Posts Tagged :

Designer

In Conversation With: Jacu Strauss, designer & founder of Lore Studio

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: Jacu Strauss, designer & founder of Lore Studio

An architect or a designer can become one of the most dynamic hoteliers, as editor Hamish Kilburn learns when sitting down with Jacu Strauss, the founder of Lore Studio and the mastermind behind some of the world’s most awe-inspiring hotels…

“Being a great storyteller is essential,” says designer Jacu Strauss as we start discussing what it takes to be a leader in design on the international hotel design scene.

It’s the first time we have caught up properly in a whirlwind three years. We catch up immediately where we left it in 2016, when the designer was putting the finishing touches onto The Pulitzer Amsterdam – an independent hotel project that allowed Strauss to break free with his creativity. “It was a once in a lifetime opportunity,” he says, “that through a cocktail of heavy research, team work and some brave risks turned out to be a tremendous success.”

Growing up in the diamond rich area of South Africa, Strauss moved to New Zealand to train as an architect at the University of Auckland before travelling to London to study at the Bartlett School of Architecture.

After graduating in 2008, Strauss worked as a senior designer at Tom Dixon’s Design Research Studio, and started to add major hospitality projects to his growing portfolio. “My architectural training and education proved helpful and I was responsible for the project from concept development through to completion,” explains Strauss. “As we won larger projects, we were eventually given the green light to design Mondrian at Sea Containers on London’s South Bank. It was there where I completed my first hotel and, eventually, I was offered an exclusive role as Creative Director of what is now called Lore Group.

“Designing a successful hotel is so much more than just choosing colours and fabrics.” – Jacu Strauss

Following the completion of The Pulitzer Amsterdam in 2016, which continues to capture the attention of the world’s media on a mass scale with its timeless yet quirky interiors, Strauss went on to not only design hotels, but also own them by becoming the founder of Lore Studio. “I have not so much changed as become more attune to what does and doesn’t,” he adds. “I have tried to refine how guests and visitors experience our hotels, so it is more than just the visual. It involves a balance of senses that when you get it right means an enjoyable and memorable experience.”

Image of the designer flicking through a book on the floor

Image credit: Emily Andrews

Today, in between jetting around the world being inspired by life’s movement, Strauss and his team are working to complete a new independent hotel, RIGGS Washington DC, a hotel, slated to open in heart of the city at the end of this year, sheltered in what was the Riggs National Bank building. “Washington DC is a city with a particularly strong and quirky evolving hotel and F&B market,” he explains. “So much so, in fact, that there may be another hotel in DC to join the portfolio, but it will be completely different to RIGGS Washington DC.

QUICK-FIRE ROUND:

Hamish Kilburn: What would you like to be if you were not a designer/architect/hotelier?
Jacu Straus: A jeweller

HK: What’s the first rule to learn when designing a hotel?
JS: You can only open the hotel once, so make everything count!

HK: Where is the next hotel design hotspot?
JS: There is a great need for more hotels in urban centres that act as calm retreats for peace from the hustle and bustle of dense cities, but without being gimmicky.

HK: What one hotel would you have liked to have designed/or would like to redesign?
JS: I would have loved to be part of the design team of the Negresco Hotel in Nice. It’s so crazy and magical – I love it.

HK: What is the number one item you cannot travel without?
JS: Tabasco! I always have little sachets of Tabasco in my travel wallet. The little bottles are cute but the sachets are more convenient for travel. Tabasco makes everything taste better.

HK: What trend do you wish would emerge again soon?
JS: Decent table manners.

HK: What was the last hotel you stayed in?
JS: Downtown hotel in Mexico City.

HK: Explain London in three words…
JS: Quiet, polite, multicultural.

HK: What’s your favourite colour this season?
JS: Rust. Something nice about earthier and natural  tones as we move away from sterile palettes.

HK: What’s the last thing that shows up on your credit card statement?
JS: Uber. It is the first item that appears and most of what is inbetween!

As someone as visual as Strauss, the urge the design came as almost a natural instinct. “I think I was always a designer,” he narrates. “My mother says I was always observing my surroundings as a child and I think to this day it’s perhaps one of the reasons that I am doing what I am doing. What I really think makes you a professional designer is being able to process criticism. That you learn over time and does not come naturally.”

“F&B, I believe, is once again thriving in hotels.” – Jacu Strauss

As we converse over cocktails in a rooftop bar overlooking east London, it feels apt to discuss the rise of food and beverage facilities within hotel design. “I think hotels have historically been an important “pillar” in a city or town or community,” he explains. “But towards the end of the last century hotels became massive and exclusive only to its guests, and that meant it became inaccessible to their neighbours. Hotels are unique to their locations and I think guests have become more interested in feeling like they are part of a community even just for a night, than staying at a non-descript hotel that is removed from its surroundings. F&B is a tell-tale sign of how it was once the place to eat and drink, before it then became sterile. F&B, I believe, is once again thriving in hotels – as we’re proving this afternoon – because hotels are opening up to locals as well as guests making it feel less like a “hotel restaurant” and more like a restaurant that happens to be in a hotel.”

In reference to the quick-fire round above, Strauss is a man that believes in detail. “I have realised how important it is to research a new market thoroughly and avoid having a cookie cutter approach,” Strauss explains. “Designing a successful hotel is so much more than just choosing colours and fabrics. It is about the neighbourhoods, the greater contexts of the city and its people, and ensuring the longevity of a product. There are always things to improve on, but we believe you only open a hotel once.”

For the designer who has just as much in the pipeline as what’s already on his impressive portfolio, what makes him stand out his ability to be different. “At some stage,” he adds, “you need to ignore what others are doing and focus on your own task at hand and making decisions based our own hotel and not what others are doing.”

Another distinct characteristic that quite clearly sets Strauss aside from other hoteliers, designers and architects is his ability to effortlessly – on the surface at least – to balance work and life. Living his best life through both travel and work and sometimes a combination of both, Strauss is anything but a one-trick pony, constantly absorbing ideas, concepts and themes that time and time again capture the world’s attention each time the ribbon is cut. And for those wanting a snippet of the inspiration behind his designs, you have only to follow him on Instagram account.

Main image credit: Patrick Meis

St Regis opens “curated mansion” in Hong Kong

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
St Regis opens “curated mansion” in Hong Kong

Renowned interior designer André Fu completes his latest project, St Regis Hong Kong, located in the vibrant district of Wan Chai…

An ode to the cultural diversity and timeless elegance of Hong Kong, The St. Regis Hong Kong has opened and is described as a curated mansion which has been realised through the masterful lens of designer, André Fu.

Design elements throughout the hotel seamlessly combine classic luxury with modern sophistication, incorporating signature details which pay homage to Hong Kong’s rich culture and heritage.

“Hong Kong has always been one of the most attractive destinations for global luxury travelers, and the St. Regis brand is synonymous with timeless luxury and impeccable standards of hospitality,” said Henry Lee, Chief Operations Officer and Managing Director, Greater China, Marriott International. “We are very glad to add The St. Regis Hong Kong to Marriott International’s strong luxury portfolio in the market. The St. Regis Hong Kong represents the very best of the St. Regis brand, with its distinctive design, exquisite fine dining and truly exceptional service.”

Designed for business travellers and culture seekers alike, the 27-storey property boasts 129 appointed guestrooms and suites featuring warm and inviting touches throughout. A residentially-inspired retreat in the heart of Wan Chai, guestrooms at The St. Regis Hong Kong feature wood flooring and accents infused with understated Asian sensibility, deep soaking bathtubs and expansive windows with sweeping views of the harbour and city. The hotel is also home to a heated swimming pool and poolside bar, as well as a health club with a spa treatment room and other luxury amenities.

Image credit: Marriott International/St St Regis

The St. Regis Hong Kong also introduces two exceptional dining concepts to the region with L’Envol and Rùn, each spearheaded by award-winning chefs. At L’Envol, guests can indulge in French Haute cuisine created by chef Olivier Elzer who has accrued a remarkable 18 Michelin stars throughout his career to date. The hotel’s signature Cantonese restaurant, Rùn, is led by renowned chef and winner of the Silver Award in the 2012 Best of the Best Culinary Awards, Hung Chi-Kwong. Famed for his contemporary interpretations of Cantonese cuisine, Chi-Kwong’s restaurant will serve innovative takes on traditional Cantonese fare.

The Drawing Room is an all-day eatery with views of the Terrace. Meanwhile, the St. Regis Bar is a contemporary bar for after-hours digestifs.

The St. Regis Hong Kong is also an all-encompassing events destination with approximately 12,000 sq. ft. of event space across five venues. The sophisticated Astor Ballroom, with its cathedral high ceiling design, is perfectly suited for grand-scale events; while the Rockefeller Room is a versatile space for corporate meetings or more intimate affairs.

The hotel’s opening follows Marriott’s plans to open more than 30 luxury properties this year.

Main image credit: Marriott International/St Regis

Meet Up London: 2 weeks to go!

800 418 Hamish Kilburn

In two weeks time, on March 28, Hotel Designs will host Meet Up London at Minotti London… 

There are just two weeks until the industry’s leaders will gather at Meet Up London. The event, which takes place on March 28 at Minotti London’s showroom will be attended by leading designers, architects, hoteliers and key-industry suppliers.

As well as providing the perfect networking stage for professionals who are working on the hotel design scene, the event will also pay special attention to young designers as it will unveil Hotel Designs’ 30 Under 30 (the shortlist can be accessed here).

The latest names to the guest list include designers, directors and 30 Under 30 shortlisted finalists from the likes of ARA Design, Denis Irvine Studio and Occa Design, as well as the general manager of The Beaumont London.

They will join designers and directors from leading studios such as Richmond InternationalHBA LondonGenslerJestico + WhilesGoddard LittlefairProject Orange and WATG who are among the names that are also confirmed to attend.

How to attend Meet Up London 

If you are an interior designer, architect, operator or hotelier and would like to attend Meet Up London, click here to book your place.

If you are a supplier to the hospitality industry looking to attend the event, contact Zoe Guerrier on 01992 374059 or on z.guerrier@forumevents.co.uk – or click here to book your place.

For more information about becoming a Hotel Designs Meet Up sponsor, contact Zoe Guerrier on 01992 374059 or email z.guerrier@forumevents.co.uk.

Exclusive style partner: Minotti London

Exclusive headline partner: Hamilton Litestat

Event partner: Tarkett

Gifting Partner: Aslotel

In Conversation With: Sebastian Herkner, designer of the year

730 565 Hamish Kilburn

HD

In Conversation With: Sebastian Herkner, designer of the year

At just 37 years old, designer Sebastian Herkner who is known for straddling the boundaries between modernity and tradition, becomes  designer of the year at Maison & Objet. In between Herkner’s press calls and panel discussions, editor Hamish Kilburn caught up with the man of the moment discuss the evolution of his pieces…

What makes Sebastian Herkner a name to remember in the congested industry of interior design is his ability to effortlessly fuse together tradition with creativity.

His approach to design first became commercialised in 2006, after completing his studies at the University of Art and Design at Offenback, when he set up his own studio. His first landmark design, the Bell Table, took no less than three years to find the right manufacturer because of Herkner’s design being ‘ahead of its time’, the double-edge sword of being a leader with creative vision. The table consists of a steel and brass platter that nestles on a hand-blown glass base that was produced in a centuries-old Bavarian glass factory.

The bell table by Sebastian Herkner

Image caption: The Bell Table

His appetite for a challenge and his desire to explore unchartered territories has not only led him to design glasses, bicycles and perfume bottles or make forays into the world of interior design, but also to embark on an internship with fashion designer Stella McCartney during the course of his studies. “I was interested in the manufacturing processes used in fashion, and understanding how colours are put together” he explains. The flair for combining colours he honed whilst there now underpins his signature style. “Colour is often the very last thing designers think about. For me, it’s always the starting point for the whole design process”. He does admit, nonetheless, that “it can take years to find that perfect colour combination”.

“I want my products to become companions, which I believe is very important these days in order to create timeless pieces.”

Fast-forward 15 years from when he opened his first studio, and more than 120 product launches later, Herkner is today centre stage at one of the world’s most reputable design fairs, Maison & Objet, being dubbed the ‘designer of the year’, a title that feels not only thoroughly deserved but also one that feels totally appropriate for the man who never looks back. “My designs are not driven by target groups, they are more driven by quality and functionality, while mixing new technologies and materials with craftsmanship and colours,” Herkner explains. “I want my products to become companions, which I believe is very important these days in order to create timeless pieces.” These ‘companions’ sit in harmony at the show, exhibiting the designer’s journey.

Clip Chair for De Vorm

Image caption: Sebastian Herkner’s Clip Chair for De Vorm

Be it in his studio, surrounded by a six -strong team that herald from all four corners of the world, or during his frequent trips to China, Colombia, Thailand, Senegal and Canada visiting local manufacturers , design houses and craftsmen, Herkner has a longstanding habit of quenching his thirst for ideas elsewhere. “Different cultures, skills and lifestyles all fuel my inspiration” he explains . He also finds his inspiration in traditional materials, such as ceramics, leather, marble and also in art. Another of his iconic pieces, the “Oda” floor lamp (Pulpo , 2014), bears testament to that . Resembling a reservoir of light, the design was directly inspired by photographic images of water towers captured by Bernd and Hilla Becher. Every single source of inspiration is perfectly in tune with his quest for authenticity, his desire to use sustainable materials , and his sense of respect for the time it takes to create a truly stunning piece.

Bulbous glass light on floor

Image credit: “Oda” floor lamp (Pulpo , 2014)

Quick-fire round

Hamish Kilburn: What colour are you finding interesting at the moment? 
Sebastian Herkner: Salmon pink (in Matt)

HK: What is the one item you cannot travel without:
SH: My phone. I am addicted! 

HK: Where is next on your travel bucket list? 
SH: I would love to go to Peru. Big cities, unfortunately, look all the same. 

HK: Is there a trend that you hate? 
SH: When people choose to infuse ‘soft Skandi’ in their interiors. I love the Scandinavian look and feel, but I feel as if people should use it with more courage and strength. 

HK: Would you change anything in the last ten years?
SH: No, nothing. 

For a designer who is known for being ahead of his time when it comes to his ability to combine functionality with technology, I am somewhat taken aback when Herkner suggests that the industry has to some extent gone too far. “Smart homes is one thing, but i believe that furniture will remain still because they are designed for human beings,” he explains. “We need somewhere to sit, and I do not believe there is any need for charging sockets in the sofa – in the table, perhaps, but not the sofa.

Herkner’s recent accolade gives him a platform to unveil some of his latest creations whilst simultaneously showcasing the manufacturing processes that have always been so close to his heart.

Main image credit: Sebastian Herkner/Gany Gerster 

In Conversation With: Moritz Waldemeyer, lighting designer to the stars

950 633 Hamish Kilburn

Lighting designer Moritz Waldemeyer speaks to editor Hamish Kilburn about 2019 trends, the power of lighting therapy and how one moment in time can dramatically change the direction of a creative’s career…  

Anyone who has had the pleasure to spend more than five minutes in the company of the multi-talented Moritz Waldemeyer will agree with me when I say that he is a breath of creative, fresh air. Despite having designed LED pieces for major players in popular culture such as music icons Ellie Goulding, WillIAm, Take That and fashion design hero Philip Treacy OBE, Waldemeyer’s head has always remained cool when working on many creative platforms.

Following a career-defining moment of lighting a costume collection for the closing ceremonies of both the 2016 Rio Olympic and Paralympic Games, Waldemeyer’s recent gaze in the hospitality industry saw him at the centre of many interesting conversations at London Design Festival last year. His personalised lighting installation entitled Journey of Colour at Focus18 raised eyebrows among designers from around the world on the potential of lighting within hotel design. “Timing is everything,” Waldemeyer says. “My knowledge of technology, which is an area that has always interested me, placed me in the design sphere with a unique skillset at the right time.”

WAVE chandelier in Intercontinental Davos, which is 1,400 hand-blown glass spheres swirl in a playful shape of a gust of snow,

Image caption: WAVE chandelier in Intercontinental Davos, which is 1,400 hand-blown glass spheres swirl in a playful shape of a gust of snow,

Waldemeyer’s journey in the world of fashion, design and lighting started with an early interest for technology. Following his studies on mechatronics at Kings College London, Waldemeyer began experimenting with his passion for lighting – and after graduating, he gained experience working for Phillips in the product development team. It was at this moment in time, while other employees were working the nine-to-five, when Waldemeyer started to experiment with lighting and its boundaries. His forward-thinking attitude soon sparked the attention of the fashion world, which led to what was arguably his first major career break.

Virtual Reality – Moritz Waldemeyer for Philip Treacy

Image caption: Virtual Reality – Moritz Waldemeyer for Philip Treacy

Paris Fashion Week 2007 witnessed Hussein Chayalan showcase dresses impregnated with servo-driven lasers that were engineered and programmed by Waldemeyer. With the aim to create a sensational atmosphere that captured the attention of the world’s media, Chayalan turned to Waldemeyer to emit laser beams from the dresses on the models who strutted spectacularly down the catwalk. “It’s a great, indescribable feeling to be part of fashion history,” Waldemeyer shares. “And it was after this show I realised just how revolutionary this was when figures in the music industry got in touch asking me how I could work with them to create visual experiences.”

“I am looking at animated lighting, which is super retro and exciting.”

Waldemeyer’s dip into the world of high-fashion, I believe, gives him a unique leverage when it comes to helping to transform lighting within hotel interior design spaces. But when it comes to looking ahead, it seems as if Waldemeyer is left wondering like the rest of us what defines a ‘trend’. “It’s really difficult to look at trends on a year-by-year basis, because I believe that the development isn’t that fast in lighting,” he comments. “However, from my point of view, we have yet to establish the limits of LED potential. I am looking at animated lighting, which is super retro and exciting.”

Flos presented this stunning collaborative project during the Milan Salone 2009 which involved no less than 5 well known contributors: design by Philippe Starck, text by Jenny Holzer, execution by Flos, crystal by Baccarat and custom electronic design by Moritz Waldemeyer.

Image caption: Flos presented this stunning collaborative project during the Milan Salone 2009 which involved no less than five well known contributors: design by Philippe Starck, text by Jenny Holzer, execution by Flos, crystal by Baccarat and custom electronic design by Moritz Waldemeyer.

Following on from our insight into how the public areas of hotels are changing, there has been many debates about how the lobby and the guestroom can continue to evolve into new eras. Technology within lighting has unlocked the door to welcome in the opportunity of more atmospheric areas within the hotel, which is arguably the key to create the personalised hotel of the future. “Considering that the lobby is the first area that guests walk in to, I believe there is room for designers to be more playful,” he explains. “When it comes to the guestroom, though, I believe we as lighting experts need to ensure that we are creating intuitive lighting that works with the user. It’s a challenge to ensure we are creating seamless lighting experiences that don’t hinder the overall guest experience. It’s sometimes easy to forget when working on large pieces to view the experience from a guests’ point of view, but this is so important when it comes to the design of the lighting.”

“We deliberately use a lot of colour, which is arguably therapeutic with the aim to bring people back to themselves.”

One area within the interior design of hotels that continues to divide opinions is understanding the fundamental purpose of lighting in the guestroom. While designers aim to firmly establish lighting’s functional properties as well as its decorative qualities within the guestroom, there are questions rippling through the industry on how wellbeing can be incorporated within hotel design, and Waldemeyer may have the answer. He explains: “We deliberately use a lot of colour, which is arguably therapeutic with the aim to bring people back to themselves. Art pieces that use light to encourage calmness ­– similar to watching a roaring open fire – somewhat sedates the tone of the room and the guests’ minds. Using colour in this way has the complete opposite reaction to what happens when we as consumers stare mindlessly at our phones or devices.”

Moritz Waldemeyer's personalised lighting installation, Journey of Colour, was exhibited at Focus 18.

Image caption: Moritz Waldemeyer’s personalised lighting installation, Journey of Colour, was exhibited at Focus 18.

Waldemeyer strikes me as someone who is constantly looking ahead to establish new ways to be creative with lighting. “I’m excited about craftsmanship, which is really big on our agenda at the moment,” says Waldemeyer. “Travelling the world has allowed me to establish new avenues and my task at the moment is to understand how we can present traditional craftsmanship in lighting to a modern audience, which is challenging but also so rewarding at the same time.”

Waldemeyer’s own ‘journey of colour’ is, I believe, still in the very early stages when establishing what is possible within the future of commercial lighting. I leave the creative with focused lenses, now being able to zoom in to understand further the emotional links between our minds and how our hotels are lit. One of the largest conclusions, though, is seeing how outside influences, from areas such as fashion and popular music, can absolutely shed some light on the direction our industry should be heading when it comes to forward-thinking an innovation.

Moritz Waldemeyer Studio is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, click here.

Main image credit: Moritz Waldemeyer Studio

Architecture meets fashion: Zaha Hadid Design’s latest collaboration weaves a new direction in sportswear technology

640 400 Hamish Kilburn
Design giant Zaha Hadid Design unveils collaboration with a Swiss performance sportswear brand, suggesting that inspiration for designers and architects is not limited to one – or even two – industries. Hamish Kilburn investigates…

A designer recently told me that that it’s imperative to be at the edge of curve in design, to always think ahead of the present – sometimes as much as fives years ahead. But, in an industry that is forever forward-thinking, can we, as creatives, benefit from taking inspiration from other those far removed from the front line of design and architecture. One of the most well-known brands in the design sphere, Zaha Hadid Design, believes so. The firm has found common ground with a Swiss performance sportswear brand, Odlo, and through a thoroughly researched two-year collaboration, the two companies have recently unveiled Odlo Futureskin to the world, a new baselayer for winter performance sports that has been created with design and architecture at its core.

The idea that sportswear isn’t always sexy is what sparked the opportunity for Odlo to reach out to the design and architecture arena for some inspiration when creating the next chapter for next-to-skin sportswear. Inspired by its seamless design qualities, the company approached Zaha Hadid Design with the brief in December 2016. The true collaboration between both brands – in knowledge, research and resources – resulted in the birth of Odlo Futureskin, a baselayer that is arguably the most technically advanced on the market. The garmet is smart. So smart that it controls the flow of air and adapts to breathing and even movement. The ‘body mapping’ technology allows the garment to act like a second skin – and in full  Zaha Hadid Design spirit, it’s also seamless.

The engineered baselayer tops for men and women formed in the same manner as most of the Zaha Hadid Archtiects projects come together; with the combination of visual ideas, extensive research and the desire to push boundaries and challenge conventional design.

Two years after first putting pen to paper, following much planning – and even more prototypes – the companies gathered at the Zaha Hadid Gallery in London on a late October evening for the global launch of Odlo Futureskin.

Through this unique collaboration, which has no sign of ending as Zaha Hadid Design unveils that it will continue to work with Odlo for the sportswear brand’s SS19 female line, both companies have opened up new avenues for inspiration among designers, architects and sportswear brands, further proving that great ideas comes from thinking outside the box.

Meanwhile, Zaha Hadid Architects continues to show that it’s at the top of the architectural food chain, as it has recently completed the Morpheus in Macau and it presses ahead to complete Malta’s Murcury Tower, which will shelter a new boutique hotel.

If you have looked to other industries for inspiration when designing a product or project, our editorial team want to hear from you. Tweet us @HotelDesigns 

Brit List 2018 long list announced

1024 566 Hamish Kilburn
This year’s Brit List has officially announced the 2018 long list as it heads towards the final straight to finding Britain’s top interior designers, hoteliers and architects…

Hotel Designs has announced the long-listed interior designers, hoteliers and architects that are all in with a chance of making it into The Brit List 2018.

The long-listed finalists will be invited to BEAT London on November 22 when The Brit List 2018 will be unveiled to highlight the top 25 interior designers, top 25 hoteliers and the top 25 architects in Britain today.

The nationwide search began months ago when Hotel Designs opened up nominations to readers of the publication in order to enter whom they believed deserved to be recognised as British leaders and influencers in international hotel design.

There are limited spaces available to attend this year’s highly anticipated event. In order to purchase your tickets and to secure your place, click here.

Below are the long-listed candidates for this year’s Brit List.

Contantina Tsoutsikou HBA London
Andrew Linwood Areen Hospitality
Ariane Steinbeck RPW Design
Bee Osborn Osborn Interiors
Emma King InterContinental Group
Dexter Moren Associates Dexter Moren Associates
Tim Murray Helen Green Design
Alex Kravetz Alex Kravetz Design
Fiona Thompson Richmond International
Martin Brudnizki MBDS
Rachel Johnson Wimberly Interiors
Terry McGinnity GA Design London
Jo Littlefair Goddard Littlefair
Kelly Hoppen Kelly Hoppen Design Interiors Ltd
Maria Vafiadis MKV Design
Christopher Ash Project Orange
Katherine Neathercoat Scott Brownrigg
Tara Bernerd Tara Bernerd & Partners
Robert Angell Robert Angell Design International
Helen Fewster Suna Interior Design
Rebecca Hunt Suna Interior Design
Frances Blackham Trevillion Interiors
Harry Harris SUSD
Stephanie Dennett Brakspear
Nicholas Stoupas Twenty2Degrees
Joesph Stella Twenty2Degrees
Tom Bartlett Waldo Works
Harry Gregory Ara Design
Rock Galpin Rock Galpin Ltd
Kathleen Hockney Cole & Son
Nicholas Sunderland NSI Design Ltd
Kim Partridge Kim Partridge Interiors
Rami Fustok The Mandrake
Conor O’Leary Gleneagles, Scotland
Jenny Oh King Street Townhouse
Johnson Joseph LALIT, London
Brian Benson The Gainsborough
Mario Ovsenjak Hotel Gotham
Jasdeep Sodhi Hotel Indigo, 1 Leicester Square
Robin Sheppard Bespoke Hotels
Jennifer McCabe Charlotte Street Hotel
Fiona Moores The Pig at Combe
Faye Stone The Pig in the Wall
Sarah Holden The Pig near Bath
Peter Kienast The Principle, Manchester
Michael Achenbaum The Curtain, London
Gareth Banner The Ned, London
Thomas Kochs The Corinthia, London
Michael Bonsor The Rosewood, London
David Morgan-Hewitt The Goring, London
Kevin Brooke Cliveden House
Nick Hanson Idle Rocks Hotel, St Mawes
Will Ashworth Watergate Hotel
Marco Novella The Lanesborough
Nathan White Seaham Hall
Paul Walsh Hotel Football
Mark Sainsbury Zetter Hotels
Michael Helling The Grove, Hertfordshire
Barney Cunliffe The Gilpin
Sergio Leandro Mondrian London
Chris Weaver High Road House
Debrah Dhugga Dukes Hotel
James Twomey Reardon Smith
Gordon Ferrier 3D Reid Architecture
Richard Morton Richard Morton Architects
James Dilley Jestico + Whiles
Julian Dickens Jestico + Whiles
Liz Pickard Consarc Architects
Martin Pease WATG
David Richard Mellor David Richard Mellor
John Simpson John Simpson Architects
Maha Kutay Zaha Hadid Architects
Woody Yao Zaha Hadid Architects
Tommy Lee PLP Architecture
Phil Jaffa Scape Design Associates
Georgia Stevenson SHH Architects and Interior Designers
Tom Lindblom Gensler
Richard Hywel Evans Studio RHE
Caroline Smith Wish London
Yasmin Mahmoudieh Yasmine Mahmoudieh
Jonathan Manser The Manser Practice
Nathalie Rozencwajg Rare Architecture
Mark Bruce EPR Architects
Geoff Hull EPR Architects
David Archer Archer Humphreys Architects
Howard Jones Archer Humphreys Architects
Abinitio Architects & Planners Abinitio Architects & Planners

This year, as well as celebrating The Brit List 2018, the awards will launch six coveted awards. These include:

  • Inspiration in Design – Innovative use of Technology
  • Inspiration in Design – Boutique Hotelier
  • Inspiration in Design – Interior Designer of the Year
  • Inspiration in Design – Architect of the Year
  • The Eco Award
  • Outstanding Contribution to the Hotel Industry

Shortlist finalists: Inspiration in Design – Innovative use of Technology

  • Meystyle – Product: LED wallpaper and fabric
  • Moritz Waldemeyer – Product: LDF18 Lighting installation
  • Aquavision
  • Criton
  • ACT STUDIOS
  • Hotel Room Chooser

Shortlist finalists: The Eco Award

  • Tate Harmer – Project: Eden Hotel
  • Deadgood – Project: Hug Chair
  • Interface  – Product: All products
  •  Ecolight
  • Zetter Hotels

Event timings: 6.30 p.m. – 10.30 p.m.

6.30 p.m. Welcome drinks are served
7.00 p.m. Welcome speech from Hotel Designs Editor, Hamish Kilburn, to include unveiling of The Brit List 2018 winners
7.15 p.m. Canapés are served
7.15 p.m. Headline speaker addresses The Brit List 2018
7.30 p.m. Awards presentation commences
8.00 p.m. Headline speaker addresses The Brit List 2018
8.15 p.m. Celebrations and networking

In order to secure you place, click here to purchase tickets. 

To discuss the various sponsorship packages available, please contact Katy Phillips on +44(0)1992 374050

BRIT LIST 2018 Industry partner: British Institute of Interior Design

Talking furniture trends with Rock Galpin

Hamish Kilburn

From designing celeb hot spots in London to creating award-winning contract furniture collections, Rock Galpin is a fountain of knowledge when it comes to cutting-edge product design, interiors and understanding the trends as editor of Hotel Designs Hamish Kilburn learns after meeting the designer at London Design Festival…

It was at the beginning of London Design Festival (LDF), at an after-party in The Curtain to be precise, when and where I first had the pleasure of meeting the award-winning furniture designer Rock Galpin. Having just flown in that evening following a trip to the sun-trapped island of Rhodes, Galpin was in London to assess the trends while also using the week as a fine opportunity to catch up with old and new clients and friends, two categories are separated only by what I can describe as a faint line in the sand. Among them was Galpin with a friendly and approachable demeanour that draws me in to want to understand the man behind the designer.

One week later, as the dust starts to settle on the Capital, Galpin and I are meeting for coffee to discuss trends, industry success and innovation in design. “So this is what I’m working on at the moment and what I wanted to show you,” he says as he opens the laptop to reveal his ‘top secret’ design renders and plans, which, without giving too much away, inspire me to realise that the future of contract furniture is turning a page to an exciting chapter. “As a designer that is working in the commercial sector, I’m often looking up to 10 years ahead of the now,” he explains. Galpin’s logic is that you have to allow two-to-four years before your design, once commissioned, will even enter the production phase. “In addition, you want to design a product that has a minimum shelf life of at least five years,” he explains. For Galpin, who to my eyes has the patience of a saint being able to sit on designs for that long, the contract furniture product of the future will operate in a tech-driven scene, allowing for a seamless experience. He explains: “I want to ideally create an environment whereby technology is completely invisible.” His vision comes as, somehow, despite the growing demand in tech-driven experiences, certain technologies have not evolved and personalisation continues to be a really interesting topic. “Maybe the chair will physically mold to fit the user, or maybe the table will organically allow the user to be sat in the best state physically as mentally,” he adds. “I have a few ideas on how we can do this.”

Image caption: Render of Matrix 6 collection by Rock Galpin

Working so far ahead is a challenge for any creative, and getting the balance right between being creative and being commercially appealing is key, as Galpin explains: “I have come to realise that people will accept incremental changes in design and not large leaps. Of course, there are exceptions to that, just take the Google’s offices as an example. However, I do believe that clients and consumers prefer to see a more gradual progression in product design as we move forward.”

“I have noticed that colour seems to come in when we are experiencing a repressed or depressing economic time.”

With this year’s Brit List around the corner, and LDF continuing to prove that it is at the centre of the design world, Galpin is quite obviously proud to be a British designer. “Britain always seems to have this breath and eclectic, inventive population that, I suppose, being an island as well, can incubate ideas. Other countries can’t do that as well,” says Galpin as we start discussing London as a major international design hub. “We’re going softer and softer as an aesthetic when it comes to shapes and forms. Interestingly, though, colours have become really powerful this season,” he says. “We’re seeing a lot of vibrant colours and citrus accents; blues and pinks are very much around. I have noticed that bold colours seem to creep in and actually the integrity of design evolves when we are experiencing a repressed or depressing economic period because designers need to work harder in order to tick certain boxes. I have noticed that in the most demanding times come some of the best designs. The ’80s were a great example of this. But immediately after, of course, we experience the complete opposite. They called it ‘green’ design which was a way of becoming more sustainable, raw and eco-friendly.”

Galpin’s ability to work the room at any event was evident at LDF and is the direct result of years of hard work in order to establish himself in the industry as a rightful leader. His first major break, though, came when he was asked to design a furniture line for ARAM, which, along with Terence Conran, was one of the most significant – and most important – furniture brands at the time. “It was a really nice journey, and allowed me to work closely with Zeev Aram,” he says smiling. “I did a sofa and table collection for them right at the beginning of my career. It took two and half years, and it was a truly lovely process.” The modular sofa system and range of tables made fame in 1993. Aimed at the design savvy contract market, the Kama sofas and Sutra Tables also appealed to the clean-living domestic market.

“As a result of the collaboration, in 2005, Galpin won the Laurent-Perrier Design Award.”

Image caption: Sketch sofa by Designers Guild, designed by Rock Galpin

Other milestones in Galpin’s full career include designing The Bombay Sapphire Experience and London’s Punk Nightclub, which became a favourite for the likes of Kate Moss and her entourage. However, one of the most impressive moments, from where I am sitting at least, is Galpin’s collaboration with Designers Guild. Applying for a competition in order to collaborate with the brand, he pitched his designs along with 30 other designers and won. The project enabled him to work with Tricia Guild OBE and the manufacturers B-Design in southern Italy, which produces furniture for the likes of Minotti, Cappellini and Thonet. As a result of the collaboration, in 2005, Galpin won the Laurent-Perrier Design Award for the Sketch Sofa and Easy Lounger. “The whole journey was fantastic from drawing and designing right through to production,” Galpin adds. One year later, Galpin continued to be at the forefront of the international design scene by unveiling the Mark 1, which was awarded runner up for the same award.

Quick-fire round:

Hamish Kilburn: Where’s next on your travel bucket list?
Rock Galpin: I haven’t been abroad to anywhere really different from the UK for a while now. Anywhere with a relaxing beach. I’m in the mood for Thailand or Cambodia!
HK: What’s your number-one item you cannot travel without?
RG: Music!
HK: What’s your favourite colour?
RG: At the moment, black, green (I particularly like a colour I call ‘drab green’, which has a tinge of black in it – but it’s quite lively). Other than that I like mustard and orange, but it has to be the right shade. Instead of a washed orange, I love the more rusty tone.
HK: What inspires you?
RG: My inspiration comes from things as well as people. The automotive world and nature is a great example. I love sci-fi and the styling of what futuristic objects can be. In regards to people, Ross Lovegrove, Mark Newson, Ron Arad were all people that inspire me when I was developing my career.
HK: What’s your biggest bugbear?
RG: The biggest frustration is the amount of ideas I have and how many of them I can’t find the people to get them realised. If there’s one thing that we need to develop in this industry are intermediaries who can find that talent and make ideas a reality.

“It was by far the largest sofa I have ever designed.”

As well as designing much of his work for the commercial sector, there are the occasional exception, and when record producer Nellee Hooper approached Galpin to ask him to design a sofa for his studio, he could not refuse. “It was four metres long and made from six different parts,” Galpin explains. “It was by far the largest sofa I have ever designed.” I can’t help but ask what Galpin’s house is like. “The furniture in my house is by no means something I have put together from a blank canvas,” he says chuckling. “A large number of pieces in my place are my own prototypes. It really is a collection of products that don’t necessarily sit well together, but they do represent my journey that I’ve been on. I also have collected a number of Charles & Ray Eames furniture pieces and I am a big fan of the artists Alan Fletcher and Ewan Eason among others. You will also find a lot of Artemide lighting around my place. Other than that, there are a few Habitiat items lying around too.”

As designers go, Galpin strikes me as someone who I believe is keeping the hotel design industry fresh with innovative ideas and the ability to always look ahead. His success has certainly not gone to his head, nor has he reached the peek in his career. I am impressed that a designer can leave such an impression in such a short space of time. But here I am feeling as if I have met another friendly face who I look forward to following as his latest ideas become reality.

Industrial-chic kitchen

TREND ALERT: Daniel Germani predicts rise in industrial-chic surfaces

1024 922 Hamish Kilburn

The surface experts behind Dekton by Cosentino predict the industrial-chic surface trend to continue to boom in FW18 and beyond…

The ultra-compact surface, Dekton by Cosentino, is responding to popular demand with the development of four matte concrete inspired offerings to expand its Industrial Collection, which launched last year ahead of the curve. The four new colours have once again been designed in collaboration with the renowned Argentinian designer and architect, Daniel Germani, and are the result of careful innovation and research.

The four new colours, Laos, Soke, Kreta and Luna, will launch in the UK from October 2018, and offer a calm and considered aesthetic to suit a range of interiors – from those who wish to fully embrace the industrial look, to those who wish to add a hint of this aesthetic to their design scheme.

Laos – With a nod to industrial materials, Laos is a reinterpretation of cement. Dark in colour and with a weathered appearance, Laos has a matte finish with grey veining and golden tones.

Soke – Inspired by poured concrete, Soke is rich in detail, with realistic ‘cracks’ and grain adding to its aged appearance.  A soft blend of grey hues ensures its versatility in a range of settings, providing a true urban look.

Lunar – Ideally suited to contemporary décor, Lunar is a new take on conventional cement.  Its white base gives it a harmonious and balanced appeal, whilst attention to detail is present in the carefully considered yet seemingly random graining running across its surface.

Kreta – A soft and calming hue, Kreta is uniform in its design, with a sense of depth and an authentic concrete aesthetic.  Offering subtle sophistication, it is perfectly suited to minimalistic environments, from Scandi spaces through to industrial lofts.

 

Australian architect Kerry Hill has died

638 425 Hamish Kilburn

The multi-award-winning architect has died at the age of 75 years old…

Australian architect Kerry Hill, who was the creative designer behind some of Asia’s most iconic hotels, has died aged 75.

After graduating as one of the first architecture students from the University of Western Australia in 1968, Hill’s first position in architecture was at Howlett and Bailey in Perth between 1969 to 1971 before founding his eponymous studio a decade later in Singapore. Working extensively throughout tropical Asia and Austrailia over four decades on infamous projects such as Como The Treasury, Perth, Datai Langkawi in Malaysia and Aman Tokyo, Hill’s designs combined abstract statements with locally-influenced accents and themes.

Pioneering context-sensitive structures, an approach that drew from indigenous building techniques and a distinctive thread of modernist aesthetics, Hill’s work formed a key milestone in the development of the region’s current hotel development.

Hill’s death was confirmed by a director at the company’s Perth office, Mr Justin Hill, who is not related to the late Mr Hill and was not prepared to issue a statement on the news.

Hotel Designs would like to extend its deepest sympathy to Hill’s family and close friends as the publication remembers his legacy thst lives on through his dynamic work across the globe.

Main image credit: Nick Cubbin

One designer’s harmony between music and interior design

984 676 Hamish Kilburn

Under blue, cloudless skies in London’s Clerkenwell district, Hamish Kilburn meets Mutina’s Ronan Bouroullec to understand more about his interior design partnership with Domus and how, with a new collection, he has opened up links between music and interior design…

It was while I was watching a panel discussion on interior design tile trends at this year’s Clerkenwell Design Week when the question of what musical instrument our industry is most similar to crossed my mind.

Celebrating the launch of a new partnership between Mutina and Domus, the irregular shapes and uneven tones of the new tile collection, Piano, gave me the answer. Just like an 88-key grand piano, which alone is a striking interior design feature in any room or suite, international hotel design can also strike many chords. While some notes collaborating together are powerful enough to send a shiver down your spine, others effortlessly blend perfectly into the atmosphere. Another similar feature between our industry and monochrome object is the skill and practice that is required to become an ‘expert’ – let alone the many setbacks that are often experienced along the way.

Piano collection

Image credit: Domus

Replicating the percussion instrument in all manners of ways, the Piano range is made with coloured clays to which layers of glaze are added in different widths. There are five base colours: white, grey, blue, green and pink and two rectangular sizes (7.5 x 30cm and 10 x 30cm). The tiles are arranged by colour and are grouped together by the lead colourway in the same box, this allows for the greatest variation and ability to create a vibrant fitted tile layout. Piano is suitable for floors and walls, both indoors and outdoors.

In order to learn more about the new range and the designer behind it, I sat down with Ronan Bouroullec, who is one half of the genius behind Piano.

Image credit: Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec

Image credit: Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec

Hamish Kilburn: Where do you tend to find inspiration for ideas?

Ronan Bouroullec: I look at materials and how they form. I never find inspiration from movies or an experiences in life. It’s always a look and the tactile aspect that inspires me.

HK: Are the challenges always the same when designing products?

RB: No! The challenges are always different. It’s difficult to list them all – there are many, and they are everywhere. I don’t think many people understand how long the process really takes. There are many point of views and opinions that you have to take in along the way, making it a long journey full of many twists and turns.

HK: Can you explain what you meant when you said at Clerkenwell Design Week that you prefer to be less known in the industry?

RB: I like to be in front of people that do not respect me too much. That sounds odd, I know, but I like to be able to prove myself to others. There is always a good reason why I have designed something in such a way, and I enjoy to be in front of someone who would question that, allowing me to explain.

Piano collection

Image credit: Domus

HK: Your latest piece with Domus Tiles is called Piano. Was there a designer growing up that really struck a chord with you?

RB: I was 15 years old when I decided I wanted to be a designer. As far as I can remember, I have always been impressed with objects and things. I had a lot of inspiration along the way but there was not one mentor that I consider to be more superior than the other. They all helped.

HK: What advice would you give to young designers?

RB: My advice would be to work. It can be difficult to survive, at times, but the skill is not to give up.  Try to find other ways to get through it and some years can feel longer than others.

HK: How important is collaboration?

RB: As a designer, you are nothing without collaboration. You can have a good idea, but if there was no one to manufacture it then your idea would only ever be a dream. It would not exist. We work and operate in a collective environment.

HK: How do you react to trends?

RB: Honestly, I don’t want to know about them. I try to do something that I feel is different, new and interesting. Trends have already passed. I try to do something in advance. This can sometimes become a trend, which is very flattering. I like to be copied because people will only ever copy good things.

To read more about the editor’s highlights of Clerkenwell Design Week, click here

Main image credit: Mutina

Hotel Designs confirms Principal of Richmond International as speaker for Meet Up North

1024 537 Hamish Kilburn

Hotel Designs, which is set to take HD Meet Up brand to Manchester this July, has just confirmed Principal of Richmond International, Fiona Thompson, as the headline speaker for the evening…

Hotel Designs has confirmed that Principal of Richmond International, Fiona Thompson, will be the headline speaker at Meet Up North.

Taking place on July 18 at Manchester’s trendy King Street Townhouse, the evening networking event is a bridge between designers, architects, procurement companies and suppliers. Thompson, known in the hotel design industry for working on projects such as The Langham London, Sandy Lane in Barbados and Four Seasons Ten Trinity Square, will speak about past projects and the value of collaboration.

Speaking ahead of the networking event, Thompson said: “Only through a thoughtful collaborative process, which acknowledges individual skills, talents and perspectives, can a project be successfully completed. Richmond International is extremely excited to take part in Meet Up North, an event which honours the significance of professional collaboration, and in turn reflect on the successful partnerships Richmond International has had the pleasure of being part of over the past 51 years.”

“I am delighted to confirm this news that such an established visionary within our industry will be the headline speaker at Meet Up North,” said editor of Hotel Designs Hamish Kilburn. “I’m always fascinated when speaking to Fiona as I believe she has such a natural warmth about her when describing past, present and future projects. She is so ‘in the know’ when it comes to all topics within hotel design and, considering how in-demand she is, we are very grateful that she will join us in Manchester next month.”

Full event details, including start time and location, can be found here.

Our headline partner for this event is Marca Corona whom we announced last month. If you are a supplier to the hotel industry and are interested in attending/supporting this Meet Up please contact Jennie Lane now to find out how you can get involved.

The Hotel Designs summer Meet Up is completely free for hoteliers, interior designers and architects; click here to confirm your attendance.

Andaz Singapore

Miniview: Andaz Singapore – Andre Fu’s design

609 393 Daniel Fountain

Conceived as a contemporary lifestyle destination that embraces the energy of Singapore’s urban spirit, architect Andre Fu and his design studio AFSO seek to capture the city’s eclectic shop-house experience of dining at Andaz Singapore.

Working within the framework of the modernist Duo development by German architect Ole Scheeren, Fu has fashioned a multi layered journey that conveys relaxed luxury yet captures the vibrant atmosphere of local areas such as Kampong Glam and Bras Basah Bugis.

As guests explore the hotel, they will experience a strong sense of discovery – an experience that is quintessential to Singapore itself.

THE ARRIVAL & PANDAN
The Andaz journey begins with a dramatic 8m high lobby where guests encounter an abstract interpretation of the traditional Singaporean shop-house façades which is a recurring theme throughout the hotel. The arrival experience also introduces the concept of a Pandan where guests are enticed by a spectrum of Pandan chiffon cakes and a selection of sweet and savoury soft buns to enjoy.

Andaz SingaporeALLEY ON 25
Conceived as the hub of the hotel, Alley on 25 brings the spirit of the local neighbourhood into a matrix of seven distinct shop-house experiences. Sunroom is an airy timber pavilion with an intricate checkered grid ceiling that has drawn inspirations from the works of modernist architect Schindler. Hanging ferns and greeneries are suspended from the ceiling to entice the guests with a sense of urban retreat. Icehaus , which is crafted in monolithic white Carrera marble has an open kitchen and views to a terrace of frangipani and guests can view live cooking preparations.

Aunties Wok & Steam is an eatery dedicated to the art of steam and wok cooking and has been designed to evoke a lively market dining experience. Decked with tilted metallic windows and timber furniture upholstered in olive green and lemon yellow, this intimately-proportioned dining room offers panoramic views of the city and exemplifies a genuine street-dining spirit. Other shop-houses guest can visit are Bar Square, Smoke & Pepper, Plancha’Lah! and The Green Oven.

Andaz SingaporeTHE GUEST ROOM EXPERIENCE
In-keeping with the alley concept, the experience of the guestroom also embraces the neighborhood spirit. Conceived as a contemporary bungalow, Fu has introduced whimsical moments throughout the room – from the entrance doorbell that is housed in a bespoke post-box, the shop-house doors in bold mango yellow to the floor-to-ceiling ivory paneling. The room experience is also punctuated with ethnic touches in aubergine and mustard yellow to celebrate Singapore as a city.

Andaz SingaporeMR STORK
Nestled high above the hotel is Mr Stork – the destination rooftop bar set within a lush tropical landscape and cobbled paving. At the heart of Mr Stork is a free-standing bronze pavilion, designed as an installation with radial tilted fins reminiscent of a classic wind-mill. The journey is also layered with a series of private tents where guests are invited to escape into a rural dreamscape. The exposed aggregate and tropical landscape reinforce the idea of an urban yet rustic al-fresco experience.

singapore.andaz.hyatt.com/en/hotel/home