• Covid-19 – click here for the latest updates from Forum Events & Media Group Ltd

Posts Tagged :

Pandemic

How luxury hospitality designers are adapting to the ‘new normal’

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
How luxury hospitality designers are adapting to the ‘new normal’

To cut through the noise, Hotel Designs has teamed up with J Public Relations to ask how designers Rosendale Design, Nicola Harding, Goddard Littlefair and David Collins Studio are adapting to meet new demands from travellers. Editor Hamish Kilburn writes…

One thing that has become apparent as we stand in the eye of the pandemic storm is that no one yet has all the answers. From the number of panel discussions I have hosted recently, I have learned that designers, architects and hoteliers are adapting daily to new developments in the Covid-19 crisis, which is somewhat impossible when designing hotels that will open years from now.

In one discussion that took place during lockdown, Michael Bonsor, Managing Director of Rosewood London, said: “The concept of hospitality, which is third largest employer in the UK, has stopped. We are now questioning how long this will last for.”

In another more recent discussion, Mark Bruce, Director at EPR, gave a raw reflection of the international hotel design landscape. He said: “The truthful answer to that is that our clients are all trying to figure that [the impact of Covid-19] out themselves, which is why this discussion is very timely,” he said. “On the luxury end, customers want things to be the same but with more space. On the more lifestyle and budget end of the scale, travellers want confidence.”

While we can predict that the pandemic will change consumers views on health and wellness, there is not one solution that fits all. One conclusion that is fixed however is that it will be more of a challenge to implement social distancing in luxury hotels than it will be to adapt lifestyle hotels for the new demands of modern travellers.

Ahead of putting many of these questions forward at Hotel Designs LIVE, we asked a handful of hospitality luxury designers how the pandemic will impact the industry from a design perspective.

Rosendale Design (Norma, The Stafford Hotel, Jason Atherton’s restaurants and more…) 

Image credit: The Stafford Hotel, London

“Terraces and outdoor spaces are now highly requested,” said Dale Atkinson, Founding Director of Rosendale Design. “This was once a ‘nice to have’ due to the unreliable weather in the UK, but now people feel safer eating and drinking outdoors. 

“One material that will see a resurgence is copper, this is due to its anti-bacterial properties; it has a very warm appearance and used correctly can look quite refined, so can be easily detailed into various spaces.

“Internally, we must look to divide group of tables into their own ‘pods’ whilst still maintaining the buzz that people want to be a part of. Booth seating works well.”

Nicola Harding & Co(The Mitre Hampton Court, The Rose at Deal, Beaverbrook & more)

Image credit: The Mitre Hampton Court

“Now, I’m even more determined to create somewhere intoxicating, a place that will transport people from the stress and sadness of the last few months,” said designer Nicole Harding. “I’m thinking about more mini-bar provisions, more comprehensive room service offerings – e.g. we are designing little hampers for cocktails/breakfast/movie nights.

Goddard Littlefair — Jo Littlefair & Martin Goddard, Co-Founders — (The Mayfair Townhouse, Villa Copenhagen, Hans’ Bar & Grill, Principal Hotels and more)

 

Image credit: The Mayfair Townhouse

“We may consider planning of spaces more,” says Jo Littlefair, Co-Founder of Goddard Littefair. “For example, so that pendants are positioned at heights that then don’t dictate where a table should sit, giving operators more flexibility to reposition furniture without looking out of place. 

“Spa within a spa is a whole conversation around whether a spa is hygienic — whether people will want to embrace them,” adds Martin Goddard, Co-Founder of Goddard Littlefair. “I think we feel that health is something people are going to really concentrate on, and therefore wellness, and spas, and the facilities that they can offer, all strengthen that appeal.”

David Collins Studio — Simon Rawlings, Creative Director — (Nobu Hotel Portland Square, The Carriage House and Tack Bar at Adare Manor, Gleneagles & more)

Image credit: Adare Manor

“I think that we are going to see social and cultural attitudes and behaviours changing, rather than changes to the physicality of restaurants,” explains Simon Rawlings, Creative Director at David Collins Studio. “The times and places that people visit restaurants will change, for example, if people are working from home, perhaps they will clock off earlier for an early-evening dinner to fall in line with local curfews. They will likely stay local, meaning that neighbourhood restaurants will flourish whereas city centre restaurants may not garner the footfall they need – which I think very sadly is what we are seeing happen at the moment here in London.”

If you are a designer, architect or hotelier and would like to have your say on how the industry should prepare for the ‘new normal’, you can tweet us @HotelDesigns.

Main image credit: The Mayfair Townhouse

In Conversation With: Mark Kelly, Partner at PLP Architecture

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: Mark Kelly, Partner at PLP Architecture

Looking ahead, past the pandemic, editor Hamish Kilburn sits down with Mark Kelly, Partner at PLP Architecture, to understand how to build a meaningful hotel landscape…

With the world the way it is at the moment, the conversation in the industry has steered sharply towards how architecture and design will be affected in the post-pandemic world.

PLP Architecture is a firm behind some of the world’s smartest and most sustainable buildings, which will soon include Pan Pacific London. Expected to be completed in 2021 – and already being described as an ‘architectural marvel’ – the project’s vision is to balance a design that is sensitive to the Asian heritage of the brand whilst creating an ultra-modern, timeless hotel and complex that challenges conventional architecture.

As a result of the firms sustainable mission, the building will shelter mix of 42 native wildflower and some sedum species populate levels 34 and 42 – 44, protruding above the structure’s rooftop, seeking to create a sense of continuity between the tower and the outdoor public spaces and gardens on the ground floor. 

Representing a number of firsts for London, such as being the first tower development in the City of London to harmoniously fuse private apartments with a luxury hotel, PLP Architecture’s collaborative approach with Yabu Pushelberg and developers UOL and Stanhope ensures the delivery of an integrated and seamless design at every level of building, helping to bring to life a bold, emblematic and creative new embodiment of urban expression for the capital. Most importantly, though, it has been built with tomorrow’s consumers and travellers in mind.

So how are architects evolving to meet the hefty demands of modern travellers and budget conscious clients in the post-pandemic world? I spoke to Mark Kelly, Partner at PLP Architecture, to find out.

Hamish Kilburn: How will coronavirus reshape architecture?

Mark Kelly: Architecture is an inherently flexible process – always evolving while constantly questioning and reinventing itself. As such, it is well placed to respond to the current and seemingly ever-changing Covid crisis and, for that matter, other current and future global concerns such as the climate emergency. Covid has specifically put extra focus on the health of the architectural spaces we inhabit – not just in the way they operate, but in the way they make occupants behave and feel.

We are already seeing a shift towards greater implementation of technology to reduce levels of contact. There is also now a greater recognition of the benefits of architecture enhancing a state of health and wellbeing – achieved through more natural lighting and ventilation, improved climate control, larger areas of personal space more robust and cleanable surfaces, increased sizes and more options for circulation, clearer signage and better management of wayfinding – as well as more pragmatic inclusions like well-designed and integrated places for washing / sanitising hands and select use of screens and shields where required in areas of frequent interaction.

“The current environment is a perfect opportunity for hotels to think creatively about ways to not just reconsider and reactivate their existing spaces.” – Mark Kelly, Partner, PLP Architecture.

HK: How should the hospitality industry prepare for post-pandemic work in terms of architecture and design?

MK: Though we are in very challenging times at the moment, we see opportunities for an exciting future across the industry – one that addresses the requirements of a post-pandemic world and also reinvents itself into a more dynamic, safe and inclusive environment for people to use and enjoy. Ultimately hospitality, as a service-based industry, has the goal of accommodating and providing comfort – not just for guests, although they are a clear priority – but for staff as well. Everyone involved has a right to feel safe and protected at all times.

Image caption: Final mock-up room inside Pan Pacific London

During the pandemic, we have seen some creative uses for hotels being implemented – including people using them as remote offices, exercise studios and other support for a newly mobile workforce. This has not only helped to counteract the problems associated with lower occupancy levels but started to address other issues that were present before the pandemic. The current environment is a perfect opportunity for hotels to think creatively about ways to not just reconsider and reactivate their existing spaces, but transform their business models to help further diversify and futureproof their assets.

We see a real need to shift towards the inclusion of more local target groups, with a new and expanded reliance on the local population to add authenticity and ensure year-round activation and use of hotels. The pandemic has provided, and in some cases necessitated, an opportunity for the industry to expand from a more straightforward offering of overnight accommodation with perhaps a restaurant and gymnasium, into a truly community-minded hub where locals, tourists and business men and women alike interact and intermingle in an environment that entices each.

Premium hospitality can remain a core function in hotels, but it will need to be flexible enough to adapt to take advantage of this exciting and beneficial adaptation into a Hospitality Integrated Business that brings together the workplace, wellness and placemaking.

HK: What kinds of spaces will we be willing to live, travel and work in now?

MK: Everyone’s goal is and will be to avoid contamination with the virus. As a whole, many of the types of spaces we will be willing to live, travel and work in already exist in limited quantities and going forward their designs will become more widespread through the adaptation and retrofitting of existing spaces and the creation of new ones.

Image caption: Render of the hotel entrance at Pan Pacific London

Density control is easier than ever now, and in hotels we believe that good design for the management of arrivals and departures in a reception space, for instance, can be easily integrated with new goals for sustainability to achieve environments that actively help prevent the spread of the virus and, ultimately, are healthier and more invigorating for everyone.

The inclusion of more natural light, better ventilation, clearer wayfinding, more generous sizing, and adaptable personal spaces – all things we as a practice have been incorporating into our designs for many years – have become crucial visual indicators of safety that allow us to feel comfortable and protected at our homes, in our places of work, and while moving around outside of both.

“No longer a futuristic dream, loop circulation systems with horizontal movement will help optimise people movement across levels.” – Mark Kelly, Partner, PLP Architecture.

HK: How can architecture mitigate pathogenic risks in an interconnected world?

MK: Architecture will play a crucial role in supporting our control of pathogenic risks in our increasingly globalised world. Natural ventilation and better air management, including the use of HEPA filters, for instance, are already recognised for their ability to reduce infection rates and virus spread. Easy-to-clean materials, such as high-pressure laminates and other smooth, anti-microbial surfaces, enabling efficient management of contagion mitigation measures.

Spatial use and organisation are also important, including the ways in which shared spaces (corridors, lounges, lobbies, dining areas) are activated. New developments in vertical circulation are poised to be a game-changer for taller structures in our cities. No longer a futuristic dream, loop circulation systems with horizontal movement will help optimise people movement across levels, spaces, and even buildings and reduce risk associated with unnecessary interaction.

Crucially, we believe that changes in architecture can be carried out subtly and effectively, preserving a sense of design identity and uniqueness, accommodating luxury and comfort, while embracing risk reduction and contagion prevention to ensure we can get back to close to what we define as our normal lives as possible.

Main image credit: PLP Architecture/Pan Pacific London

Hotel Designs LIVE: speakers & sessions announced

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Hotel Designs LIVE: speakers & sessions announced

Designers, architects, hoteliers and developers can attend Hotel Designs LIVE for free on October 13, 2020…

Following the success of our first ever virtual conference, Hotel Designs LIVE is back on October 13, complete with new sessions and speakers.

Hotel Designs LIVE was born out of the idea to keep the industry connected and the conversation flowing during the lockdown period following the spread of Covid-19 coronavirus. However, considering the noise the virtual conference created, the team at Hotel Designs have decided to return with part two. “The aim of this event on October 13 is to look beyond today’s pandemic in order to find real solutions for designers, hoteliers, architects and developers,” explains editor Hamish Kilburn who will host the virtual event. “To do this meaningfully, we have invited industry experts from around the world to sit on our virtual sofa.”

If you are designers, architect, hotelier or developer, click here to secure your complimentary seat in the audience.

On the agenda

 

In addition to the live interviews and panel discussions with handpicked industry experts – and to ensure that the event is aptly bridging the gap between hospitality suppliers and designers, architects, hoteliers and developers – the conference also included structured ‘PRODUCT WATCH’ pitches around each session, allowing suppliers the opportunity to pitch their products and services in a ‘live’ environment to the hospitality buyers that are tuned in.

If you are a designer, architect, hotelier  or developer and would like to secure your complimentary seats in the audience, click here.

If you are a supplier to the hotel design industry and would like to promote your latest product or services to the Hotel Designs LIVE audience, please contact Katy Phillips via email or call +44 (0)1992 374050.

Modern lobby area with clean air

How hotels can shelter wellbeing with cleaner air

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
How hotels can shelter wellbeing with cleaner air

With hospitality re-emerging in England, hotels would’ve spent the last few weeks closely reviewing and creating Covid-19 policies so that hygiene and wellbeing are a top priority. Victor Kristoffersson, Business Development Manager EMEA at Swedish air purifier brand Blueair, explains the wellbeing benefits of clean air…

Modern lobby area with clean air

Due to restrictions on travel we will see a rise in “staycations” as more people opt to holiday in the UK rather than travel abroad. Clean air will become more important than ever before when it comes to choosing where to stay. By investing in air purifiers, hotels will stay ahead of the competition and show guests they are going above and beyond to ensure their safety and wellbeing. While an air purifier is great for your health, it can also benefit your skin, productivity and sleep quality.

What you can’t see in the air can affect your health

Indoor air is made up of a concoction of particles including dust, pollen, allergens, bacteria and viruses. Breathing in this fine dust or PM2.5 (also known as fine particulate matter) can penetrate deep into the lungs and cause respiratory difficulties, heart and lung problems and a host of other diseases, studies show. Even if you have no other underlying health issues, studies show that improved air quality is conducive to better productivity, sleep quality and a general sense of wellbeing.

Air purifier by the bed

Image credit: Blueair Classic 200

Clean air improves quality of sleep

Clean air helps to promote deep sleep, and people who live in areas with higher levels of air pollution are 60 per cent more likely to sleep poorly than those living in areas with cleaner air, according to a YouGov survey looking into global perceptions of air quality, commissioned by Blueair. A 2017 study by The American Thoracic Society also found that people who live in areas with high air pollution are up to 60 per cent more likely to suffer a bad night’s sleep.

Since we spend the majority of our hotel stays asleep, hotels should consider the role air pollution plays in this – especially those located in cities where air pollution will be higher. Blueair’s air purifiers are Quiet Mark approved so will not distract from a good night’s sleep while they silently remove airborne particles in the bedroom.

Protect your skin from air pollution

Atmospheric factors such as air pollution have been implicated in premature skin aging – this includes air pollutants such as smog, ozone and particulate matter. Studies also show a correlation between higher levels of PM2.5 with an increased number of people suffering from skin problems such as pigment spots and wrinkles, hives and eczema.

As air pollution can be up to five times higher indoors than outside, the negative effects of air pollution are intensified inside. Blueair’s air purifiers are designed to remove harmful particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the air. VOCs can be anything from aerosol sprays to fumes from paint. Invest in an air purifier to remove the particulate matter and VOCs that are harmful to your skin.

Blueair’s recommendation is to place an air purifier in every guest room no matter what they pay, as well as throughout the hotel in areas such as in the lobby where people tend to gather. By doing this, you are providing the cleanest air possible for your guests – you may not be able to travel but you can bring air as clean as the Swedish archipelago to your hotel.

Blueair is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here

Main image credit: Page8 Hotel

OPINION: “Now is the time for your interiors to ‘WOW’

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
OPINION: “Now is the time for your interiors to ‘WOW’

For anyone or any business about to reopen to the world, here’s Interefurb’s Gary Crosbie ‘hints and tips’ checklist on how to make your interiors sparkle post-pandemic…

There have been some interesting and engaging articles on Linkedin and teleconferencing discussions about ‘out with the old, and in with the new’.

Two that spring to mind are the musings of Graeme Hinde of LFX Network and the likes of Sarah De Freitas (interior design) and Chris Chadwick (space transformation).  The common message appears to be, quite rightly, that as we start to release ourselves from this economic cloud, that has been coronavirus, not only will we be relieved – but for a real chance to succeed, there will need to be changes to practices.  These could be branding, interiors, sustainability, infectious protocol and cleanliness etc.  Well, here I just wanted to share some low-cost, quick fixes that operators in leisure, especially hotels, lodges, theme parks, hospitality, pubs and leisure operators might want to consider as we leave the ‘dark side’.

In previous articles and posts, we have spoken about safely closing and re-opening your hotel, bar or restaurant with the pandemic upon us. Now we are getting closer to re-engaging with our customers, owners need to be focused on presenting the very best version of their businesses and interiors. Some refer to it as ‘putting your best foot forward’.

Over the last few months, I have worked with several operators, who fall in to two definitive camps. 1) Those who are nervous about the future and have been so shocked by the disruption, that they are almost paralysed to make a decision; and 2) those who are relishing the opportunity to reopen and take advantage of the widely predicted boom in autumn staycations. Naturally, I’d like to share some case studies to the former, and work with both and the latter especially on the forward journey.

In business generally, we have either a product or service to sell. The hotel and hospitality sector has the added twist of selling both. In delivering great hospitality service, we need a great venue in which to attract guests over our threshold. First impressions really do count. Following the Covid closures ‘every penny is a prisoner’, we don’t all have a bottomless pit of money to spend on refurbishments, so where can we easily make a difference, without it costing a fortune?

One of the biggest barriers to carrying out any interiors refurbishment work is perceived to be loss of revenue whilst rooms are out of service. Maybe there are parallels or lessons that can be learned from this study: following 9/11, several canny operators took advantage of the quiet period and competitive prices in the supply chain, to bring their properties bang up to date and steal a lead on the competition when the market returned.

What, in my opinion is money wisely spent, and importantly how much will it cost? So some quick fixes to the interiors that might just resonate with you, starting outside with first impressions. Spruce up the area around the entrance. New door handles and entrance mat, decoration of the door and frame from around £200.

Signage – cleaned-up and make sure the lighting works. Again can be as little as £200, up to £500 dependent on specification. Little things, arguably money well spent without breaking the bank.

The interiors in the lobby – every guest spends time at your reception counter. It should therefore, be seen to be clean and smell nice. Create the ambience as they step in for the first time, or newcomers get that first experience. Fix any loose trims, refinish the worktop, don’t forget any shelving or storage units that are on view also. Make sure that all the lights have the same shade of bulbs. Take a look at the furniture, do you have tatty cushions or seating that can be spruced up with the additions of new ones. The same rules apply to restaurant and bar areas, especially with musty smells arising from long periods of not being used.

Image credit: Pixabay

Doors and frames – these normally get damaged with constant use and look tired very quickly it’s a very easy solution to make them look and feel more presentable with a repaint and change over of any damaged door handles.  I’m a stickler for ensuring that all door handles match, unless a varied characteristic of disparate rooms is part of the sell and branding ambience. From only £50 per door.

Quite often corridors and public areas have a dado rail.  The area below the dado can often be scuffed from baggage and trolley knocks.  Why not think, that rather than paint the whole corridor a lick of paint to sparkle below the dado makes a great improvement.  A little bit of that “WOW” which we encourage.

Image credit: Pixabay

Going in to the bedroom, your housekeeping is make or break, I’ve stayed in brand new properties which are badly cleaned and on the reverse I’ve stayed in older rooms where the house keeping is meticulous. Personally, I’d always choose content over style. So lets look at a typical bedroom and see what we can do to make some quick changes?

Image credit: Interefurb

Case goods – dressers and bedside tabletops take some hammer. Back painted glass tops are an easy fix and cost around £100. Whilst we are looking at case goods for around £5 each you can change the handles, and a couple of hours with some furniture stain will spruce up any minor scratches. So for around £200 you have another few years life span.

If you don’t want to go to the expense of a complete room redecoration, we have on many occasions, painted out or put a patterned paper on the headboard wall, this works out at less than £150. If you have wall lights maybe just change the shades, don’t forget matching bulb! And make sure the seam on the shade is hidden at the back.

There are many ways to add personality and style into an interior scheme, and what will work for one property will not work for others. If you would like to discuss your project with Interefurb’s team, please get in touch.

Interefurb is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here

Main image: Pixabay

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Visualising the future of F&B spaces in hotel design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Visualising the future of F&B spaces in hotel design

Hospitality will awake from the pandemic to face new challenges when it comes to designing F&B spaces. Hotel Designs turns to the CGI experts at North Made Studio to try and visualise the future of these public-facing outlets…

With the industry on a hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be some important future choices to make for hoteliers.

These choices will need to be made in all areas, but may become most stark within the F&B spaces of their hotels.

Until government guidelines are released, exactly how this sector of the hotel industry will proceed is a mystery. Dictating dates for reopening and the easing of certain measures will be crucial to define how the industry needs to adapt.

Should measures not be eased enough and distancing remain in place for the foreseeable future, questions will need to asked about profitably for certain spaces in a ‘socially-distanced’ world. Within the hotel sector F&B spaces may not be deemed a profitable use of available space.

From a visualisation perspective there may be more focus put on the finer details of a F&B space. Viewpoints centred around individual seating areas, up-selling the attributes of the table setting, rather then focusing on the overall aspect of the whole F&B interior area.

Some hoteliers my choose to get ahead of the game and move F&B spaces outdoors, allowing the potential for these spaces to open sooner. Over the last few years interior design for the luxury F&B sector has tried to bring the outdoors in, with Biophilia becoming a growing trend. This potential move of F&B spaces from indoor to outdoors would switch this around. Visually this could allow for outdoor F&B spaces to be depicted with extensive greenery, using the current trend and taking it beyond what was capable within an indoor environment. Or the alternative could happen, and a drive to bring the indoor aesthetic to outdoor spaces could become a trend.

The visualisation sector is geared up to work with both interior and exterior spaces, minimising any differentiation between the CG imagery produced in terms quality or realism.

Another possibly trend for F&B spaces within the hotel sector may be to move more than just the seating/eating areas outdoors. With the popularity of street food kiosks, van and trailers, There is the potential to move the complete catering service outside. Providing an innovative feature to the hotel experience that also opens up the F&B space to the general public, increasing potential custom.

Another great possibility of this is that the catering trailer/van can easily be switched out, to provide customers will different food and drink offerings on a regular basis. Incredible engaging visualisation can be produced for these kinds of external spaces. Creating the scene is just the start, population elements can be embedded within the scene to built a complete visual that includes food trailers, tables, chairs, different demographic of people. Finer details can also be added such as drinks on tables, litter bins. The more detailed the space is visualised, the more realistic and engaging it can be.

To further explore the future of F&B spaces in hotel design, we need to take things back to a pre-COVID stage. Many companies are simply waiting out the Coronavirus pandemic, putting projects on hold, in the hope that things will return to some semblance of normality. For these type of businesses the visual aspects of their F&B spaces will continue to follow current trends.

Experiential

Customers need to be enticed to utilise the F&B facilities within the hotel, creating engaging design with attractive styling is key. Sell these experiences during the early phases of a project with 360 degree viewpoints and visual reality tours can be a great way of boosting interest and getting designs approved.

Convenience

A core factor for F&B spaces in hotels is their convenience. Ensuring the spaces are easily accessible and positioned close to heavy footfall areas, will help to increase their usage. Positioning and ‘eye-catching’ features can be showcased via traditional still CG images, assisting the planing and development phases.

Variety

No two hotel customers are the same, with hotel spaces being used for both business and pleasure, the needs of specific customers will vary. Offering a variety of services with a F&B space will accommodate for ‘on the go’ customers as well as those customers who have more time to sit down and have a full meal. Showcase these innovative features via the use of cameo shot visuals.

Adaptability

The ability for a F&B space to be multi-purpose is vital. Catering for breakfast, lunch, snacks, dinner and drinks allows for the capture of more customers throughout the day.

With the core features of the space remaining the same, the F&B space can be created in CGI for visualisation purposes, and redressed several times to show the adaptability of the space.

Image credit: North Made Studio

Overall F&B spaces within hotels are facing some challenging times. But whatever happens in the future regarding reaction to COVID, these spaces will always be required  in some form. And the visualisation sector will be there to assist with what changes to the design ethos are needed. If new ways to communicate a space are required, the technological advancements in virtual reality could be the key to creating ongoing engagement in the future.

North Made Studio is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: North Made Studio

PRODUCT WATCH: USM’s take on ‘screen time’

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
PRODUCT WATCH: USM’s take on ‘screen time’

USM introduces protective attachment screens that are suitable for USM Modular Furniture

The hotel landscape has changed, and the design of the reception area needs to evolve to support this. Organisations are already investigating how they can make hotel spaces safer, effective, and efficient whist still adhering to government guidelines of social distancing.

One of the challenges that many hotels will have is how to ensure that their guests and employees feel protected at the reception area. Protective measures are essential so that employees feel safe and valued in these challenging times, whilst also reassuring guests.

Due to the spread of Covid-19, hygiene and protective measures must be treated with the highest priority. To protect employees and guests from mutual contact, devices are required that form a physical protective barrier against the transmission of bacteria and viruses through coughing, sneezing and human contact.

In keeping with the elegant clean design of USM Haller modular furniture there are different solution orientated variants with which you can quickly upgrade existing reception desks.

USM Modular Furniture is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: USM Modular Furniture

A textile brand is manufacturing non-medical masks during pandemic

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
A textile brand is manufacturing non-medical masks during pandemic

Hotel Designs learns more about how textile brand Backhausen is doing more than its bit, by designing non-medical masks, during the fight against the spread of COVID–19 coronavirus…

As COVID-19 started to spread around the globe, businesses in all industries started adjusting to the “new normal” by assessing core functions, as well as contributing and assisting positively to their communities.

Backhausen became conscious of the need for non-medical face masks in early March 2020, after the COVID–19 pandemic hit the company’s home country of Austria and other parts of the world. The company wanted to do something significant for its community – something that would take advantage of its expertise and craftsmanship and would benefit other people and businesses without forgetting about the environment and the planet.

“Our design and production teams adapted the manufacturing facilities at our textile mill in Hoheneich, in the heart of picturesque Waldviertel, to create a new quality fabric,” explains Maria Florencia Caruso from the brand. “We have carefully selected premium quality cotton yarn that is ÖKO-TEX certified and developed a 100 per cent cotton fabric that is sustainable and durable for reusable non-medical masks for everyday wear.”

Image credit: Backhausen

The company has designed a mask that provides comfort, protection and is aesthetically pleasing. The double overlap in the design allows the mask to be worn comfortably with glasses. The double tie bands allow the mask to be adjusted and fitted for wear.

Its aim has been to create a mask that is washable, comfortable, sustainable and customisable, from the beginning of its development. Backhausen’s mask is for individual customers, and the retail, hospitality and service industries. “We encourage and aspire to create a more comforting and assured return to the work environment and make this “new normal” less daunting and intimidating for everyone,” added Caruso. “At Backhausen, our strength and value has always been to provide flexibility, as a business and with our fabrics. The masks have been designed, focusing on their seamless incorporation into everyday business, with an option for customisation. The masks can be customised by colour and/or logo designs can be either embroidered or woven on the fabric.”

During these difficult times, Backhausen is donating €1 for every mask sold to the Austrian charity Lebenshilfe. This charitable organisation supports more than 11,000 people with pre-existing medical conditions and intellectual disabilities at 500 locations throughout Austria. The charity aspires to re-establish their independence after the COVID–19 pandemic, which has been so disruptive to their day-to-day lives. It will enable people with disabilities to select their own development opportunities in all phases and areas of life, reshape their lives independently, choose their support freely and take advantage of social offerings confidently and in line with their personal needs.

Please contact info@backhausen.com or call +43 2852 502 for the purchase of face masks, (minimum pack of five), for larger quantities and for customisation enquiries. From May 13, 2020, the non-medical grade masks will be also available for purchase at Backhausen’s Design Shop.

Backhausen is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Backhausen

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Coming back from COVID–19

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Coming back from COVID–19

As the UK lockdown measures show (slow) signs of relaxation, Hotel Designs checks back in with Gary Corsbie from Interefurb lists how hotels can come back from coronavirus…

In my previous article, we looked at the mothballing of your property, the checks and steps to take.The four main areas we looked at were weather, escape of water, pests and vermin and vandalism.

We are now seeing light at the end of the tunnel, and you want your business to emerge being the best version of itself. In addition, and arguably more importantly, your guests want to be assured that they are going to be staying in a safe and clean environment. The COVID–19 pandemic has made us very much more conscious of cleanliness and hygiene.

Duncan Stewart Operations Director for Town House Hotels says it is imperative that statutory health and safety requirements, are completely up-to-date and follows this up with the strongest message you can send to your guests is “You are the first to stay in this room” there is nothing that beats the smell of fresh paint.

But first let’s look at the basics and the Health and Safety items.

Basic safety items

The following should ideally be evaluated by property experts:

  • Structural integrity of the buildings – Visual checks, walk around both inside and out. Is there anything hanging off? Damp patches on ceilings, strange smells, new cracks or debris on the floors.
  • Electrical system damage- including high voltage, insulation, and power integrity- Fluke tests
  • Wastewater system – blocked drains, perhaps carry out a CCTV survey.  do this BEFORE you re-fill the water.
  • Water distribution system damage – Prior to re-fill if drained down.
  • Fire emergency systems operations – Service
  • Air conditioning and ventilation system – Service

Re-commission the property – prepare for opening

Step 1: Risk assessments, method statements and COSHH – all needs to be reviewed, in place and communicated with the team. Appropriate PPE needs to be made available. Open the windows and doors. Not only to check they work, but to help ventilate the building. Remove any items which have visible mold growth or damage. Inspect AC and ventilation system (motors, duct work, filters, insulation). Ensure you disinfect, and be prepared to repair and replace if necessary.

Wastewater – The last thing your guests want to find in their room is a blocked toilet. Sometimes, surprisingly, guests don’t take the same care in a hotel as they do at home. Without regular use drains become dry and debris becomes solid quickly, causing blockages when put back into use. If not emptied prior to shut down, kitchen grease traps and gullies need to be cleaned, fats solidify. Sink and Shower traps are another potential problem area, good practice is to physically clean them out. I know it sounds obvious but make sure the drains are clear before you start on the water system.

Water system (cold and hot water, sewer drainage, steam delivery, chillers, boilers) with special attention to shower heads. There is a British Standard BS8552:2012 and BSRIA BG29/2012 which sets out a full guide to the flushing, commissioning and treating of a system including water sampling.

If the system has been drained down, it is best practice to refill and commission by a qualified plumber and heating engineer, there will be leaks and air locks.

FF&E OS&E

Disinfect furniture with non-porous surfaces and salvage. Discard upholstered furniture, drapery, and mattresses if they have been under water or have mold growth or odour. Deep clean carpets upholstery and curtains. Vacuum the mattress and change any covers or protectors.

In my opinion a bathroom should be designed with no hidden traps or exposed pipework where muck can gather. A pet hate of mine is neglecting to clean the “triangle of doom”…the bit behind the door which is only exposed when you’re in the room with the door shut behind you. If you want to impress your guests, it should feel completely clean and new, perhaps fresh silicone? and don’t forget to clean the ventilation grille.

Back-of-house areas

Kitchens that haven’t been used for some time are a great attraction to pest and vermin. Most properties have a regime in place for regular cleaning. Take particular focus that drains and gullies are running freely. Pest Control traps should be checked and changed as appropriate.

Exhaust hood systems – Improve ventilation and reduce risks of kitchen fire by deep cleaning of the exhaust ducts, plenum, and roof exhaust fan. Kitchen equipment – Check electrical and gas safety checks have been carried out and maintenance is up to date.

External

Check that any external lighting is working, and signage is all in place.

General

Tell your insurers the hotel is back in operation, and check the WiFi and phone lines are working, not only for guest convenience but your own, when you take payments electronically. And finally, in light of the current situation, that extra care around infection control is prudent.  We have found installing omni sensors to self-check and remotely report on the requisite temperature parameters leaving one less thing for you and your staff to worry about. The HSE states: “It is important that water is not allowed to stagnate within the water system and so there should be careful management of properties left vacant for extended periods”.

Finishing touches – attention to detail.

One of the biggest barriers in carrying out a refurbishment is when you have been running at good occupancy there is reluctance to refurbish because of the loss of revenue. Now is the perfect time to carry out any works to make your property sparkle.

Now is an ideal time to make a few changes without the disturbance to your guests, have a think about some little jobs which can add a great deal to the guest experience?

Re-grout and silicone bathrooms. Decorate the entrance door put down a new mat. Replace door handles. Look at changing light bulbs so they are all the same colour- another of my pet hates…

Interefurb is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image: Interefurb

Architect designs hotel prototype of the wardrobe purifier

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Architect designs hotel prototype of the wardrobe purifier

A new battery-powered wardrobe purifier that is suitable for hotels has been designed by Carlo Ratti Associati, which uses ozone to help remove most micro-organisms, bacteria, and viruses from clothes…

It is anyone’s guess as to what the ‘new normal’ will be like after the COVID–19 pandemic has passed. And while it is, for some, too far-fetched to suggest that hotels will permanently introduce new hygiene measures, others believe that the pandemic has opened the hotel door to welcome in innovative new hygiene products.

One architect who has taken the lockdown as as an opportunity to create something purposeful is Carlo Ratti, who is the brains behind a new battery-powered wardrobe purifier.

Currently developed as a prototype, Pura-Case is a portable wardrobe purifier that uses ozone to remove most micro-organisms, bacteria, and viruses from clothes and fabric. The project aims to address the needs of the “new normal” – that is, the emerging changes brought forward to our domestic life by COVID-19. The product was commissioned by Scribit, the tech startup which recently converted part of its production line to respond to the current pandemic. Once a piece of garment is hung inside the case, an air purification system by ozone treatment cleans and deodorises the fabrics.

render of modern wardrobe

Image credit: Pura-Case/Scribit

Viruses or bacteria can survive on clothes for long periods. Ozone, a naturally-occurring triatomic form of oxygen (O3), is commonly used in the health and textile industry to sanitise fashion items, objects, and spaces. Pura-Case brings this technology safely into the household. It uses ozone to sterilise clothes while reducing the need for unnecessary washing and thus the consumption of water. Employed together with public health guidelines of the World Health Organisation, Pura-Case would help contribute to a more hygienic environment in the house.

“As the entire world adjusts to a new normal in terms of health and hygiene, Pura-Case aims to promote top sanitation standards in the key interface between us and the environment – clothes,” says Ratti. “Pura-Case is an alternative to large-sized devices currently being used in hospitals. It can play a vital role in the post-pandemic world next year as we regain our old social life.”

The product can be installed in a domestic setting and complete a cycle of purification in about one hour. Users can place the clothes inside the case, which accommodates up to four hangers and close it with an air-tight zipper. Using only a small amount of power, an imperceptible discharge will activate the ozone to penetrate the fabric and purify it while at the same time removing its odour. Once the cleaning cycle is completed, the ozone is reduced to oxygen through a natural decay process, ensuring the case is safe to open. The entire process can be started and controlled either via the LED-lit top panel or remotely through the Pura-Case mobile app.

Main image credit: Pura-Case/Scribit

In (Lockdown) Conversation With: Robert Whitfield, GM of The Dorchester

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In (Lockdown) Conversation With: Robert Whitfield, GM of The Dorchester

With the UK hospitality industry drastically adjusting its strategy during lockdown, Hotel Designs takes the opportunity to re-connect with one of the world’s most prestigious hotel brands, Dorchester Collection. Editor Hamish Kilburn speaks to Robert Whitfield, the brand’s Regional Director (UK) & General Manager of The Dorchester

For centuries, Mayfair’s leafy Park Lane has been the epicentre of London’s luxury hospitality scene. At present, though, the streets are bare and the extravagant entrances into opulent lobbies and extraordinary lifestyles remain (for the time being at least) sealed shut – and its not the kind of lock-in one is familiar with.

Among the five-star (currently empty) shells stretched along the east side of Hyde Park is The Dorchester, an iconic place that really does define its destination. Since its grand opening in 1931 – the same year the Empire State Building was completed in New York – the hotel, designed by architects William Curtis Green and Sir Owen Williams, has been setting new standards in premium hospitality.

89 years from when the famous doors first opened, the hotel stands majestically as ever having adapted sensitively to meet the demands of modern luxury travellers while also retaining its illustrious character. However, it, along with the rest of the hospitality industry, is facing unprecedented times, as the COVID–19 pandemic sends hospitality into paralysation.

To learn more about what the hotel is doing during lockdown, as well as celebrating its recent successes, I speak to the man at the helm, Robert Whitfield, who is the Regional Director UK of Dorchester Collection and General Manager of The Dorchester.

Hamish Kilburn: Robert, can you tell us a bit more about how The Dorchester is coping during the global health crisis, and how are you staying connected with your community?

Robert Whitfield: There is no denying that the global crisis has hit everyone hard, and sadly the hospitality industry is one of the worst to be affected. However, what it has re-affirmed for me is the true connection our team members have, keeping morale high and each other in good spirits. If you work in hospitality you have a natural instinct to want to be around people and make them feel at home, it’s in our DNA. So, we have channelled that passion into further helping our community.

Image caption: The living room inside the Harlequin at The Dorchester-

Image caption: The living room inside the Harlequin at The Dorchester

The Dorchester is very proud to have established an ongoing partnership with Manorfield Primary School in East London, working closely with pupils and staff on a number of initiatives since 2019, including helping raise funds to go towards developing their learning kitchen and donating furniture for areas of the school. As part of our continued partnership and as a response to the current global health crisis, we are providing chefs from The Dorchester’s staff restaurant to cook for the faculty and children of parents who are part of the essential workforce. We are also offering recipe classes to the pupils of the school to help keep them engaged and interested in cooking.

Every evening, The Dorchester illuminates in bright blue as a ‘thank you’ to the NHS and essential workers. Employees of The Dorchester, 45 Park Lane, and Coworth Park have pledged their support to the NHS and are assisting in the donation and distribution of food and necessary supplies to those impacted by COVID-19.

Image caption: During the COVID–19 pandemic, The Dorchester illuminates in bright blue each evening as a nod and ‘thank you’ to the NHS and essential workers

Executive chef Stefan Trepp and executive pastry chef Daniel Texter, along with chefs Jordan Champions and Sanjam Nagpal, handcrafted Easter Eggs for distribution amongst patients and staff of Great Ormond Street Hospital to help them celebrate the Easter weekend.

Dorchester Collection has also donated £25,000 on behalf of its UK hotels to Hospitality Action, a non-profit who supports hospitality workers who are in need and to help feed their families. Several colleagues have also signed up to the Golden Friends scheme via Hospitality Action and are making regular check-in calls to hospitality retirees in isolation due to the crisis.

Image caption: The living room inside The Dorchester's Terrace Penthouse

Image caption: The elegant living room that captures a unique London skyline vista inside The Dorchester’s Terrace Penthouse

HK: How do you stay connected to guests when they aren’t able to physically come to visit the hotels?

RW: Several of our team members have fostered great relationships with our guests over the years and are in regular contact with them via calls and email. We are also engaged with our most loyal guests to keep them in touch with news and updates from the hotel.

One of the best ways for us to stay connected to our guests after they have stayed with us is through our social media platforms. We are transferring our team’s talents online, showcasing our chef’s recipes and how-to’s, as-well-as expert tips from our sommelier or florist. This is a fun way for our social community to still see the smiley faces of some of our team members and hopefully learn a thing or two.

Quick-fire round:

HK: What is your favourite luxury item that you own?
RW:
My MGB sports car

HK: What was the last hotel you stayed in and what was the purpose of the trip?
RW:
The Pendry in San Diego meeting up with my kids for the Presidents Day Holiday weekend.

HK: In three words, can you describe the Dorchester Collection family?
RW:
Caring, passionate, fun-loving! 

HK: What superpower would make your job easier?
RW:
Teleporting.

HK: Why is Britain such a hub for luxury hotels?

RW: The hospitality sector contributes hugely to the British economy, with the hotel industry in particular a significant contributing factor. The growth of the hotel market over the last few years here, and indeed looking at what’s to come over the next couple of years, clearly demonstrates how important Britain, and London in particular, is a world class destination for leisure and business travellers.

“You also cannot deny that certain charm Britain has, which lends itself perfectly to hotels at the luxury end of the market.” – Robert Whitfield, Regional Director UK & General Manager of The Dorchester.

It makes sense, then, that some of the world’s most renowned luxury hotel brands are opening their doors in Britain. You also cannot deny that certain charm Britain has, which lends itself perfectly to hotels at the luxury end of the market – travellers are drawn to the rich history and heritage of a quintessentially British experience. Combine that with the fact that Britain occupies a vibrant position on the world stage and it’s a winning destination for the luxury traveller.

It is not just London at the forefront of luxury hospitality; across the country you have the best hotels in the world. Coworth Park in Ascot celebrates its 10 year anniversary this year and from the moment it opened became one of the world’s best country house hotels and remains at the top a decade later.

HK: How does The Dorchester differentiate luxury on the London hotel scene?

RW: There are many hotels that claim to provide the best in luxury, whether it’s the biggest pool, or most expensive wine list, but for The Dorchester our definition of luxury is: service. How do you feel when you come to stay with us? How can we go above and beyond what you were expecting? That is what is most important, everything else is just a given, and for us to be world leaders in service really is a testament our talented people.

HK: How has luxury changed since you started in hospitality?

RW: The biggest change has to be the level of competition, especially in London where all the global luxury players want to have a presence. And that’s a good thing. It has kept London’s hospitality scene at the top of its game.

Luxury used to be about the physical elements of a hotel. The décor, the facilities and this has evolved away from the material to the experiential. Personalised service and recognition is more valued. The guest is also more sophisticated and knowledgeable. Search engines allow access to so much information our team members need to stay up to date and have an intimate knowledge of the very best experiences that might appeal to our guests.

We look for ways to surprise and delight our guests with small and meaningful touches. Often, it is the small things that make all the difference.

“Before I started my role at Dorchester Collection I spent ten years at the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai in Hawaii, and prior to this I worked for the company in California and Nevis in the Caribbean.” – Robert Whitfield, Regional Director UK & General Manager of The Dorchester.

HK: How has travel enriched your life and made you into the hotelier you are today?

RW: I have been lucky enough to work in some of the most beautiful places in the world. Before I started my role at Dorchester Collection I spent ten years at the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai in Hawaii, and prior to this I worked for the company in California and Nevis in the Caribbean. Having that experience, learning how other countries approach service and operate day-to-day, has really helped inform my management style here in London. I was able to travel to a wide variety of locations from Bora Bora, to Bali, to Jackson Hole in Wyoming to the snowy peaks of Whistler.

I have developed an appreciation for different cultures and for diversity and the strength that this can bring to a business. It has also told me that service is about humility and caring for others. I am so proud to have worked with some extraordinary people who have shaped my career and taught me so much. Many lessons have come from my bosses, but also from the employees I have worked with.

HK: There has been a huge buzz around the re-launch of The Grill at The Dorchester. Why did you choose to relaunch?

RW: The Grill has been an integral part of The Dorchester since the opening in 1931, in order to keep the restaurant busy you need to ensure its identity and offering is relevant to your guests. We appointed Tom Booton, who happens to be our youngest ever head chef of The Grill, to lead the next chapter of the restaurant, supported by a fantastic team of fresh talent. The idea of creating an experience that would juxtaposition away from people’s  more traditional expectations of The Grill at The Dorchester was exciting and Tom was the perfect catalyst that made this come to life.

Image caption: Head chef of The Grill, Tom Booton and a few of his  special dishes on the new menu

Our aim was to create a more relaxed dining experience for guests through the development of new menus and a series of interior updates. The most prominent interior change is our statement ‘Pudding Bar’, which adds an element of theatre to the dining experience. Guests are invited to dine here for their final course to watch the pastry chefs in action.

HK: How will the newly adapted restaurant embrace the legacy of the 89-year-old hotel while also reflect the future of luxury F&B offerings?

RW: Our rich past matched with our ability to embrace ‘the new’ is deeply rooted in The Dorchester’s culture, and our guests are charmed by that.

At its core, The Dorchester has always been a hotel to celebrate. The new chapter of The Grill is no exception, and Tom’s dishes alone are a reason to come back to visit. Original features of the restaurant have remained, but new elements such as The Grill Bar, with a cocktail menu by award winning senior bartender Lucia Montanelli, and the Pudding Bar concept offer something new.

HK: You have, for the first time, a physical florist boutique within the hotel. Can you tell us more about this project?

RW: The Dorchester has become world-famous for its floral arrangements, all to the credit of our in-house designer florist Philip Hammond and his fantastic team. It is also a place of celebration. Guests come to celebrate, birthdays, anniversaries and all kinds of milestone moments in their lives. Flowers are a wonderful sign of celebration. We wanted to create a physical space where guests and visitors to the hotel could buy flowers and we found the perfect spot at the entrance to The Promenade.

Image caption: Philip Hammond, the Florist at The Dorchester

Image caption: Philip Hammond, the Florist at The Dorchester

We coincided the boutique opening with the launch of ‘The Dorchester Rose’, which is a really beautiful new variety of rose. The rose took seven years to make and was created by Meijer Roses, a family company with a long tradition of creating the highest quality roses who selected The Dorchester to carry the name of this new variety. The rose now fills the entirety of The Promenade and the colour is perfect to complement the interior tones of The Dorchester.

Main image credit: Dorchester Collection

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Designing fitness spaces after the pandemic

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Designing fitness spaces after the pandemic

Hotel Designs continues putting ‘Spas’ under the spotlight by asking Flair Studio how the design of fitness spaces will change post-pandemic…

The fitness industry has been badly hit as a result of the COVID–19 spread and in the current situation it is exploring innovative ways to save itself from being irrelevant through online apps and zoom sessions from home.

And while training equipment sales for the private consumer are booming, gym clubs, fitness and wellness studios are all going to remain closed for the foreseeable future.

In fact, going to a club and exercise is no longer safe for obvious reasons as people couldn’t use the same equipment unless everything is wiped out, the air conditioning is turned off and some distancing measures are put in place.

The current situation could give designers the opportunity to reimagine the fitness experience and the spaces in which it will take place after the Virus has become more contained and manageable. Obviously, exceptional hygiene measures have to be put in place and paired with air treatment systems which favour the usage of outside air ventilation and the increase of air exhaust.

empty fitness studio

Image credit: Pixabay

At the beginning, design opportunities will probably start from smaller, independent and community integrated boutique fitness centres rather than the larger clubs. This is also due to most of the large clubs being usually located into dark basements wit forced air systems and artificial lights, something that was well epitomised by Simon Rawlings, creative director at David Collins Studio, even before the lockdown: “I want somewhere that feels inspiring,” he explained. “I don’t want to work out somewhere that’s like a nightclub but spend time somewhere that’s calming. I like daylight – it soothes my brain.”

Another important design aspect will be to bring in residential elements into these spaces not only to smooth the transition and create a sense of comfort but also to provide wellness experiences that the users can feel their own. As personal training and one-to-one sessions will be probably more common during the short term, the environment will focus more on authenticity, easiness, intimacy and understatement, rather than on brand awareness and bold, theatrical features.

I am sure people will go back to exercise together at some point as doing the same work out from your living room can become a bit boring and the weather to exercise in the park can be unpredictable.  I am also confident that initially, smaller boutique wellness and fitness centres which are more integrated within their communities will be able to regain business sooner by reconnecting with their customers and delivering a more comforting ant authentic experience.

Flair Studio is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Pixabay

Virtual roundtable’s response: “Personal and social hygiene awareness has increased exponentially”

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Virtual roundtable’s response: “Personal and social hygiene awareness has increased exponentially”

Following the expert opinions being amplified in Hotel Designs’ first ever virtual roundtable, exploring the long-term impact of COVID–19 to the hospitality and design industry, Room To Breathe shares its response from a hygiene perspective…

The virtual roundtable discussion on the future of the hospitality industry after the COVID–19 pandemic raised several serious questions and issues and made us think about what is on the horizon.

Few markets have felt the full force of this global pandemic more than the hospitality sector; it has decimated trade, scattered the labour force and threatened the very existence of the supply chain. It has also had a huge effect on working practices and will have for many years to come.

“Personal and social hygiene awareness has increased exponentially, with a growing scepticism of what and what is not clean.”

Michael Bonsor, the Managing Director of Rosewood London, explained it perfectly: “This pandemic will reset how we think about travel and will require us to confront problems such as mass tourism and over tourism in many destinations around the world.” Never before have travellers, holiday makers and businesspeople been faced with such unpredictable circumstances making it difficult for them to seek satisfaction and reassurance that their wellbeing is being addressed. Personal and social hygiene awareness has increased exponentially, with a growing scepticism of what and what is not clean.

Whether we are at our workplace, attending leisure facilities or travelling for business or pleasure, we all now have a heightened awareness of how we interact and will now expect and demand a higher level of service from Providers that takes cognisance of the perceived risks as a result of this. Capturing this feeling of assured safety every time must be the focal point for customer satisfaction.

standard hotel room

Image credit: Pixabay

When it comes to the future of public spaces and their design, we must understand the effects of Social Distancing and how much it has affected the perceptions of consumers. Fiona Thomson said: “Sustainability is such an important topic and it should be engrained into mindsets enough now that there is no reason for it to be shelved, especially when it comes to designing projects.”

The hospitality sector must do something to insulate itself from the aftershock of COVID–19 and prepare for the inevitable increase in customer fears and ultimately demands for their wellbeing. Is carrying out the same cleaning protocols more frequently by an already stretched Housekeeping department going to provide the reassurance required? In a word, no. By taking steps to show commitment to your customers health is now, for hoteliers, more than ever, of paramount importance.

Imagine the cost of a deep clean between every guest. This is neither practical nor affordable. A new approach to a new problem must be the way forward. It needs to address the worries and concerns of your customers but must, just as importantly, be cost effective.

Discussing sustainably and it’s future, Bonsor highlighted: “Respecting the world around us has never been so important.” An important element is the very need of removing harsh chemicals and disinfectants from the housekeeping protocol and procure alternative solutions that are safer, more sustainable and environmentally friendly.

“Future-proofing your customers environment is more that just fogging.”

After all the dust settles from COVID19, will there be any winners in the hospitality sector? Not sure that the word ‘winners’ is appropriate, but those that look into the future wishes of their customers, their health and their wellness will be the ones who will see the benefits. Bonsor went on to mention that they were engaging with a company that fogs large areas of public spaces. He suggested that: “The fogging treatment protects the area for up to 30 days. This product lands on surfaces and protects them.” This is very true, to be honest, and is the only the first stage. There are other key factors that need to be considered, especially the training aspect for Housekeeping staff. Future-proofing your customers environment is more that just fogging.

At Room to Breathe UK our system provides ongoing, continual, long term management of viruses, bacteria, moulds, fungi, VOC’s and allergens. Systems that offer the ’28 day’ efficacy tend to be electrostatic spaying of a chemical solution. This will be wiped away when the surface is cleaned! Whereas our antimicrobial coating is permanently bonded and produces a mechanical kill which again avoids the use of toxins, poisons or leaching effect chemicals.

man steaming curtains

Image credit: Room To Breathe

Our comprehensive four-step process covers every aspect of deep cleaning but most importantly it looks at prevention which is key in future-proofing all environments for your customers.

The first step involves an initial industrial air purge followed by a combination of steam cleaning above 40℃, ultra-low-penetration air (UPLA) vacuuming and the application of our unique decontamination fluid which is deadly to pathogens (but is safe to all higher living organisms) is fogged into the area ensuring every surface coated. Additionally, by using innovative UV technology we can rid mattresses, pillows and soft furnishings of undesirable micro-organisms within seconds.

Step Two is where our antimicrobial coating “BioTouch”, will be is applied. The BioTouch formula bonds to a clean surface and when viruses and bacteria land on the protected surface, the cellular structure is ruptured (not poisoned) and becomes defunct. The only way BioTouch can be removed is by it being chipped off. Where there is a risk of this, on door handles, light switches for example, we can easily reapply to maintain the coatings efficiency.

When it comes to bedding and soft furnishings the third step of our process involves using our own unique formula, Protext solution provides a layer of invisible protection which permanently interrupts the life cycle of dust mites and bed bugs. Our method avoids the use of toxins so whilst lethal to bugs and mites does not pose a risk to the client. This is also applied to all fabrics and soft furnishings.

For full prevention and reassurance, we install filterless air signifiers providing the final level of protection, this final stage secures continuous air sanification. Using technology originally developed by NASA, our sanifiers seek out contaminants and pathogens within the air and on surfaces and neutralise them.

By applying this four-step process, we not only eradicate 99.99 per cent of viruses and bacteria, we also provide a continuous level of protection in between our deep clean processes.

On completion certification is provided and displayed either outside or within the room to provide that peace of mind to Customers and employees alike. A Room Information Pack is provided for guests to simply explain the RTB system, providing that peace of mind.

In order to maintain the certification, Steps One and Two are carried out every four months in accordance with our terms & conditions. On-site training is also provided to Housekeeping staff in order to ensure the efficacy of the RTB system is maintained. This is no more onerous to staff and in fact will simplify their cleaning protocols.

Room To Breathe is one of Hotel Designs’ recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Room To Breathe

Rosewood launches relief to support communities during pandemic

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Rosewood launches relief to support communities during pandemic

The luxury hotel group has launched Rosewood Raise, a relief initiative to support associates and communities that have been affected by COVID–19…

Rosewood Hotel Group has launched Rosewood Raise, a comprehensive relief initiative developed in support of the Group’s associates who have been impacted by the COVID-19, as well as the communities in which the Group operates.

Rooted on the foundation of Relationship Hospitality, a belief that true hospitality springs from the nurturing and building of strong and lasting relationships with associates, guests, partners and communities, Rosewood Hotel Group has always recognised and revered the power of people in creating the exceptional experiences that drive the industry. Developed in dedication to these very individuals that have demonstrated an unwavering commitment to the Group’s hotels and destinations, Rosewood Raise supports an associate relief fund and community-focused efforts, including donated hotel rooms and meal preparation and supplies for essential workers.

Managed by the Emergency Assistance Foundation, Inc., a 501c(3) charity created to design and operate multiple employer-sponsored disaster relief and employee hardship funds, the Rosewood Raise Relief Fund aims to assist staff in corporate offices and managed hotels across its three brands – Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, New World Hotels & Resorts, KHOS. The fund will support associates whose jobs were amongst the first and most affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, prioritising those facing financial difficulties due to health-related needs, as well as local communities that have been especially affected by the pandemic. Upon the containment of the current crisis, the relief fund will continue to support the Group’s associates against future adversities and hardships.

In its first two weeks since formation, the fund has received initial pledges of close to USD $2 million from Rosewood Hotel Group’s corporate executives and associates, including salary contributions and a commitment from the company to match all employees cash contributions to the fund.

“We wish to stand in solidarity and with gratitude for our associates, and in support of the local communities that are so deeply affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.” – Sonia Cheng, chief executive officer of Rosewood Hotel Group.

On the property level, several of the Group’s hotels and resorts are supporting the local communities in which they operate, engaging in Rosewood Raise efforts across the globe. Among the first properties in the portfolio to be affected by COVID-19, New World Hotels & Resorts’ hotels in Wuhan and Guiyang saluted their cities’ medical workers by providing complimentary accommodations. Across the ultra-luxury Rosewood Hotels & Resorts brand, many properties throughout Asia Pacific, Europe and North America are supplying necessities and meals to medical associates, first responders and area hospitals, as well as to local organisations and charities aimed at assisting families and individuals in need. Both Rosewood Bangkok (Bangkok, Thailand) and Rosewood Miramar Beach (Montecito, USA) have created Rosewood on the Move food delivery services to offer complimentary comfort meals to frontline workers in the hotels’ respective regions. Rosewood Miramar Beach, specifically, has already served over 1,500 meals to essential personnel throughout Santa Barbara, CA, ranging from police officers and fire fighters to waste handlers and grocery store attendants. Additional properties preparing meals for key workers at their local hospitals include Rosewood London (London, UK), Rosewood Hong Kong (Hong Kong, SAR), and Rosewood Abu Dhabi (Abu Dhabi, UAE).

“I have always believed that people are the beating heart of the hospitality industry,” said Sonia Cheng, chief executive officer of Rosewood Hotel Group. “Through Rosewood Raise, we wish to stand in solidarity and with gratitude for our associates, and in support of the local communities that are so deeply affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our hope is that through this initiative we can provide assistance to our associates and communities who are facing serious hardship and let them know their Rosewood family is here to support them through this unprecedented time.”

Through the launch of Rosewood Raise, Rosewood Hotel Group is committed to continuing to identify and execute future opportunities to support its associates and the global community through multi-layered fundraising activities and community service projects in the years ahead.

To read Hotel Designs’ exclusive virtual roundtable on how the pandemic will impact the industry, which includes comments from Rosewood London’s Managing Director, Michael Bonsor, click here.

Main image credit: Rosewood Hotel Group

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: The meaning of hospitality in a hostile world?

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: The meaning of hospitality in a hostile world?

Designer Peter Mance, who the director of MAAPS Design and Architecture, takes a thorough look at why design in hospitality will change post-pandemic… 

Me: “Alexa, define ‘hospitality’.”
Alexa:The definition of hospitality is the friendly and generous reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers.”

A new viral guest is in our midst, and I’m wondering how we address this invisible and disruptive reality. COVID–19, and the attendant fear it has spawned, will not disappear easily. A whole new level of trust and confidence will be necessary for hotel owners, operators, developers and their guests. What will we need to do to remove hostility from hospitality?

For the design community, some of these issues raised will be the very antithesis of the methods we have used to design in the past. Those carefully nurtured public spaces of “blurred permeability”, the vibrant blending of social and co-working use will need to be “de-tuned” for a while.

In the absence of government directives and guidance, what should we be considering as our new rules? Below, I’m going to venture some thoughts and questions of my own in order to understand how we may behave when we are sanctioned to open our doors and welcome guests again.

The arrival experience

  • Will our default still be a warm greeting and our guests simply assume “business as usual” or will new modes of caution and protocol be required?
  • Will travel and booking documents be sent ahead to demonstrate “cleared to travel” status?
  • Will some type of Orwellian biological implant, electronic tag or a Smartphone App be adopted as the standard to signal a guest’s viral status on arrival?
  • Does the near-future hotel have to provide an air-locked refuge with Hazmat suits discarded at the door; or perhaps a quick sanitising spritz at the entrance and handwashing while masked attendants carrying out temperature scans while verifying travel papers?
  • What happens and what protocols are required if the arriving guest presents with a temperature?
  • Do we need to establish a quarantine zone within the hotel or have an agreement in place with Hotel “Nightingale” for any self-isolating travellers?
  • Should we provide our guests with new gloves, new masks, wipes and protective clothing each time they enter the hotel?
  • How does any “health-check” equipment integrate with an elegant lobby, and do we invest this with the hospitality message we wish to convey?
  • How do we reassure our guests, and will the previous tropes/conventions of a welcome cocktail, chocolates in the room, or warm cookies be deemed enough?
  • And perhaps finally, we will have the opportunity to design sexy and attractive hand sanitiser dispenser we’ve wanted to see.
Image caption: CQ Gracechurch St - Club Living Room 2

Image caption: Living Room inside Club Quarters Hotel, San Francisco

In the same way that past acts of terrorism brought hastily improvised metal detectors and bag checks to the front door, the reality of the post-pandemic world will necessitate some type of intervention to ensure that staff, guests and reputations can be protected.

Hopefully, these will not be the ugly, ad-hoc installations, which were imposed for sound security reasons, that outwardly signal exclusion and fear.

Hotels have prided themselves on being sanctuaries for travellers. With great and inspired design they, have carefully curated the ambience, experience and style of hospitality they offer. The industry has made huge strides to dissolve boundaries and transform hotels into locally connected, bustling hubs of social engagement.

Image caption: The lobby, inside Club Quarters Hotel, San Francisco

Image caption: The lobby, inside Club Quarters Hotel, San Francisco

Guest check-in and the lobby

For the road-weary business traveller, the previous advances of self-check-in and the keyless mobile app independence will be shunned. The traveller will not be allowed to pass unobtrusively to their guestrooms. My suspicion is that not only the hotel operator, but also our various government agencies, will wish to know all guest movements and interactions. It will be in the interest of everyone to be much more inquisitive and intrusive.  So, what will be necessary for the new digital/human interface during check-in?

Within hotel lobbies, I can envisage that solo seats will enjoy a welcome return. And with greater social distance perhaps, there is an up-side in that we will have the mental space and aural stillness, to again reconnect with our inner landscapes. It will be a chance to appreciate our surrounding, their design and to reflect more on the purpose for travel – whether for business or pleasure.

Corridor and guestrooms

  • Will the superficial re-selection of fabrics for inherent biological resistance, non-porous surfaces, and disinfectant fogging be all that is required to purge and protect guests?
  • Do we now have to designate a set of rooms converted into daily isolation suites?
  • What are our new questions to the MEP consultants?
  • What level of air filtration and recirculation will be acceptable in our viral future? Particularly pertinent considering the lessons learned from recent Cruise ship experience.
  • What hygiene improvements must we demonstrate in our already high standard of room cleaning?
  • Will we come value and prioritise the efficient and simplicity of layout as a virtue in guest rooms design?
  • Will a curfew be imposed with guests confirmed to rooms to ensure social distancing?
  • How will room service adapt, and will we now demand active in-room monitoring of our guests?
  • Will the nightly turn-down service include taking our guests temperature and fulfil other health-check procedures?
  • Will we designating long-stay quarantine rooms and what provision for beside equipment, room evacuation, or health care staff may be required>
  • How will two-metre distancing be implemented within our typical corridors? Perhaps as simple as adding a passing space, as we seen in narrow country lanes.
  • What will be our new lift/elevator etiquette?
Image caption: Guestroom inside The Jewel Hotel New York

Image caption: Guestroom inside The Jewel Hotel New York

In the short term I suspect we will all be looking to learn a lot from our colleagues in Health Care. Adopting many of their routine approaches to hygiene as our new standard. We will be looking at the selection of fabrics and surfaces, the use of inherent micro-bacterial defences, improved air filtration and a great deal more observation of guest’s welfare.

“I strongly believe that good design can help in re-establishing the inherent trust and meaning expressed by the word “hospitality”.” – Peter Mance, Director, MAAPS Design and Architecture.

My sense is that the returning traveller will be acutely sensitive to their environment and will appreciate the safe refuge and assurance which hotels can provide. We can all readily recognise that our reasons for travel, for whatever purpose, has the potential to be disproportionately risky, both for us as individuals and the hotels. While we can be certain that our inveterate desire to travel will return, our guests will be highly concerned for their own wellbeing, as well as conscientious on behalf of their colleagues, family, friends and wider communities.

Guests will want to be assured that the behaviours and operations of hotels are confident, safe, detailed and robust. Trust will be paramount for all brands. I strongly believe that good design can help in re-establishing the inherent trust and meaning expressed by the word “hospitality”. Gently at first, cautiously breaking down barriers and carefully communicating to our guests that we have their welfare at our heart and the right precautions and procedures in place.

We can reasonably anticipate as a business and community that we’ll successfully adapt. The ingenuity of humankind a huge advantage, and it responds so well to adversity. We’ll discover the blessings and opportunities that this global reset will offer – perhaps an even more resonate connection with our local communities.

We will continue to appreciate the attentive care and hospitality offered by hotels, and we will continue to travel to experience the wonders of our planet. Business will be done, and the value of face-to-face encounters will remain important. We instinctively thrive on curiosity and trust and will acutely appreciate the value of such interactions.

Design will continue to act as an intrinsic intermediary link between the traveller and host, helping set the scene to convey the values and brand essence of our hotels.

Our work as designers remains primarily concerned with guest interaction and experience. Underscored, as always, with a thorough understanding of the hotels operational, functional and experiential ethos. Added to this will be the new concerns of hygiene, security and protection.

For newly commissioned and refurbished hotels, we can expect that thoughtful and embedded demonstrations of sustainability along with a deep, genuine connection to the local community will be implicit.

For all the gloom and fear this pandemic has instilled, our present physical reality remains remarkably familiar. Ironically, our natural environment appears to be thriving and enjoying this imposed worldwide pause. Once again skies are clear, stars sparkle, and nature gently and effortlessly reasserts itself.

Within this present hostile environment, our hospitality instincts remain generous and hospitable. We are an ingenious and resourceful community. We will adapt and we will prevail.

MAAPS Design and Archtiecture is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image caption: Sketch by Peter Mance derived from the courtyard entrance canopy of Trump’s Washington DC hotel, which remains open as it is “designated as an essential business” |
Main image credit: MAAPS Design and
Architecture

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Mothballing your property during the pandemic

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Mothballing your property during the pandemic

With the current slump in trade, operators are being forced to close sections of their properties or indeed whole buildings. Hotel Designs asks Interior Refurbishment Contractor, Interefurb, how hotels can best utilise this quiet spell during the pandemic. Gary Crosbie explains…

The COVID–19 pandemic continues to halt the hotel design and hospitality industry. While some properties are being transformed into temporary accommodation for the sick, homeless and medical workers, other buildings lie bare.

If it’s any conciliation, we have been in a similar situation before. In 2001, the Foot and Mouth outbreak and the wake of 9/11 left the industry on its knees. After the lull of activity and an anxious period for investors and operators, the market recovered. Here are some tips that we learned during that time. 

One of the largest barriers when carrying out refurbishment is the loss of revenue whilst rooms and areas are out of action. But back then, several of our clients took advantage of quiet and empty properties and carried out their refurbishment and maintenance works, stealing a lead on the competition when business returned. Which it will.

Plan ahead

How long  are you expecting the building to be unoccupied for? Do you have any special features that require special protection? The most important threats to a vacant building are:

  • Weather – our weather patterns currently are unpredictable and extreme. If building elements are not properly secured, the high winds may damage many building elements and leave others open to further damage. Likewise, heavy rains may cause flooding on the lower levels of the building and water penetration in other unsecured areas.  
  • Escape of water – Escape of water and moisture will cause the decay of materials, leading to wood rot, growth of mold and fungi, and provide a hospitable environment for insects.  Water can gain direct access to the building through windows, doors, roof openings, damaged mortar joints, blocked gutters and condensation caused by temperature and humidity shifts within the building.
  • Pests and Vermin – When birds, bugs, and rodents make your vacant building their home, it increases the likelihood of structural damage and compromises the integrity of decorative elements.  New openings in the building may be made by these vermin.  Birds’ nests can be a fire hazard and their droppings, a disease threat.  Rodents may chew on the building’s wiring, and insects may bore into wood structural supports. Old food left in rooms and dare I say staff accommodation
  • Vandalism – Caused when local opportunists force entry, any opening then allows the direct entry of vermin, wind, and water.  Vandals may also damage the interior or start fires in the building. 

A well a thought-through and implemented plan will help eliminate disaster, especially whilst there is nobody around to regularly monitor and will also make the recommissioning easier.

Create a checklist

A simple checklist can help to prevent many of these conditions from exacting their toll on your investment: 

  • Roof – Repair all leaks. Ensure all flashing is secure, and gutters run freely.
  • Ventilation – A securely ventilated building prevents the damage that can be caused by condensation. Ventilate the building so that air enters at ground level and leaves at the attic level. 
  • Windows and doors – Entry points, such as windows and doors, should be secured to prevent damage and entry from vandals. Remove any debris, such as loose bricks, that could be thrown at the building to provide entry. 
  • Plumbing and heating – Plumbing in an unheated building should be protected by shutting off the water supply and draining the pipes, contact your insurer regarding their requirements for and sprinkler systems.  Seal WC lids to prevent accidental use.
  • Finishes and furniture – If safe storage can be provided elsewhere, it may be prudent to remove and store valuable items. Photograph the items in their original location before removal.
  • Notifications – notify your insurers, alarm monitoring companies and appropriate local authorities of the vacant building, consider providing keys to the police and Fire and Rescue.

Interefurb is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Edinburgh hotel donates 1,000 free nights to medical staff during pandemic

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Edinburgh hotel donates 1,000 free nights to medical staff during pandemic

Workers of the pandemic frontline in Edinburgh have booked 1,000 free nights and meals at the Best Western hotel, Ten Hill Place… 

Owned by The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RSCEd), Ten Hill Place in Edinburgh has donated 1,000 of its rooms to NHS medical workers during the COVID–19 pandemic.

Located three miles from the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh and less than a mile from the Royal Hospital for Sick Children, the hotel is providing much-needed nearby accommodation and meals for key workers tackling the pandemic.

This has proven invaluable to guests facing tiring commutes between expanding shifts or to help workers isolating from vulnerable family members.

“The response to our decision to accommodate medical and clinical workers has been astounding, and we want to encourage more staff who are working at the city’s hospitals to get in touch with us to find out how we can help support them,” said Scott Mitchell, Managing Director at Surgeons Quarter. “It’s a privilege to play our part in helping make the lives of medical workers a little easier during one of the most difficult times the country has faced.”

The Best Western Ten Hill Place has 129 guestrooms available for hospital staff, as well as packed continental breakfasts and complementary evening meals courtesy of its award-winning catering team.

Frontline workers have praised the hotel for its continued support during the pandemic.

A Tripadvisor user posted: “I cannot explain how grateful I am to them. All social distancing respected and we are well looked after – not to have worries about cooking or cleaning plus a calm comfortable night’s sleep is great. This will be my top hotel in Edinburgh forever.”

Professor Michael Griffin, President of the RSCEd and one of the UK’s leading surgeons, said: “We’ve heard and seen directly from our colleagues how severe the impact COVID-19 is on our health service.

“Having accommodation near hospitals to rest and recover from allows our colleagues to be looked after, at a time when they need the most support. We’re incredibly proud of the team at Surgeons Quarter and their invaluable efforts to help the health service.”

As well as the commitment to accommodate staff, the RCSEd has been engaging with interim Chief Medical Officer Dr. Gregor Smith to declare its willingness to temporarily convert the hotel, should hospitals overflow.

Surgeons Quarter promotes, sells and manages all commercial activities held within the RCSEd campus. All profits support the charitable aims of the College which are education, assessment and advancement in surgical standards worldwide.

Main image credit: Ten Hill Place

The hospitality social media campaign sweeping the nation

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
The hospitality social media campaign sweeping the nation

James & Cranwell, a luxury hospitality headhunters company, has presented the ‘Hospitality 4 Heroes Challenge’ in aid of NHS workers during the COVID–19 pandemic…

The Hospitality 4 Heroes Challenge is a simple social media champaign that has emerged during the COVID–19 pandemic with the aim to raise funds for the NHS front line workers.

Set up by Warren James and Matthew Cranwell, the campaign asks the nation to upload a short video on social media doing something related to hospitality. Viewers will then be able to click a link which will direct them to a GoFundMe page that has been set up to support the NHS Charities Together Covid-19 Appeal.

“This is our way of giving back to the incredible superheroes at the NHS,” explained Warren James in the video that launched the initiative.

How to join the campaign:

  1. Upload a short video to introduce yourself, followed by a ‘how to’ video of your chosen hospitality-related challenge
  2. Share on your social media accounts, including the GoFundMe link and the hashtag #hospitality4heroes
  3. Tag three people in the post who then have 24 hours to complete their own challenge

The target is to raise £10,000 through the Hospitality for Heroes Challenge. “Whilst everyone’s priority is staying home and staying safe, we know that everyone is looking for ways to help,” the duo explain on the GoFundMe page. “We believe the Hospitality for Heroes Challenge is a powerful way to do that, whilst having some fun in the safety of your own home.”

The duo nominated Michael Bonsor (Managing Director of Rosewood London), Tom Booton (Head Chef of The Grill at The Dorchester) and Thomas Kochs (Managing Director of Corinthia London). Other individuals who have completed their challenges include Vincenzo Arnese (Head Sommelier at Dinner by Heston Blumenthal) and Martin Siska (Director of Scarfes Bar). The campaign is attracting the wide-spread attention of the industry as social media continues to play a crucial role during the COVID–19 pandemic.

The NHS Charities Together represents 140 member NHS charities throughout the UK, and funds from its COVID–19 appeal will help support the health and wellbeing of NHS staff and volunteers supporting COVID–19 patients in ways above and beyond that which NHS funding can ordinarily provide, including wellbeing packs and costs associated with travel, parking, accommodation and volunteer expenses.

Main image credit: Hospitality 4 Heroes