where we left it in 2016, when the designer was putting the finishing touches onto The Pulitzer Amsterdam – an independent hotel project that allowed Strauss to break free with his creativity. “It was a once in a lifetime opportunity,” he says, “that through a cocktail of heavy research, team work and some brave risks turned out to be a tremendous success.”

Growing up in the diamond rich area of South Africa, Strauss moved to New Zealand to train as an architect at the University of Auckland before travelling to London to study at the Bartlett School of Architecture.

After graduating in 2008, Strauss worked as a senior designer at Tom Dixon’s Design Research Studio, and started to add major hospitality projects to his growing portfolio. “My architectural training and education proved helpful and I was responsible for the project from concept development through to completion,” explains Strauss. “As we won larger projects, we were eventually given the green light to design Mondrian at Sea Containers on London’s South Bank. It was there where I completed my first hotel and, eventually, I was offered an exclusive role as Creative Director of what is now called Lore Group.

“Designing a successful hotel is so much more than just choosing colours and fabrics.” – Jacu Strauss

Following the completion of The Pulitzer Amsterdam in 2016, which continues to capture the attention of the world’s media on a mass scale with its timeless yet quirky interiors, Strauss went on to not only design hotels, but also own them by becoming the founder of Lore Studio. “I have not so much changed as become more attune to what does and doesn’t,” he adds. “I have tried to refine how guests and visitors experience our hotels, so it is more than just the visual. It involves a balance of senses that when you get it right means an enjoyable and memorable experience.”

Image of the designer flicking through a book on the floor

Image credit: Emily Andrews

Today, in between jetting around the world being inspired by life’s movement, Strauss and his team are working to complete a new independent hotel, RIGGS Washington DC, a hotel, slated to open in heart of the city at the end of this year, sheltered in what was the Riggs National Bank building. “Washington DC is a city with a particularly strong and quirky evolving hotel and F&B market,” he explains. “So much so, in fact, that there may be another hotel in DC to join the portfolio, but it will be completely different to RIGGS Washington DC.

QUICK-FIRE ROUND:

Hamish Kilburn: What would you like to be if you were not a designer/architect/hotelier?
Jacu Straus: A jeweller

HK: What’s the first rule to learn when designing a hotel?
JS: You can only open the hotel once, so make everything count!

HK: Where is the next hotel design hotspot?
JS: There is a great need for more hotels in urban centres that act as calm retreats for peace from the hustle and bustle of dense cities, but without being gimmicky.

HK: What one hotel would you have liked to have designed/or would like to redesign?
JS: I would have loved to be part of the design team of the Negresco Hotel in Nice. It’s so crazy and magical – I love it.

HK: What is the number one item you cannot travel without?
JS: Tabasco! I always have little sachets of Tabasco in my travel wallet. The little bottles are cute but the sachets are more convenient for travel. Tabasco makes everything taste better.

HK: What trend do you wish would emerge again soon?
JS: Decent table manners.

HK: What was the last hotel you stayed in?
JS: Downtown hotel in Mexico City.

HK: Explain London in three words…
JS: Quiet, polite, multicultural.

HK: What’s your favourite colour this season?
JS: Rust. Something nice about earthier and natural  tones as we move away from sterile palettes.

HK: What’s the last thing that shows up on your credit card statement?
JS: Uber. It is the first item that appears and most of what is inbetween!

As someone as visual as Strauss, the urge the design came as almost a natural instinct. “I think I was always a designer,” he narrates. “My mother says I was always observing my surroundings as a child and I think to this day it’s perhaps one of the reasons that I am doing what I am doing. What I really think makes you a professional designer is being able to process criticism. That you learn over time and does not come naturally.”

“F&B, I believe, is once again thriving in hotels.” – Jacu Strauss

As we converse over cocktails in a rooftop bar overlooking east London, it feels apt to discuss the rise of food and beverage facilities within hotel design. “I think hotels have historically been an important “pillar” in a city or town or community,” he explains. “But towards the end of the last century hotels became massive and exclusive only to its guests, and that meant it became inaccessible to their neighbours. Hotels are unique to their locations and I think guests have become more interested in feeling like they are part of a community even just for a night, than staying at a non-descript hotel that is removed from its surroundings. F&B is a tell-tale sign of how it was once the place to eat and drink, before it then became sterile. F&B, I believe, is once again thriving in hotels – as we’re proving this afternoon – because hotels are opening up to locals as well as guests making it feel less like a “hotel restaurant” and more like a restaurant that happens to be in a hotel.”

In reference to the quick-fire round above, Strauss is a man that believes in detail. “I have realised how important it is to research a new market thoroughly and avoid having a cookie cutter approach,” Strauss explains. “Designing a successful hotel is so much more than just choosing colours and fabrics. It is about the neighbourhoods, the greater contexts of the city and its people, and ensuring the longevity of a product. There are always things to improve on, but we believe you only open a hotel once.”

For the designer who has just as much in the pipeline as what’s already on his impressive portfolio, what makes him stand out his ability to be different. “At some stage,” he adds, “you need to ignore what others are doing and focus on your own task at hand and making decisions based our own hotel and not what others are doing.”

Another distinct characteristic that quite clearly sets Strauss aside from other hoteliers, designers and architects is his ability to effortlessly – on the surface at least – to balance work and life. Living his best life through both travel and work and sometimes a combination of both, Strauss is anything but a one-trick pony, constantly absorbing ideas, concepts and themes that time and time again capture the world’s attention each time the ribbon is cut. And for those wanting a snippet of the inspiration behind his designs, you have only to follow him on Instagram account.

Main image credit: Patrick Meis

St Regis opens “curated mansion” in Hong Kong

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
St Regis opens “curated mansion” in Hong Kong

Renowned interior designer André Fu completes his latest project, St Regis Hong Kong, located in the vibrant district of Wan Chai…

An ode to the cultural diversity and timeless elegance of Hong Kong, The St. Regis Hong Kong has opened and is described as a curated mansion which has been realised through the masterful lens of designer, André Fu.

Design elements throughout the hotel seamlessly combine classic luxury with modern sophistication, incorporating signature details which pay homage to Hong Kong’s rich culture and heritage.

“Hong Kong has always been one of the most attractive destinations for global luxury travelers, and the St. Regis brand is synonymous with timeless luxury and impeccable standards of hospitality,” said Henry Lee, Chief Operations Officer and Managing Director, Greater China, Marriott International. “We are very glad to add The St. Regis Hong Kong to Marriott International’s strong luxury portfolio in the market. The St. Regis Hong Kong represents the very best of the St. Regis brand, with its distinctive design, exquisite fine dining and truly exceptional service.”

Designed for business travellers and culture seekers alike, the 27-storey property boasts 129 appointed guestrooms and suites featuring warm and inviting touches throughout. A residentially-inspired retreat in the heart of Wan Chai, guestrooms at The St. Regis Hong Kong feature wood flooring and accents infused with understated Asian sensibility, deep soaking bathtubs and expansive windows with sweeping views of the harbour and city. The hotel is also home to a heated swimming pool and poolside bar, as well as a health club with a spa treatment room and other luxury amenities.

Image credit: Marriott International/St St Regis

The St. Regis Hong Kong also introduces two exceptional dining concepts to the region with L’Envol and Rùn, each spearheaded by award-winning chefs. At L’Envol, guests can indulge in French Haute cuisine created by chef Olivier Elzer who has accrued a remarkable 18 Michelin stars throughout his career to date. The hotel’s signature Cantonese restaurant, Rùn, is led by renowned chef and winner of the Silver Award in the 2012 Best of the Best Culinary Awards, Hung Chi-Kwong. Famed for his contemporary interpretations of Cantonese cuisine, Chi-Kwong’s restaurant will serve innovative takes on traditional Cantonese fare.

The Drawing Room is an all-day eatery with views of the Terrace. Meanwhile, the St. Regis Bar is a contemporary bar for after-hours digestifs.

The St. Regis Hong Kong is also an all-encompassing events destination with approximately 12,000 sq. ft. of event space across five venues. The sophisticated Astor Ballroom, with its cathedral high ceiling design, is perfectly suited for grand-scale events; while the Rockefeller Room is a versatile space for corporate meetings or more intimate affairs.

The hotel’s opening follows Marriott’s plans to open more than 30 luxury properties this year.

Main image credit: Marriott International/St Regis

Meet Up London: 2 weeks to go!

800 418 Hamish Kilburn

In two weeks time, on March 28, Hotel Designs will host Meet Up London at Minotti London… 

There are just two weeks until the industry’s leaders will gather at Meet Up London. The event, which takes place on March 28 at Minotti London’s showroom will be attended by leading designers, architects, hoteliers and key-industry suppliers.

As well as providing the perfect networking stage for professionals who are working on the hotel design scene, the event will also pay special attention to young designers as it will unveil Hotel Designs’ 30 Under 30 (the shortlist can be accessed here).

The latest names to the guest list include designers, directors and 30 Under 30 shortlisted finalists from the likes of ARA Design, Denis Irvine Studio and Occa Design, as well as the general manager of The Beaumont London.

They will join designers and directors from leading studios such as Richmond InternationalHBA LondonGenslerJestico + WhilesGoddard LittlefairProject Orange and WATG who are among the names that are also confirmed to attend.

How to attend Meet Up London 

If you are an interior designer, architect, operator or hotelier and would like to attend Meet Up London, click here to book your place.

If you are a supplier to the hospitality industry looking to attend the event, contact Zoe Guerrier on 01992 374059 or on z.guerrier@forumevents.co.uk – or click here to book your place.

For more information about becoming a Hotel Designs Meet Up sponsor, contact Zoe Guerrier on 01992 374059 or email z.guerrier@forumevents.co.uk.

Exclusive style partner: Minotti London

Exclusive headline partner: Hamilton Litestat

Event partner: Tarkett

Gifting Partner: Aslotel

In Conversation With: Sebastian Herkner, designer of the year

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In Conversation With: Sebastian Herkner, designer of the year

At just 37 years old, designer Sebastian Herkner who is known for straddling the boundaries between modernity and tradition, becomes  designer of the year at Maison & Objet. In between Herkner’s press calls and panel discussions, editor Hamish Kilburn caught up with the man of the moment discuss the evolution of his pieces…

What makes Sebastian Herkner a name to remember in the congested industry of interior design is his ability to effortlessly fuse together tradition with creativity.

His approach to design first became commercialised in 2006, after completing his studies at the University of Art and Design at Offenback, when he set up his own studio. His first landmark design, the Bell Table, took no less than three years to find the right manufacturer because of Herkner’s design being ‘ahead of its time’, the double-edge sword of being a leader with creative vision. The table consists of a steel and brass platter that nestles on a hand-blown glass base that was produced in a centuries-old Bavarian glass factory.

The bell table by Sebastian Herkner

Image caption: The Bell Table

His appetite for a challenge and his desire to explore unchartered territories has not only led him to design glasses, bicycles and perfume bottles or make forays into the world of interior design, but also to embark on an internship with fashion designer Stella McCartney during the course of his studies. “I was interested in the manufacturing processes used in fashion, and understanding how colours are put together” he explains. The flair for combining colours he honed whilst there now underpins his signature style. “Colour is often the very last thing designers think about. For me, it’s always the starting point for the whole design process”. He does admit, nonetheless, that “it can take years to find that perfect colour combination”.

“I want my products to become companions, which I believe is very important these days in order to create timeless pieces.”

Fast-forward 15 years from when he opened his first studio, and more than 120 product launches later, Herkner is today centre stage at one of the world’s most reputable design fairs, Maison & Objet, being dubbed the ‘designer of the year’, a title that feels not only thoroughly deserved but also one that feels totally appropriate for the man who never looks back. “My designs are not driven by target groups, they are more driven by quality and functionality, while mixing new technologies and materials with craftsmanship and colours,” Herkner explains. “I want my products to become companions, which I believe is very important these days in order to create timeless pieces.” These ‘companions’ sit in harmony at the show, exhibiting the designer’s journey.

Clip Chair for De Vorm

Image caption: Sebastian Herkner’s Clip Chair for De Vorm

Be it in his studio, surrounded by a six -strong team that herald from all four corners of the world, or during his frequent trips to China, Colombia, Thailand, Senegal and Canada visiting local manufacturers , design houses and craftsmen, Herkner has a longstanding habit of quenching his thirst for ideas elsewhere. “Different cultures, skills and lifestyles all fuel my inspiration” he explains . He also finds his inspiration in traditional materials, such as ceramics, leather, marble and also in art. Another of his iconic pieces, the “Oda” floor lamp (Pulpo , 2014), bears testament to that . Resembling a reservoir of light, the design was directly inspired by photographic images of water towers captured by Bernd and Hilla Becher. Every single source of inspiration is perfectly in tune with his quest for authenticity, his desire to use sustainable materials , and his sense of respect for the time it takes to create a truly stunning piece.

Bulbous glass light on floor

Image credit: “Oda” floor lamp (Pulpo , 2014)

Quick-fire round

Hamish Kilburn: What colour are you finding interesting at the moment? 
Sebastian Herkner: Salmon pink (in Matt)

HK: What is the one item you cannot travel without:
SH: My phone. I am addicted! 

HK: Where is next on your travel bucket list? 
SH: I would love to go to Peru. Big cities, unfortunately, look all the same. 

HK: Is there a trend that you hate? 
SH: When people choose to infuse ‘soft Skandi’ in their interiors. I love the Scandinavian look and feel, but I feel as if people should use it with more courage and strength. 

HK: Would you change anything in the last ten years?
SH: No, nothing. 

For a designer who is known for being ahead of his time when it comes to his ability to combine functionality with technology, I am somewhat taken aback when Herkner suggests that the industry has to some extent gone too far. “Smart homes is one thing, but i believe that furniture will remain still because they are designed for human beings,” he explains. “We need somewhere to sit, and I do not believe there is any need for charging sockets in the sofa – in the table, perhaps, but not the sofa.

Herkner’s recent accolade gives him a platform to unveil some of his latest creations whilst simultaneously showcasing the manufacturing processes that have always been so close to his heart.

Main image credit: Sebastian Herkner/Gany Gerster 

In Conversation With: Moritz Waldemeyer, lighting designer to the stars

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Lighting designer Moritz Waldemeyer speaks to editor Hamish Kilburn about 2019 trends, the power of lighting therapy and how one moment in time can dramatically change the direction of a creative’s career…  

Anyone who has had the pleasure to spend more than five minutes in the company of the multi-talented Moritz Waldemeyer will agree with me when I say that he is a breath of creative, fresh air. Despite having designed LED pieces for major players in popular culture such as music icons Ellie Goulding, WillIAm, Take That and fashion design hero Philip Treacy OBE, Waldemeyer’s head has always remained cool when working on many creative platforms.

Following a career-defining moment of lighting a costume collection for the closing ceremonies of both the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games, Waldemeyer’s recent gaze in the hospitality industry saw him at the centre of many interesting conversations at London Design Festival last year. His personalised lighting installation entitled Journey of Colour at Focus18 raised eyebrows among designers from around the world on the potential of lighting within hotel design. “Timing is everything,” Waldemeyer says. “My knowledge of technology, which is an area that has always interested me, placed me in the design sphere with a unique skillset at the right time.”

WAVE chandelier in Intercontinental Davos, which is 1,400 hand-blown glass spheres swirl in a playful shape of a gust of snow,

Image caption: WAVE chandelier in Intercontinental Davos, which is 1,400 hand-blown glass spheres swirl in a playful shape of a gust of snow,

Waldemeyer’s journey in the world of fashion, design and lighting started with an early interest for technology. Following his studies on mechatronics at Kings College London, Waldemeyer began experimenting with his passion for lighting – and after graduating, he gained experience working for Phillips in the product development team. It was at this moment in time, while other employees were working the nine-to-five, when Waldemeyer started to experiment with lighting and its boundaries. His forward-thinking attitude soon sparked the attention of the fashion world, which led to what was arguably his first major career break.

Virtual Reality – Moritz Waldemeyer for Philip Treacy

Image caption: Virtual Reality – Moritz Waldemeyer for Philip Treacy

Paris Fashion Week 2007 witnessed Hussein Chayalan showcase dresses impregnated with servo-driven lasers that were engineered and programmed by Waldemeyer. With the aim to create a sensational atmosphere that captured the attention of the world’s media, Chayalan turned to Waldemeyer to emit laser beams from the dresses on the models who strutted spectacularly down the catwalk. “It’s a great, indescribable feeling to be part of fashion history,” Waldemeyer shares. “And it was after this show I realised just how revolutionary this was when figures in the music industry got in touch asking me how I could work with them to create visual experiences.”

“I am looking at animated lighting, which is super retro and exciting.”

Waldemeyer’s dip into the world of high-fashion, I believe, gives him a unique leverage when it comes to helping to transform lighting within hotel interior design spaces. But when it comes to looking ahead, it seems as if Waldemeyer is left wondering like the rest of us what defines a ‘trend’. “It’s really difficult to look at trends on a year-by-year basis, because I believe that the development isn’t that fast in lighting,” he comments. “However, from my point of view, we have yet to establish the limits of LED potential. I am looking at animated lighting, which is super retro and exciting.”

Flos presented this stunning collaborative project during the Milan Salone 2009 which involved no less than 5 well known contributors: design by Philippe Starck, text by Jenny Holzer, execution by Flos, crystal by Baccarat and custom electronic design by Moritz Waldemeyer.

Image caption: Flos presented this stunning collaborative project during the Milan Salone 2009 which involved no less than five well known contributors: design by Philippe Starck, text by Jenny Holzer, execution by Flos, crystal by Baccarat and custom electronic design by Moritz Waldemeyer.

Following on from our insight into how the public areas of hotels are changing, there has been many debates about how the lobby and the guestroom can continue to evolve into new eras. Technology within lighting has unlocked the door to welcome in the opportunity of more atmospheric areas within the hotel, which is arguably the key to create the personalised hotel of the future. “Considering that the lobby is the first area that guests walk in to, I believe there is room for designers to be more playful,” he explains. “When it comes to the guestroom, though, I believe we as lighting experts need to ensure that we are creating intuitive lighting that works with the user. It’s a challenge to ensure we are creating seamless lighting experiences that don’t hinder the overall guest experience. It’s sometimes easy to forget when working on large pieces to view the experience from a guests’ point of view, but this is so important when it comes to the design of the lighting.”

“We deliberately use a lot of colour, which is arguably therapeutic with the aim to bring people back to themselves.”

One area within the interior design of hotels that continues to divide opinions is understanding the fundamental purpose of lighting in the guestroom. While designers aim to firmly establish lighting’s functional properties as well as its decorative qualities within the guestroom, there are questions rippling through the industry on how wellbeing can be incorporated within hotel design, and Waldemeyer may have the answer. He explains: “We deliberately use a lot of colour, which is arguably therapeutic with the aim to bring people back to themselves. Art pieces that use light to encourage calmness ­– similar to watching a roaring open fire – somewhat sedates the tone of the room and the guests’ minds. Using colour in this way has the complete opposite reaction to what happens when we as consumers stare mindlessly at our phones or devices.”

Moritz Waldemeyer's personalised lighting installation, Journey of Colour, was exhibited at Focus 18.

Image caption: Moritz Waldemeyer’s personalised lighting installation, Journey of Colour, was exhibited at Focus 18.

Waldemeyer strikes me as someone who is constantly looking ahead to establish new ways to be creative with lighting. “I’m excited about craftsmanship, which is really big on our agenda at the moment,” says Waldemeyer. “Travelling the world has allowed me to establish new avenues and my task at the moment is to understand how we can present traditional craftsmanship in lighting to a modern audience, which is challenging but also so rewarding at the same time.”

Waldemeyer’s own ‘journey of colour’ is, I believe, still in the very early stages when establishing what is possible within the future of commercial lighting. I leave the creative with focused lenses, now being able to zoom in to understand further the emotional links between our minds and how our hotels are lit. One of the largest conclusions, though, is seeing how outside influences, from areas such as fashion and popular music, can absolutely shed some light on the direction our industry should be heading when it comes to forward-thinking an innovation.

Moritz Waldemeyer Studio is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, click here.

Main image credit: Moritz Waldemeyer Studio

Architecture meets fashion: Zaha Hadid Design’s latest collaboration weaves a new direction in sportswear technology

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Design giant Zaha Hadid Design unveils collaboration with a Swiss performance sportswear brand, suggesting that inspiration for designers and architects is not limited to one – or even two – industries. Hamish Kilburn investigates…

A designer recently told me that that it’s imperative to be at the edge of curve in design, to always think ahead of the present – sometimes as much as fives years ahead. But, in an industry that is forever forward-thinking, can we, as creatives, benefit from taking inspiration from other those far removed from the front line of design and architecture. One of the most well-known brands in the design sphere, Zaha Hadid Design, believes so. The firm has found common ground with a Swiss performance sportswear brand, Odlo, and through a thoroughly researched two-year collaboration, the two companies have recently unveiled Odlo Futureskin to the world, a new baselayer for winter performance sports that has been created with design and architecture at its core.

The idea that sportswear isn’t always sexy is what sparked the opportunity for Odlo to reach out to the design and architecture arena for some inspiration when creating the next chapter for next-to-skin sportswear. Inspired by its seamless design qualities, the company approached Zaha Hadid Design with the brief in December 2016. The true collaboration between both brands – in knowledge, research and resources – resulted in the birth of Odlo Futureskin, a baselayer that is arguably the most technically advanced on the market. The garmet is smart. So smart that it controls the flow of air and adapts to breathing and even movement. The ‘body mapping’ technology allows the garment to act like a second skin – and in full  Zaha Hadid Design spirit, it’s also seamless.

The engineered baselayer tops for men and women formed in the same manner as most of the Zaha Hadid Archtiects projects come together; with the combination of visual ideas, extensive research and the desire to push boundaries and challenge conventional design.

Two years after first putting pen to paper, following much planning – and even more prototypes – the companies gathered at the Zaha Hadid Gallery in London on a late October evening for the global launch of Odlo Futureskin.

Through this unique collaboration, which has no sign of ending as Zaha Hadid Design unveils that it will continue to work with Odlo for the sportswear brand’s SS19 female line, both companies have opened up new avenues for inspiration among designers, architects and sportswear brands, further proving that great ideas comes from thinking outside the box.

Meanwhile, Zaha Hadid Architects continues to show that it’s at the top of the architectural food chain, as it has recently completed the Morpheus in Macau and it presses ahead to complete Malta’s Murcury Tower, which will shelter a new boutique hotel.

If you have looked to other industries for inspiration when designing a product or project, our editorial team want to hear from you. Tweet us @HotelDesigns 

Brit List 2018 long list announced

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This year’s Brit List has officially announced the 2018 long list as it heads towards the final straight to finding Britain’s top interior designers, hoteliers and architects…

Hotel Designs has announced the long-listed interior designers, hoteliers and architects that are all in with a chance of making it into The Brit List 2018.

The long-listed finalists will be invited to BEAT London on November 22 when The Brit List 2018 will be unveiled to highlight the top 25 interior designers, top 25 hoteliers and the top 25 architects in Britain today.

The nationwide search began months ago when Hotel Designs opened up nominations to readers of the publication in order to enter whom they believed deserved to be recognised as British leaders and influencers in international hotel design.

There are limited spaces available to attend this year’s highly anticipated event. In order to purchase your tickets and to secure your place, click here.

Below are the long-listed candidates for this year’s Brit List.

Contantina Tsoutsikou HBA London
Andrew Linwood Areen Hospitality
Ariane Steinbeck RPW Design
Bee Osborn Osborn Interiors
Emma King InterContinental Group
Dexter Moren Associates Dexter Moren Associates
Tim Murray Helen Green Design
Alex Kravetz Alex Kravetz Design
Fiona Thompson Richmond International
Martin Brudnizki MBDS
Rachel Johnson Wimberly Interiors
Terry McGinnity GA Design London
Jo Littlefair Goddard Littlefair
Kelly Hoppen Kelly Hoppen Design Interiors Ltd
Maria Vafiadis MKV Design
Christopher Ash Project Orange
Katherine Neathercoat Scott Brownrigg
Tara Bernerd Tara Bernerd & Partners
Robert Angell Robert Angell Design International
Helen Fewster Suna Interior Design
Rebecca Hunt Suna Interior Design
Frances Blackham Trevillion Interiors
Harry Harris SUSD
Stephanie Dennett Brakspear
Nicholas Stoupas Twenty2Degrees
Joesph Stella Twenty2Degrees
Tom Bartlett Waldo Works
Harry Gregory Ara Design
Rock Galpin Rock Galpin Ltd
Kathleen Hockney Cole & Son
Nicholas Sunderland NSI Design Ltd
Kim Partridge Kim Partridge Interiors
Rami Fustok The Mandrake
Conor O’Leary Gleneagles, Scotland
Jenny Oh King Street Townhouse
Johnson Joseph LALIT, London
Brian Benson The Gainsborough
Mario Ovsenjak Hotel Gotham
Jasdeep Sodhi Hotel Indigo, 1 Leicester Square
Robin Sheppard Bespoke Hotels
Jennifer McCabe Charlotte Street Hotel
Fiona Moores The Pig at Combe
Faye Stone The Pig in the Wall
Sarah Holden The Pig near Bath
Peter Kienast The Principle, Manchester
Michael Achenbaum The Curtain, London
Gareth Banner The Ned, London
Thomas Kochs The Corinthia, London
Michael Bonsor The Rosewood, London
David Morgan-Hewitt The Goring, London
Kevin Brooke Cliveden House
Nick Hanson Idle Rocks Hotel, St Mawes
Will Ashworth Watergate Hotel
Marco Novella The Lanesborough
Nathan White Seaham Hall
Paul Walsh Hotel Football
Mark Sainsbury Zetter Hotels
Michael Helling The Grove, Hertfordshire
Barney Cunliffe The Gilpin
Sergio Leandro Mondrian London
Chris Weaver High Road House
Debrah Dhugga Dukes Hotel
James Twomey Reardon Smith
Gordon Ferrier 3D Reid Architecture
Richard Morton Richard Morton Architects
James Dilley Jestico + Whiles
Julian Dickens Jestico + Whiles
Liz Pickard Consarc Architects
Martin Pease WATG
David Richard Mellor David Richard Mellor
John Simpson John Simpson Architects
Maha Kutay Zaha Hadid Architects
Woody Yao Zaha Hadid Architects
Tommy Lee PLP Architecture
Phil Jaffa Scape Design Associates
Georgia Stevenson SHH Architects and Interior Designers
Tom Lindblom Gensler
Richard Hywel Evans Studio RHE
Caroline Smith Wish London
Yasmin Mahmoudieh Yasmine Mahmoudieh
Jonathan Manser The Manser Practice
Nathalie Rozencwajg Rare Architecture
Mark Bruce EPR Architects
Geoff Hull EPR Architects
David Archer Archer Humphreys Architects
Howard Jones Archer Humphreys Architects
Abinitio Architects & Planners Abinitio Architects & Planners

This year, as well as celebrating The Brit List 2018, the awards will launch six coveted awards. These include:

  • Inspiration in Design – Innovative use of Technology
  • Inspiration in Design – Boutique Hotelier
  • Inspiration in Design – Interior Designer of the Year
  • Inspiration in Design – Architect of the Year
  • The Eco Award
  • Outstanding Contribution to the Hotel Industry

Shortlist finalists: Inspiration in Design – Innovative use of Technology

  • Meystyle – Product: LED wallpaper and fabric
  • Moritz Waldemeyer – Product: LDF18 Lighting installation
  • Aquavision
  • Criton
  • ACT STUDIOS
  • Hotel Room Chooser

Shortlist finalists: The Eco Award

  • Tate Harmer – Project: Eden Hotel
  • Deadgood – Project: Hug Chair
  • Interface  – Product: All products
  •  Ecolight
  • Zetter Hotels

Event timings: 6.30 p.m. – 10.30 p.m.

6.30 p.m. Welcome drinks are served
7.00 p.m. Welcome speech from Hotel Designs Editor, Hamish Kilburn, to include unveiling of The Brit List 2018 winners
7.15 p.m. Canapés are served
7.15 p.m. Headline speaker addresses The Brit List 2018
7.30 p.m. Awards presentation commences
8.00 p.m. Headline speaker addresses The Brit List 2018
8.15 p.m. Celebrations and networking

In order to secure you place, click here to purchase tickets. 

To discuss the various sponsorship packages available, please contact Katy Phillips on +44(0)1992 374050

BRIT LIST 2018 Industry partner: British Institute of Interior Design

Talking furniture trends with Rock Galpin

Hamish Kilburn

From designing celeb hot spots in London to creating award-winning contract furniture collections, Rock Galpin is a fountain of knowledge when it comes to cutting-edge product design, interiors and understanding the trends as editor of Hotel Designs Hamish Kilburn learns after meeting the designer at London Design Festival…

It was at the beginning of London Design Festival (LDF), at an after-party in The Curtain to be precise, when and where I first had the pleasure of meeting the award-winning furniture designer Rock Galpin. Having just flown in that evening following a trip to the sun-trapped island of Rhodes, Galpin was in London to assess the trends while also using the week as a fine opportunity to catch up with old and new clients and friends, two categories are separated only by what I can describe as a faint line in the sand. Among them was Galpin with a friendly and approachable demeanour that draws me in to want to understand the man behind the designer.

One week later, as the dust starts to settle on the Capital, Galpin and I are meeting for coffee to discuss trends, industry success and innovation in design. “So this is what I’m working on at the moment and what I wanted to show you,” he says as he opens the laptop to reveal his ‘top secret’ design renders and plans, which, without giving too much away, inspire me to realise that the future of contract furniture is turning a page to an exciting chapter. “As a designer that is working in the commercial sector, I’m often looking up to 10 years ahead of the now,” he explains. Galpin’s logic is that you have to allow two-to-four years before your design, once commissioned, will even enter the production phase. “In addition, you want to design a product that has a minimum shelf life of at least five years,” he explains. For Galpin, who to my eyes has the patience of a saint being able to sit on designs for that long, the contract furniture product of the future will operate in a tech-driven scene, allowing for a seamless experience. He explains: “I want to ideally create an environment whereby technology is completely invisible.” His vision comes as, somehow, despite the growing demand in tech-driven experiences, certain technologies have not evolved and personalisation continues to be a really interesting topic. “Maybe the chair will physically mold to fit the user, or maybe the table will organically allow the user to be sat in the best state physically as mentally,” he adds. “I have a few ideas on how we can do this.”

Image caption: Render of Matrix 6 collection by Rock Galpin

Working so far ahead is a challenge for any creative, and getting the balance right between being creative and being commercially appealing is key, as Galpin explains: “I have come to realise that people will accept incremental changes in design and not large leaps. Of course, there are exceptions to that, just take the Google’s offices as an example. However, I do believe that clients and consumers prefer to see a more gradual progression in product design as we move forward.”

“I have noticed that colour seems to come in when we are experiencing a repressed or depressing economic time.”

With this year’s Brit List around the corner, and LDF continuing to prove that it is at the centre of the design world, Galpin is quite obviously proud to be a British designer. “Britain always seems to have this breath and eclectic, inventive population that, I suppose, being an island as well, can incubate ideas. Other countries can’t do that as well,” says Galpin as we start discussing London as a major international design hub. “We’re going softer and softer as an aesthetic when it comes to shapes and forms. Interestingly, though, colours have become really powerful this season,” he says. “We’re seeing a lot of vibrant colours and citrus accents; blues and pinks are very much around. I have noticed that bold colours seem to creep in and actually the integrity of design evolves when we are experiencing a repressed or depressing economic period because designers need to work harder in order to tick certain boxes. I have noticed that in the most demanding times come some of the best designs. The ’80s were a great example of this. But immediately after, of course, we experience the complete opposite. They called it ‘green’ design which was a way of becoming more sustainable, raw and eco-friendly.”

Galpin’s ability to work the room at any event was evident at LDF and is the direct result of years of hard work in order to establish himself in the industry as a rightful leader. His first major break, though, came when he was asked to design a furniture line for ARAM, which, along with Terence Conran, was one of the most significant – and most important – furniture brands at the time. “It was a really nice journey, and allowed me to work closely with Zeev Aram,” he says smiling. “I did a sofa and table collection for them right at the beginning of my career. It took two and half years, and it was a truly lovely process.” The modular sofa system and range of tables made fame in 1993. Aimed at the design savvy contract market, the Kama sofas and Sutra Tables also appealed to the clean-living domestic market.

“As a result of the collaboration, in 2005, Galpin won the Laurent-Perrier Design Award.”

Image caption: Sketch sofa by Designers Guild, designed by Rock Galpin

Other milestones in Galpin’s full career include designing The Bombay Sapphire Experience and London’s Punk Nightclub, which became a favourite for the likes of Kate Moss and her entourage. However, one of the most impressive moments, from where I am sitting at least, is Galpin’s collaboration with Designers Guild. Applying for a competition in order to collaborate with the brand, he pitched his designs along with 30 other designers and won. The project enabled him to work with Tricia Guild OBE and the manufacturers B-Design in southern Italy, which produces furniture for the likes of Minotti, Cappellini and Thonet. As a result of the collaboration, in 2005, Galpin won the Laurent-Perrier Design Award for the Sketch Sofa and Easy Lounger. “The whole journey was fantastic from drawing and designing right through to production,” Galpin adds. One year later, Galpin continued to be at the forefront of the international design scene by unveiling the Mark 1, which was awarded runner up for the same award.

Quick-fire round:

Hamish Kilburn: Where’s next on your travel bucket list?
Rock Galpin: I haven’t been abroad to anywhere really different from the UK for a while now. Anywhere with a relaxing beach. I’m in the mood for Thailand or Cambodia!
HK: What’s your number-one item you cannot travel without?
RG: Music!
HK: What’s your favourite colour?
RG: At the moment, black, green (I particularly like a colour I call ‘drab green’, which has a tinge of black in it – but it’s quite lively). Other than that I like mustard and orange, but it has to be the right shade. Instead of a washed orange, I love the more rusty tone.
HK: What inspires you?
RG: My inspiration comes from things as well as people. The automotive world and nature is a great example. I love sci-fi and the styling of what futuristic objects can be. In regards to people, Ross Lovegrove, Mark Newson, Ron Arad were all people that inspire me when I was developing my career.
HK: What’s your biggest bugbear?
RG: The biggest frustration is the amount of ideas I have and how many of them I can’t find the people to get them realised. If there’s one thing that we need to develop in this industry are intermediaries who can find that talent and make ideas a reality.

“It was by far the largest sofa I have ever designed.”

As well as designing much of his work for the commercial sector, there are the occasional exception, and when record producer Nellee Hooper approached Galpin to ask him to design a sofa for his studio, he could not refuse. “It was four metres long and made from six different parts,” Galpin explains. “It was by far the largest sofa I have ever designed.” I can’t help but ask what Galpin’s house is like. “The furniture in my house is by no means something I have put together from a blank canvas,” he says chuckling. “A large number of pieces in my place are my own prototypes. It really is a collection of products that don’t necessarily sit well together, but they do represent my journey that I’ve been on. I also have collected a number of Charles & Ray Eames furniture pieces and I am a big fan of the artists Alan Fletcher and Ewan Eason among others. You will also find a lot of Artemide lighting around my place. Other than that, there are a few Habitiat items lying around too.”

As designers go, Galpin strikes me as someone who I believe is keeping the hotel design industry fresh with innovative ideas and the ability to always look ahead. His success has certainly not gone to his head, nor has he reached the peek in his career. I am impressed that a designer can leave such an impression in such a short space of time. But here I am feeling as if I have met another friendly face who I look forward to following as his latest ideas become reality.

Industrial-chic kitchen

TREND ALERT: Daniel Germani predicts rise in industrial-chic surfaces

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The surface experts behind Dekton by Cosentino predict the industrial-chic surface trend to continue to boom in FW18 and beyond…

The ultra-compact surface, Dekton by Cosentino, is responding to popular demand with the development of four matte concrete inspired offerings to expand its Industrial Collection, which launched last year ahead of the curve. The four new colours have once again been designed in collaboration with the renowned Argentinian designer and architect, Daniel Germani, and are the result of careful innovation and research.

The four new colours, Laos, Soke, Kreta and Luna, will launch in the UK from October 2018, and offer a calm and considered aesthetic to suit a range of interiors – from those who wish to fully embrace the industrial look, to those who wish to add a hint of this aesthetic to their design scheme.

Laos – With a nod to industrial materials, Laos is a reinterpretation of cement. Dark in colour and with a weathered appearance, Laos has a matte finish with grey veining and golden tones.

Soke – Inspired by poured concrete, Soke is rich in detail, with realistic ‘cracks’ and grain adding to its aged appearance.  A soft blend of grey hues ensures its versatility in a range of settings, providing a true urban look.

Lunar – Ideally suited to contemporary décor, Lunar is a new take on conventional cement.  Its white base gives it a harmonious and balanced appeal, whilst attention to detail is present in the carefully considered yet seemingly random graining running across its surface.

Kreta – A soft and calming hue, Kreta is uniform in its design, with a sense of depth and an authentic concrete aesthetic.  Offering subtle sophistication, it is perfectly suited to minimalistic environments, from Scandi spaces through to industrial lofts.

 

Australian architect Kerry Hill has died

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The multi-award-winning architect has died at the age of 75 years old…

Australian architect Kerry Hill, who was the creative designer behind some of Asia’s most iconic hotels, has died aged 75.

After graduating as one of the first architecture students from the University of Western Australia in 1968, Hill’s first position in architecture was at Howlett and Bailey in Perth between 1969 to 1971 before founding his eponymous studio a decade later in Singapore. Working extensively throughout tropical Asia and Austrailia over four decades on infamous projects such as Como The Treasury, Perth, Datai Langkawi in Malaysia and Aman Tokyo, Hill’s designs combined abstract statements with locally-influenced accents and themes.

Pioneering context-sensitive structures, an approach that drew from indigenous building techniques and a distinctive thread of modernist aesthetics, Hill’s work formed a key milestone in the development of the region’s current hotel development.

Hill’s death was confirmed by a director at the company’s Perth office, Mr Justin Hill, who is not related to the late Mr Hill and was not prepared to issue a statement on the news.

Hotel Designs would like to extend its deepest sympathy to Hill’s family and close friends as the publication remembers his legacy thst lives on through his dynamic work across the globe.

Main image credit: Nick Cubbin

One designer’s harmony between music and interior design

984 676 Hamish Kilburn

Under blue, cloudless skies in London’s Clerkenwell district, Hamish Kilburn meets Mutina’s Ronan Bouroullec to understand more about his interior design partnership with Domus and how, with a new collection, he has opened up links between music and interior design…

It was while I was watching a panel discussion on interior design tile trends at this year’s Clerkenwell Design Week when the question of what musical instrument our industry is most similar to crossed my mind.

Celebrating the launch of a new partnership between Mutina and Domus, the irregular shapes and uneven tones of the new tile collection, Piano, gave me the answer. Just like an 88-key grand piano, which alone is a striking interior design feature in any room or suite, international hotel design can also strike many chords. While some notes collaborating together are powerful enough to send a shiver down your spine, others effortlessly blend perfectly into the atmosphere. Another similar feature between our industry and monochrome object is the skill and practice that is required to become an ‘expert’ – let alone the many setbacks that are often experienced along the way.

Piano collection

Image credit: Domus

Replicating the percussion instrument in all manners of ways, the Piano range is made with coloured clays to which layers of glaze are added in different widths. There are five base colours: white, grey, blue, green and pink and two rectangular sizes (7.5 x 30cm and 10 x 30cm). The tiles are arranged by colour and are grouped together by the lead colourway in the same box, this allows for the greatest variation and ability to create a vibrant fitted tile layout. Piano is suitable for floors and walls, both indoors and outdoors.

In order to learn more about the new range and the designer behind it, I sat down with Ronan Bouroullec, who is one half of the genius behind Piano.

Image credit: Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec

Image credit: Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec

Hamish Kilburn: Where do you tend to find inspiration for ideas?

Ronan Bouroullec: I look at materials and how they form. I never find inspiration from movies or an experiences in life. It’s always a look and the tactile aspect that inspires me.

HK: Are the challenges always the same when designing products?

RB: No! The challenges are always different. It’s difficult to list them all – there are many, and they are everywhere. I don’t think many people understand how long the process really takes. There are many point of views and opinions that you have to take in along the way, making it a long journey full of many twists and turns.

HK: Can you explain what you meant when you said at Clerkenwell Design Week that you prefer to be less known in the industry?

RB: I like to be in front of people that do not respect me too much. That sounds odd, I know, but I like to be able to prove myself to others. There is always a good reason why I have designed something in such a way, and I enjoy to be in front of someone who would question that, allowing me to explain.

Piano collection

Image credit: Domus

HK: Your latest piece with Domus Tiles is called Piano. Was there a designer growing up that really struck a chord with you?

RB: I was 15 years old when I decided I wanted to be a designer. As far as I can remember, I have always been impressed with objects and things. I had a lot of inspiration along the way but there was not one mentor that I consider to be more superior than the other. They all helped.

HK: What advice would you give to young designers?

RB: My advice would be to work. It can be difficult to survive, at times, but the skill is not to give up.  Try to find other ways to get through it and some years can feel longer than others.

HK: How important is collaboration?

RB: As a designer, you are nothing without collaboration. You can have a good idea, but if there was no one to manufacture it then your idea would only ever be a dream. It would not exist. We work and operate in a collective environment.

HK: How do you react to trends?

RB: Honestly, I don’t want to know about them. I try to do something that I feel is different, new and interesting. Trends have already passed. I try to do something in advance. This can sometimes become a trend, which is very flattering. I like to be copied because people will only ever copy good things.

To read more about the editor’s highlights of Clerkenwell Design Week, click here

Main image credit: Mutina

Hotel Designs confirms Principal of Richmond International as speaker for Meet Up North

1024 537 Hamish Kilburn

Hotel Designs, which is set to take HD Meet Up brand to Manchester this July, has just confirmed Principal of Richmond International, Fiona Thompson, as the headline speaker for the evening…

Hotel Designs has confirmed that Principal of Richmond International, Fiona Thompson, will be the headline speaker at Meet Up North.

Taking place on July 18 at Manchester’s trendy King Street Townhouse, the evening networking event is a bridge between designers, architects, procurement companies and suppliers. Thompson, known in the hotel design industry for working on projects such as The Langham London, Sandy Lane in Barbados and Four Seasons Ten Trinity Square, will speak about past projects and the value of collaboration.

Speaking ahead of the networking event, Thompson said: “Only through a thoughtful collaborative process, which acknowledges individual skills, talents and perspectives, can a project be successfully completed. Richmond International is extremely excited to take part in Meet Up North, an event which honours the significance of professional collaboration, and in turn reflect on the successful partnerships Richmond International has had the pleasure of being part of over the past 51 years.”

“I am delighted to confirm this news that such an established visionary within our industry will be the headline speaker at Meet Up North,” said editor of Hotel Designs Hamish Kilburn. “I’m always fascinated when speaking to Fiona as I believe she has such a natural warmth about her when describing past, present and future projects. She is so ‘in the know’ when it comes to all topics within hotel design and, considering how in-demand she is, we are very grateful that she will join us in Manchester next month.”

Full event details, including start time and location, can be found here.

Our headline partner for this event is Marca Corona whom we announced last month. If you are a supplier to the hotel industry and are interested in attending/supporting this Meet Up please contact Jennie Lane now to find out how you can get involved.

The Hotel Designs summer Meet Up is completely free for hoteliers, interior designers and architects; click here to confirm your attendance.

Andaz Singapore

Miniview: Andaz Singapore – Andre Fu’s design

609 393 Daniel Fountain

Conceived as a contemporary lifestyle destination that embraces the energy of Singapore’s urban spirit, architect Andre Fu and his design studio AFSO seek to capture the city’s eclectic shop-house experience of dining at Andaz Singapore.

Working within the framework of the modernist Duo development by German architect Ole Scheeren, Fu has fashioned a multi layered journey that conveys relaxed luxury yet captures the vibrant atmosphere of local areas such as Kampong Glam and Bras Basah Bugis.

As guests explore the hotel, they will experience a strong sense of discovery – an experience that is quintessential to Singapore itself.

THE ARRIVAL & PANDAN
The Andaz journey begins with a dramatic 8m high lobby where guests encounter an abstract interpretation of the traditional Singaporean shop-house façades which is a recurring theme throughout the hotel. The arrival experience also introduces the concept of a Pandan where guests are enticed by a spectrum of Pandan chiffon cakes and a selection of sweet and savoury soft buns to enjoy.

Andaz SingaporeALLEY ON 25
Conceived as the hub of the hotel, Alley on 25 brings the spirit of the local neighbourhood into a matrix of seven distinct shop-house experiences. Sunroom is an airy timber pavilion with an intricate checkered grid ceiling that has drawn inspirations from the works of modernist architect Schindler. Hanging ferns and greeneries are suspended from the ceiling to entice the guests with a sense of urban retreat. Icehaus , which is crafted in monolithic white Carrera marble has an open kitchen and views to a terrace of frangipani and guests can view live cooking preparations.

Aunties Wok & Steam is an eatery dedicated to the art of steam and wok cooking and has been designed to evoke a lively market dining experience. Decked with tilted metallic windows and timber furniture upholstered in olive green and lemon yellow, this intimately-proportioned dining room offers panoramic views of the city and exemplifies a genuine street-dining spirit. Other shop-houses guest can visit are Bar Square, Smoke & Pepper, Plancha’Lah! and The Green Oven.

Andaz SingaporeTHE GUEST ROOM EXPERIENCE
In-keeping with the alley concept, the experience of the guestroom also embraces the neighborhood spirit. Conceived as a contemporary bungalow, Fu has introduced whimsical moments throughout the room – from the entrance doorbell that is housed in a bespoke post-box, the shop-house doors in bold mango yellow to the floor-to-ceiling ivory paneling. The room experience is also punctuated with ethnic touches in aubergine and mustard yellow to celebrate Singapore as a city.

Andaz SingaporeMR STORK
Nestled high above the hotel is Mr Stork – the destination rooftop bar set within a lush tropical landscape and cobbled paving. At the heart of Mr Stork is a free-standing bronze pavilion, designed as an installation with radial tilted fins reminiscent of a classic wind-mill. The journey is also layered with a series of private tents where guests are invited to escape into a rural dreamscape. The exposed aggregate and tropical landscape reinforce the idea of an urban yet rustic al-fresco experience.

singapore.andaz.hyatt.com/en/hotel/home