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INDUSTRY INSIGHT: F&B Design changes post-pandemic

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: F&B Design changes post-pandemic

Now that hospitality is beginning to open its doors once more, we asked Federico Schilling from Flair Studio to explore the challenges of designing F&B areas in the post-pandemic world…

With restaurants and pubs in UK set to reopen before the end of June/beginning of July, there is still a great deal of uncertainty about the measures and trends to be followed to provide a safe, yet engaging experience.

Everybody knows the Coronavirus outbreak is going to change the way we eat in restaurants but, while some of these changes will be short-lived, others will probably endure by becoming either a necessity or just good habits; In this short article I am about to explore how these challenges can change the restaurant design as well as how this can become an opportunity to generate new creative ideas through good design.

In the very short term, for those who have an outdoor space this will be highly valuable but also for those who haven’t, special initiatives so the business can spread outdoors can become very helpful.  In this direction, the temporary pedestrianisation of high streets or neighbourhoods can be seen as an occasion to enable people to socialise again while keeping safety measures into place. The Soho Summer Street Festival can be a great example. It was announced last week by Soho Estates with the aim to ban cars from entering key streets of the area and to request a relaxation from Westminster Council for the licensing of the public highways.

Now l would like to shortly explore what are the restaurant design changes which are probably here to stay by looking into space planning, technology and trends.

It is common sense that initially, the internal layout of medium to large size Restaurants will be revised by reducing the number of tables and by promoting smaller tables, which can be more easily distanced and are more flexible than large banquettes or communal tables. But it is also likely that from early 2021 the layout density will slowly revert back to the pre-lockdown arrangements level with minor changes aimed to provide a safer experience.

On the other hand, costumers will want to avoid touching things which are seen as un-necessary for a longer time: things such as menus, salt and peppers and other shared items will probably disappear and costumers will especially be reluctant to enter toilets unless these haven’t been equipped with adequate measures. If contactless solutions as well as anti-microbial materials can be easily implemented, it is desirable that human interaction with the staff will slowly come back to normal after an initial reduction. Open buffets and food sharing concepts will probably suffer the most and for a longer term, with hotels being the most affected with their large venues for breakfast and business lunches. Also, materials and finishes will change in direction to easily washable, anti-microbial surfaces, sometimes muted from the cruise ship fit-out industry, sometimes from the outdoor furniture collections.

Whether the above will become game changers or not, I believe that we as designers have a duty of care to the end user so that these measures can be implemented without compromising on the quality of the overall guest experience and the design outcome. If safety and well-being are paramount, we also shouldn’t forget that an essential part of eating out is about sharing that experience with the other dining guests, including the importance of the spaces and the atmosphere we share with them. Differentiation through design will then become even more important and this can ultimately help generate new creative ideas.

Flair Studio is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Pixabay

5 Minutes With: F&B talk with Mark Bithrey, Founder & Creative Director, B3 Designers

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
5 Minutes With: F&B talk with Mark Bithrey, Founder & Creative Director, B3 Designers

There is a serious question being put to the industry on whether public areas will ever be the same again. In an exclusive interview with Hotel Designs, Mark Bithrey, the Founder and Creative Director of B3 Designers sits down virtually with editor Hamish Kilburn to discuss F&B design in a post-pandemic world…

In just a few days time, Hotel Designs will go live to the world with its debut virtual conference. The topics we will explore during Hotel Designs LIVE will include technology, sleep, wellness and whether public areas will ever be the same again. In order to understand the role of F&B areas, while also getting an access-all-areas deeper look into the inner workings of the studio, I caught up with Mark Bithrey, the Founder and Creative Director of B3 Designers. The award-winning studio has transformed many F&B hospitality projects, such as The Prince Akatoki, Marriott Hotel Budapest and Ritz-Carlton Geneva among many others.

Hamish Kilburn: Thanks for joining me, Mark. How are you feeling right now as a hospitality interior designer?

Mark Bithrey: The world has been through really tough times, but this one has definitely knocked the hospitality industry for a six. I have always believed in 2 things: that hospitality will forever have a strong place in the world in some form or other, and two, that design plays a pivotal role in shaping a changing world. So I’m feeling a mix of anxious and eager.

HK: When restaurants do eventually open up, we are still looking at reduced covers and therefore revenue. What are your thoughts there?

MB: We have been helping clients redesign their restaurants for social distancing, with beautiful screens and additional features like plants and cushions. But you are right, it can mean reduced revenue. Some of our clients have been really creative and opened up whole new streams of revenue.

Image caption: Design in F&B has spilled into the marketing and packaging of products with a rise in demand for deliver/takeaway service. | Image credit: B3 Designers

HK: There is obviously a lot of focus on takeaways at the moment. How can F&B businesses be more creative when adapting to the times?

MB: Quick service has immense potential. Think about kiosks where you are able to churn out dishes quickly. Our clients at Mei Mei are doing just that, with Michelin star winning Chef Elizabeth Haigh at its helm. Also consider Itsu/Pret style shops, with impactful branding and graphics on the floor. You can look into takeaway/delivery-only kitchens with creative food packaging. Extra brownie points for eco-friendly packing! We are working with a Vietnamese restaurant in London at the moment to use clever packaging to build out loyalty, repeat orders, and engagement.

Image caption: Mei Mei has adapted its offer during the pandemic to focus on takeaway service | Image credit: B3 Designers

HK: Speaking of food delivery, it does mean that restaurants are reliant on the large delivery services that eat into their revenue considerably. How can they move away from using the shared delivery systems?

MB: Yes, indeed! Have you heard of Mumbai’s dabbawalas? It’s an incredible concept. Think localised kitchens, subscription meals, and your own fleet of delivery folk racing food on bicycles. Typically, a kitchen will cook a few hundred meals a day. The subscription lunch will include food that can be batch cooked – so a lentil dish, a curry, rice, and perhaps some bread. This is then packed into stainless steel “tiffin” boxes, and delivered quickly, while the food is still hot. Because the kitchens are localised, nobody is travelling more than a couple of kilometers and they are often the service teams themselves. The previous day’s box is picked up and brought back – no packaging waste!

Food trucks are another way to circumvent delivery commissions. With all the right permissions, you could set up in a park/outdoor space and serve up anything you want to, really. Think also about drive-throughs or walk-past counters for food pick up. You can even offer an interesting experience (graphics/games) while they wait in line.

Image caption: Gourmet takeaway food truck | Image credit: B3 Designers

Image caption: Gourmet takeaway food truck | Image credit: B3 Designers

HK: What about fine dining, how can businesses integrate social distancing into this concept?

MB: Without a doubt, fine dining is going to change for a while. Restaurants that get very crowded are going to have to give customers more room – which can be quite cool if you think about it.

Smaller restaurants however, are quite fortunate and can use their spaces to offer truly caring experiences. We have worked with Michelin star winning Chef Tom Aikens in the past, whose restaurant Muse spans 950 sq ft. “Muse is very unique in that it is for guests not only looking for great food in a very special restaurant, but welcomes them as if they were in their own home. Guests will always get special care and now more than ever, of being looked after and pampered,” said Aikens.

If you have outdoor space, however small, milk it. Erect pods or beautiful temporary structures. Adapt for weather changes with fans and space heaters. You could also think about bringing your restaurant completely outside – are you on a street that could be pedestrianised, or do you have parking space that could be converted?

For indoor spaces, think gorgeous on-brand free standing folding screens. In hotels, use your banquet rooms as restaurants so you can offer more space between tables.

If you want to be really creative, as the rules relax more, consider catering services for small gatherings, or even a fine dining experience that you can take to people’s homes. We may follow off where you mention that Muse is small, and say that it is massive in experience.

HK: Is there a way for F&B professionals to go where customers already are?

MB: Supermarkets and the internet! This is a great time to consider creating your own line of sauces/pastas/food kits. Paired with solid branding and graphics, it could open up a whole new stream of revenue. Could you create barbecue kits for example, with recipes and ingredients?

We are spending a ridiculous amount of time on the internet now. Host cooking lessons and sell kits after. And remember to up your digital presence – it is the only way people will learn of your restaurant/hotel’s F&B offerings.

Main image credit: B3 Designers

INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Visualising the future of F&B spaces in hotel design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
INDUSTRY INSIGHT: Visualising the future of F&B spaces in hotel design

Hospitality will awake from the pandemic to face new challenges when it comes to designing F&B spaces. Hotel Designs turns to the CGI experts at North Made Studio to try and visualise the future of these public-facing outlets…

With the industry on a hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be some important future choices to make for hoteliers.

These choices will need to be made in all areas, but may become most stark within the F&B spaces of their hotels.

Until government guidelines are released, exactly how this sector of the hotel industry will proceed is a mystery. Dictating dates for reopening and the easing of certain measures will be crucial to define how the industry needs to adapt.

Should measures not be eased enough and distancing remain in place for the foreseeable future, questions will need to asked about profitably for certain spaces in a ‘socially-distanced’ world. Within the hotel sector F&B spaces may not be deemed a profitable use of available space.

From a visualisation perspective there may be more focus put on the finer details of a F&B space. Viewpoints centred around individual seating areas, up-selling the attributes of the table setting, rather then focusing on the overall aspect of the whole F&B interior area.

Some hoteliers my choose to get ahead of the game and move F&B spaces outdoors, allowing the potential for these spaces to open sooner. Over the last few years interior design for the luxury F&B sector has tried to bring the outdoors in, with Biophilia becoming a growing trend. This potential move of F&B spaces from indoor to outdoors would switch this around. Visually this could allow for outdoor F&B spaces to be depicted with extensive greenery, using the current trend and taking it beyond what was capable within an indoor environment. Or the alternative could happen, and a drive to bring the indoor aesthetic to outdoor spaces could become a trend.

The visualisation sector is geared up to work with both interior and exterior spaces, minimising any differentiation between the CG imagery produced in terms quality or realism.

Another possibly trend for F&B spaces within the hotel sector may be to move more than just the seating/eating areas outdoors. With the popularity of street food kiosks, van and trailers, There is the potential to move the complete catering service outside. Providing an innovative feature to the hotel experience that also opens up the F&B space to the general public, increasing potential custom.

Another great possibility of this is that the catering trailer/van can easily be switched out, to provide customers will different food and drink offerings on a regular basis. Incredible engaging visualisation can be produced for these kinds of external spaces. Creating the scene is just the start, population elements can be embedded within the scene to built a complete visual that includes food trailers, tables, chairs, different demographic of people. Finer details can also be added such as drinks on tables, litter bins. The more detailed the space is visualised, the more realistic and engaging it can be.

To further explore the future of F&B spaces in hotel design, we need to take things back to a pre-COVID stage. Many companies are simply waiting out the Coronavirus pandemic, putting projects on hold, in the hope that things will return to some semblance of normality. For these type of businesses the visual aspects of their F&B spaces will continue to follow current trends.

Experiential

Customers need to be enticed to utilise the F&B facilities within the hotel, creating engaging design with attractive styling is key. Sell these experiences during the early phases of a project with 360 degree viewpoints and visual reality tours can be a great way of boosting interest and getting designs approved.

Convenience

A core factor for F&B spaces in hotels is their convenience. Ensuring the spaces are easily accessible and positioned close to heavy footfall areas, will help to increase their usage. Positioning and ‘eye-catching’ features can be showcased via traditional still CG images, assisting the planing and development phases.

Variety

No two hotel customers are the same, with hotel spaces being used for both business and pleasure, the needs of specific customers will vary. Offering a variety of services with a F&B space will accommodate for ‘on the go’ customers as well as those customers who have more time to sit down and have a full meal. Showcase these innovative features via the use of cameo shot visuals.

Adaptability

The ability for a F&B space to be multi-purpose is vital. Catering for breakfast, lunch, snacks, dinner and drinks allows for the capture of more customers throughout the day.

With the core features of the space remaining the same, the F&B space can be created in CGI for visualisation purposes, and redressed several times to show the adaptability of the space.

Image credit: North Made Studio

Overall F&B spaces within hotels are facing some challenging times. But whatever happens in the future regarding reaction to COVID, these spaces will always be required  in some form. And the visualisation sector will be there to assist with what changes to the design ethos are needed. If new ways to communicate a space are required, the technological advancements in virtual reality could be the key to creating ongoing engagement in the future.

North Made Studio is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: North Made Studio

CASE STUDY: Designing modern interiors for Kahani

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: Designing modern interiors for Kahani

KAI Interiors were approached by Michelin starred chef Peter Joseph to design his first solo venture restaurant, Kahani…

Taking inspiration from the concept of sharing food and swapping stories, essences of Indian anecdotes and fables have been scattered around the restaurant, this led to the name ‘Kahani’ meaning stories in Hindi.

Set in the beautiful Sloane square, underneath the Phoenix House Hotel and opposite Cadogan Hall you will discover a deep green set of double doors nestled into the classic architecture of Wilbraham Place.

As you enter, you see a beautiful upholstered wall that is made of soft blush, woven leather, this leads guests down the stairs. Indian antiquities and Kavaad [Indian story boxes] line the steps. You pass a warm mustard velvet curtained private dining room that is inspired by India’s national bird, the peacock. It’s a luxurious room in deep blues and greens. Using a large deep blue leather table top with brass trim and an elegant slim brass chandelier above, this space creates a cosy environment in which guests can enjoy a unique and intimate experience.

The ceiling is filled with an imprint of millions of miniscule beads laid out in an elegant weaving pattern. The chairs are deep blue velvet with a woven leather backing. Bespoke wallpaper, beautifully hand drawn by the team at Lyons and Tigers Creative Agency hangs as a backdrop to the room. The private room overlooks the main restaurant space with a balcony style mezzanine level. From above you might be able to notice the K within the timber floor boards, laid in different angles with brass trims.

Image credit: Kahani/KAI Interiors

One of the main obstacles we had to face was that this is a lower ground floor restaurant, we wanted the space to feel indulgent and luxurious rather than like a basement. To do this the main restaurant opens out to a double height ceiling with beautiful bespoke, suede ribbon chandeliers emphasising the height and openness.

Additionally, the back wall of the restaurant is home to the extensive wine cellar, exposed through a huge wall of glass it again emphasises the scale of the space.

As you enter the main restaurant, on the left there is one of KAI’s favourite features, a beautiful mosaic wall. This involved mixing a special render to obtain the exact colour, then meticulously hand placing the small, square mosaic tiles piece by piece into a pattern that was taken from Indian architecture. Sat in line with the mosaic wall is beautiful teal velvet seating, embellished with Indian embroidered ribbon.

The room dividers give privacy to the bar area with a peacock feather embossed glass and timber panel. Sat in the back corner is the original fireplace with cosy armchairs and a traditional Indian carved table.

One of the challenges was finding a balance between making the interiors exciting and welcoming but without detracting too much from the food and drink. Peter’s food is amazing, it’s so colourful and we had to think about how it would look on the table. The edge of the tables were etched with a henna pattern which linked with the bespoke henna style wallpaper we had hand drawn. If you look closely you can follow several fables within the wallpaper. We’ve used warm colours in the upholstery that don’t detract and kept the walls quite neutral, we wanted to ensure hints of India enriched the space.

Image credit: Kahani/KAI Interiors

The toilets are intimate yet exciting spaces. Taking inspiration from a colourful wall painting in India. We developed a pattern that was filled with hands poised in different positions replicating the different Mudras (hand gestures), rich greens and soft pinks covered the walls. As you look in the mirror your reflection is engulfed in the pattern behind. Terrazzo basins echoed the colours from the walls, matched with elegant brass taps.

The bar, meanwhile, has been modelled on Chand Baori, which is a beautiful step well of 3,500 narrow steps built over a thousand years ago in the Indian state of Rajasthan. Textured wallpapers are a back drop to the brass cantilevered steps that appear to be floating whilst displaying the premium alcohol offering. Elegant tubular pendant lights glow above the bar counter which is timber with marble infill’s. The bar façade is a unique herringbone veneer to give a subtle nod to the back bar steps.

KAI Interiors is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Kahani/KAI Interiors

Speakers announced for Hotel Designs’ F&B summits and forums

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Speakers announced for Hotel Designs’ F&B summits and forums

The Food & Drink Innovation Summit and the Catering Equipment & Services Forum both take place at Whittlebury Hall, Northamptonshire on March 30 – 31, 2020…

Next month, the industry’s leading suppliers and hospitality professionals will gather at Whittlebury Park for Forum Events’ Food & Drink Innovation Summit and the Catering Equipment & Services.

The unique two-day adjacent events will consist of one-to-one pre-arranged business meetings as well as a line up of professional speakers who will, together, unpick the ever-evolving trends and conversations on the F&B scene in hospitality.

Freelance journalist Sudi Pigott will ask the audience to expand their culinary boundaries when she delivers her engaging talk entitled: “The ever-evolving world of food trends”.

The session will explore the new ingredients, food cultures, rediscovering of forgotten flavours, making restaurant dining more experiential and why women of food matter.

Meanwhile, Anne-Marie, Food & Beverage Lecturer at Leeds City College will discuss what for many will be the elephant in the room. Her talk on:“The food and drink service revolution before and after Brexit”, will discuss Brexit’s impacts on service styles and diversity within the sector and what impacts being in Europe has made to the Industry.

How to attend Food and Drink Innovation Summit

If you are a supplier at the Food and Drink innovation Summit or Catering and would like to attend, please email Liam Cloona, or call 01992 374089.

If you are a delegate and would like to attend Catering Equipment & Services Summit the event, please email Annabelle Crossingham or call 01992 374054.

How to attend Catering Equipment & Services Forum

If you are a supplier at the Catering Equipment & Services Forum and would like to attend, please email Haydn Boxall or call 01992 374084.

If you are a delegate and would like to attend Catering Equipment & Services Summit the event, please email Annabelle Crossingham or call 01992 374054.

Macaulay Sinclair transforms former met bar into Gridiron at Como Metropolitan London

Hamish Kilburn

The interior, architecture and design studio behind the new Gridiron restaurant within COMO Metropolitan London Hotel in Old Park Lane, Mayfair has been unveiled as Nottingham-based Macaulay Sinclair

Design studio Macaulay Sinclair, which has created exceptional spaces for the hospitality sector such as Gleneagles, has transformed the former Met Bar into the new 60-cover restaurant and bar at COMO Matropolitan London Hotel, which opened this autumn.

Headed up by co-directors John Macaulay and Mike Sinclair, the studio has worked with a number of well-known multi-site and independent restaurant and bar operators across London and beyond, including Hawksmoor, Dishoom and Wright Brothers.

“The Met Bar was a go-to London destination and the celebrity haunt of the nineties and noughties era,” Sinclair said. “We are proud to have been part of the team to bring an indulgent and intimate dining experience into such a landmark location.”

The prestigious venue will be overseen by renowned chef Richard H. Turner of Turner and George, Blacklock, Hawksmoor and Meatopia.

Mike continued: “In order to give the new restaurant and bar its own identity while remaining synonymous with the COMO brand the interior design has been kept simple and understated, providing a subtle backdrop for Turner’s kitchen.”

Paying homage to the art of grilling over an open fire, the new restaurant has an open kitchen with modern live-fire grillroom. The interior is dominated by monochrome palette throughout, with accents of red, dark wood and marble. Wall finishings remain simple and sleek, and the stripped back furniture matches the ethos of the food and service: comfort and style without unnecessary formality.

 

 

Interior of the restuarant

Indoor-outdoor restaurant experience to open in luxury hotel in Chester, England

800 534 Hamish Kilburn

Palm Court Restaurant, Bar & Piano Lounge will open in to Chester’s Grosvenor Pulford Hotel & Spa this month…

A dining experience with a difference will be unveiled in Chester’s Grosvenor Pulford Hotel & Spa this month with the opening of Palm Court Restaurant, Bar & Piano Lounge.

Nelson Hotels have opened the multi-purpose dining venue with the aim to meet all needs of hotel guests, local residents, and visitors to the area. “We identified the need for a restaurant which would be suitable for all occasions and all guests,” said Harold Nelson, Chairman of Nelson Hotels. “Our vision was to create more than just a restaurant and so Palm Court will cater throughout the day and appeal to all dining requirements from casual to special occasion.”

The £1.5 million dining venue has been designed by award-winning interior design consultancy Lister Carter. With an impressive glass ceiling, the space has taken inspiration from a Victorian Palm House, bursting with the greenery of the Kentia Palm tree. The intimate restaurant and bar blends exposed industrial style metalwork and brickwork with luxurious crystal chandeliers, antique mirrors and bronze fretwork. The exposed steel, aged glass and bronze artwork lends itself to a warm but stripped back feel. A mix of marble and wood tables, comfortable leather and velvet chairs and plush sofas offers the customer a sumptuous experience whether it be morning coffee or evening cocktails.

One of the main focal points of Palm Court is a black Yamaha baby grand piano set amidst bubbling fountains and lush palm trees. As well as being the highest quality acoustic piano, it is a famed entertainment piano which boasts thousands of self-playing songs, so even without the pianist it will be music for the ears.

Dining experience

Palm Court is also home to an exclusive wine cave with floor to ceiling wine racks showcasing Laurent Perrier Champagnes and housing almost 100 different varieties of old and new world wines and Champagnes along with specially selected, fine cellar wines. Mirrored walls and a crystal seed chandelier give a luxurious, chic feel. With a poser table seating up to six people, the wine cave will be used for wine tastings and exclusive private dining.

Country-house style dining area

Hilton Puckrup Hall completes contemporary F&B renovation

800 533 Hamish Kilburn

The hotel’s F&B areas in the Cotswolds was designed by Central Design Studio…

Inspired by the colours and textures of the nearby Cotswolds countryside with a contemporary spin, Hilton Puckrup Hall has completed an F&B renovation that was led by Ian Haigh, creative director Ian Haigh of Central Design Studio.

The aim of the renovation was to create a restaurant and bar with a modern, British feel.

Olive wallcoverings and royal blue carpets

Designed to resemble more of a country house rather than a hotel public area, the restaurant is a celebration of local British produce, without being old-fashioned or stuffy. Modern paintings adorn the walls, and quality crafted furniture and upholstery add to the sense of place.

The bar has an informal character whatever the time of day. Dark woods and a deep indigo colour scheme complement tactile British fabrics and finishes, again with colourful and curated artwork playing a part.

Many of the furniture and lighting pieces were designed bespoke by Central Design Studio, in close collaboration with various artisans and manufacturers in the UK and Ireland. In addition, the artwork was curated and commissioned especially for the project, including the large-format paintings that hang in the restaurant, using up-and-coming illustrators and artists.

Light, airy interiors in dining area

“The challenge with this project was to make the space feel contemporary, without compromising on that cosy and comfortable atmosphere,” said Haigh. “The artwork in particular really helps this, as it brings a  subtle energy and freshness to the design.”

Accents of lightly antiqued brass add to the sense of familiarity and warmth, and run throughout the whole design. This is highlighted by two large, hand-crafted brass screens made in South East London. Designed by Central Design Studio in collaboration with Creative Metalwork, they are a real feature and talking point and cleverly used to divide up the restaurant space.

High-quality Axminster carpet was chosen for the floor finish in both the restaurant and the bar, again to a tailored design developed by Central Design Studio and Brintons. The pantry on the other hand, used primarily for breakfast service, has more of a country kitchen aesthetic to it with a limestone-effect floor and lighter colour scheme.

Key Suppliers

Main Contractor: Zenith
Joinery Contractor: Wreake Valley
Lighting (bespoke chandeliers): Northern Lights
Brass screens: Creative Metalwork
Furniture (bespoke banquettes): Craftwoord
Furniture (general): Contract Chair Co. / Inside Out
Carpet: Brintons

Lodore Falls Hotel unveils new restaurant as part of £10m renovation

640 427 Hamish Kilburn

Lodore Falls Hotel, part of the Lake District Hotels group, has announced the launch of its new 70-seater Pan Asian restaurant, Mizu

Taking its name from the Japanese for ‘falling water’, Mizu occupies a prime and appropriate spot, directly overlooking the stunning Lodore Falls waterfall.

Becoming the hotel’s second restaurant, Mizu reflects a relaxed ambiance with cool, elemental colours, floor-to-ceiling windows coupled with natural textures and materials.

Leading the interior design project was Ashleigh Doherty from Greyline Design. She said: “Mizu took inspiration from the local colour palette of warm green hues mixed with timber elements reflecting the surrounding woods. A modern feeling has been retained with contrasting concrete tiling, glazed bar front and a beautiful geometric floor. We have tried to honour the clients own heritage with Scandinavian style furniture upholstered in rich, tweed fabrics bringing warmth and texture to the restaurant.  A lounge area was added with luxurious deep buttoned leather sofas and comfortable chairs. Feature pendant and wall lights enhance warmth, creating a comfortable and relaxing atmosphere.”

Scheduled to launch mid May, the new restaurant’s open kitchen allows for guests to watch talented head chef Kasun Jayasooriya as he serves up a fusion of Asian dishes.

Marketing Director of Lake District Hotels, Daniella Hope, said: “We are delighted to have made recent investment, such as refurbishing our public areas, developing new larger, luxurious bedroom suites and now with the creation and launch of Mizu restaurant. The stunning natural beauty of the Lake District makes it a competitive market place but we at Lodore Falls Hotel are confident that we offer something uniquely exciting.”

The hotel’s overall investment is £10 million, with phase one now complete and saw the refurbishment of the hotel’s entire ground floor. Phase two sees the opening of Mizu restaurant and four spacious bedroom suites. As well as a further 14 bedroom suites and the much anticipated, The Falls Spa will launch during mid September 2018.

lakedistricthotels.net/lodorefalls