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public areas

SPOTLIGHT ON: Unconventional public areas

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
SPOTLIGHT ON: Unconventional public areas

To mark the change of focus of Hotel Designs’ editorial lens, editor Hamish Kilburn goes on a journey to discover some of the world’s most unconventional hotel lobbies and public spaces… 

From striking rooftop bars above bustling metropolises to home-from-home hot-desk sanctuaries, the design of hotel public areas have evolved to capture not only a property’s rare personality but also a brand’s ethos and character.

While luxury hotel etiquette and demand has changed, one thing has remained firm for the operators and designers alike: you only have one opportunity to make a lasting first impression, which is arguably most true when it comes to designing the hotel lobby and public spaces. It’s a fine balancing skill to master. Designing a space suitable and accessible for everyone, but creating skilfully and meaningfully designing public spaces that add drama in all the right areas without coming across too strong can take a well-designed hotel into the realms of extraordinary masterpieces.

To kickstart Hotel Designs firmly positioning Public Areas under the editorial spotlight this month, here are nine uniquely designed lobbies and public spaces that each aptly amplify a hotel’s purpose and charm.

The Ritz Carlton – Astana

Image credit: Ritz Carlton

With a unique yet graceful design, The Ritz-Carlton – Astana is a natural extension of the square around the nearby Bayterek Tower, a monument and symbol of modern Astana. The property features an architectural lighting scheme designed by Nulty Lighting with carefully positioned luminaires in the soffit, which graze light across the fins for a dappled effect. In the restaurant, surface-mounted spotlights nestle within a bronze trough that cuts through an otherwise architecturally clean ceiling, complemented by a suspended rail with adjustable spotlights, which drops from the same detailing to provide a focus along the continuous marble counter, drawing the eye through the space.

PUBLIC Hotel, New York

Image credit: Public Hotel, New York

Featuring what our editorial team are unofficially concluding as the largest sofa in the world, PUBLIC, designed by legendary designer Ian Schrager, has all the necessary ingredients of a successful urban retreat. The New York-based hotel is known for being refined, sophisticated, smart, simple, yet flamboyant and provocative all at the same time. Its public areas, complete with high ceilings and modern comfortable furniture, attract locals and guests alike to work, socialise and simply chill out in a comfortable setting.

The Standard London

Image credit: The Standard London

The ground floor inside The Standard London was inspired by the groovy 70s, a decade full of character with Psychedelic Furs (the early years), Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin and the debut of The Muppets and Star Wars capturing the movement.

The Standard London’s lobby/lounge features fabulous circular fixtures and quirky furniture that set the scene. The carefully curated library pays homage to the building’s original use. Look down and you’ll notice a sumptuous orange rug leading the way into the hotel, look up and the bright red ceiling offsets the striped wooden walls and the blue mural behind the reception – forcing you to take everything you thought you knew about maximalism and throwing it out the window. The muted lamps and pot plants only enhance the boldness of the lobby’s design.

AKELARRE Hotel

Image credit: AKELARRE Hotel.

Architecture studio Mecanismo was responsible for the construction and interior design of AKELARRE Hotel. The carefully and meaningfully designed public areas evoke a sense of calm with a clever use of curves. The design concept was to use elements that coexist in harmony with the surrounding environment, to connect the interiors with the striking views of landscape that surrounds.

The Murray Hotel, Hong Kong

Image credit: The Murray Hotel

The Murray Hotel was a preservation project undertaken by Foster + Partners, the brief being to design a 336-key luxury hotel within the shell of one of the city’s most iconic landmarks that was built in 1969.

The hotel’s rooftop bar and restaurant both reflect Hong Kong’s vibrant cosmopolitan style, open to the city’s flamboyant population. The interior spaces feature high-end luxury furniture from Minotti, including Aston sofas and Lounge little armchairs animated by vivacious Cesar side tables. A wraparound terrace frames the restaurant with Aston “Cord” Outdoor sofas, armchairs and dining chairs.

Nobis Hotel Copenhagen

Image credit: Nobis Hotel Copenhagen

The patterned-geometric rug, cosy leather seating and contemporary white lighting reflects Scandi modern living. The home-from-home lobby inside Nobis Hotel Copenhagen, designed by Wingårdh Architects, shelters subtle deft touches, clean lines and playful colour while balancing the well-to-do elegance of the original building.

The Langham, Chicago

Image credit: Langham Hotels

The Langham Chicago, designed by Richmond International, is part of the former IBM tower, the final masterpiece of architect Mies Van Der Rohe and a well-loved feature of Chicago’s skyline, which the design team respected while creating a new, luxurious hotel inside its magnificent shell.

The designers opened up the reception with double-height spaces and introduced views of the city and the Chicago River. Materials such as bronze and travertine reference the original building, while decorative elements including onyx and velvet were inspired by the architect’s residences. The result is a warm, elegant hotel that honours its past.

nhow London

‘London Reloaded’ was the interior design concept for nhow London. The design studio Project Orange stretched that broad theme to its limits when imagining the look and feel of the the lobby inside the 190-key hotel. Although the arrival experience is impressive and memorable, we believe that the corridors, which often become ‘dead spaces’ are a true reflection of the studio’s ability to uniquely narrate a story with interiors. Inspired by a London stroll in the park, the corridors feature detailed HD carpets by Brintons and has been brought to life with humour. Each floor, facing the lifts, features a stencil of a bike chained to a fence. As guests move up each levels of the hotel, another part of the bike is removed, which is a playful nod to the reality of most, if not all, for cyclists in the city.

Proper Hotel San Francisco

Image credit: Proper Hotels

The flagship property of Proper Hotels is nestled in a landmarked flatiron-style building in San Francisco’s vibrant Mid-Market district., and features captivating interiors by designer Kelly Wearstler. The designer’s luxury residential style is arguably most felt in the lobby, which has been created using a clash of patterns, colours and textures alongside European furniture pieces from a number of design movements in history.

Main image credit: AKELARRE Hotel

LIGHTING WATCH: Berkley Collection from Christopher Hyde

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
LIGHTING WATCH: Berkley Collection from Christopher Hyde

Christopher Hyde Lighting beautiful Berkeley table lamp was recently supplied in the lobby area of a luxury hotel in Moscow…

The stunning and imposing table lamp allows the interior designer to put the finishing touches into their own five-star project. The design of the Berkeley collection features delicate cast brass details. Available in many different finishes from the ever popular french gold and antique silver to polished rose gold and soft bronze. Complimented by Christopher Hyde’s hand crafted silk lampshades the Berkeley table lamp is sure to brighten up any lobby.

The Berkeley range is on display at the company’s showroom at the Design Centre in Chelsea Harbour, London.

Christopher Hyde’s new catalogue is released soon and is available to order.

Christopher Hyde is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email  Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Christopher Hyde

PRODUCT WATCH: UNILIN’s Clicwall is a striking wall without compromising durability

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
PRODUCT WATCH: UNILIN’s Clicwall is a striking wall without compromising durability

UNILIN, division panels, has released an extra-high panel in its Clicwall fast-to-install decorative wall system…

Producing seamless vertical runs on walls up to 3.5m in height, Clicwall high panels retain the ease and simplicity of the patented Uniclic click-joint and easy slide strip, delivering superfast fitting in commercial interiors.

Ideal for retail stores and hospitality interiors looking to deliver high-impact wall features, Clicwall is available in 137 different decors, as well as ClicwallPaint, ready for paint, fabric, wallpaper or a custom high-definition digital print.

From plain colours to a range of realistic wood and concrete designs, spaces can be instantly transformed with walls that deliver great looks and faultless commercial performance.

“Clicwall is made from 100 per cent circular wood, with not a single tree ever felled to directly produce the panels.”

Heleen Verhamme, product manager, Clicwall, says: “Where high walls could be covered by putting two panels on top of each other, Unilin panels now offers an easier and faster solution: a second standard dimension of 3500 mm height. The new size makes Clicwall even more versatile and ready to take on a wider range of commercial environments, including retail stores and hospitality venues. With the wall as a key visual space in these locations, Clicwall’s new high panels can lead to a cleaner look that really helps digital print graphics pop.”

Available in standard, fire-retardant and moisture-resistant MDF core specifications, Clicwall comes in a 10mm thickness and in panel sizes of 600 x 2785mm and 600 x 3500mm. Clicwall is made from 100 per cent circular wood, with not a single tree ever felled to directly produce the panels. The MDF boards are based on pre-consumer wood supplied by the timber industry and thinned wood from sustainable forestry and verge management, much of which is sourced locally to reduce pollution caused by transport and provide a solution for wood seen as waste by our suppliers.

With a huge array of wood, stone and concrete finishes that look and feel just like the original material, Clicwall uses the know-how developed through Evola decorative surfaces to bring a striking wall without compromising durability, everyday performance and easy maintenance.

UNILIN is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, please email  Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: UNILIN

Carlton Tel Aviv reveals new public area interior scheme

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Carlton Tel Aviv reveals new public area interior scheme

Award-winning hotel Carlton Tel Aviv speaks to bleisure trend with infusion of new, contemporary art, stylish lightning schemes, and a circular beachfront lobby bar and beyond…

Carlton Tel Aviv, a The 268-key luxury property that was voted “Israel’s Leading Business Hotel 2019” by World Travel Awards, today officially reveals its newly designed lobby, corridors, business lounge, work spaces and lobby bar.

With the aim to offer guests an infusion of new and artistic decor, lighting schemes, public areas and workspaces, the hotel commissioned interior design studio Yaron Tal to manifest new and fresh renovations as Tel Aviv continues to excel as one of the world’s most attractive destinations for both leisure and business travel.

To make walking through the corridors a more meaningful experience, the new design exists of deep, warm and rich materials. Warm colors such as deep blue and copper are used, and rich materials such as copper and brass. Wallpaper printed with copper accents are to be found throughout the corridors. The unique and reflective, yet romantic lights, gives a sense of lightness in the historic Brutalist building.

The concept in the lobby was to make a lighter, less heavy feel to the lobby that is a blend between business and pleasure. Materials such as oak wood, rich fabrics, glass and brass, allow a more formal atmosphere to mix with young and sophisticated, and with the feeling of a luxury vacation.

In the old floor plan, the bar was somewhat hidden in the back of the lobby. By bringing the bar to the front of the lobby it becomes more inviting, and a central meeting point at the hotel. The design, with ceramic tiles of which both colour and shape complement the view, the bar is now a central area, offering a relaxing environment for breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails with a view over the Mediterranean Sea.

Main image credit: Carlton Tel Aviv

How Living Coral can energise your hotel

800 580 Hamish Kilburn

Hotel Designs’ recommended supplier Signbox explores how to make the most out of Pantone’s colour of the year, Living Coral… 

Since the 1960s, Pantone has been influencing creatives who rely on its standardised colour reproduction system for design and print continuity, consistency and inspiration. Every year it unveils a new Pantone Colour of the Year to reflect a new season of trends and influences that will fire the imagination of product developers and purchasers, designers and retailers; in 2019 that task falls to the incoming Colour of the Year: Pantone 16-1546 Living Coral.

Described by Pantone as ‘sociable and spirited…the fusion of modern life…a lively presence’, Living Coral looks set to make a rapturous impact on the work of the signage industry’s more ingenious manufacturers – and that means energised workspaces, invigorated teams and an altogether happier working environment.

This isn’t just marketing parlance; according to Pantone, there’s a psychological connection to be had with Living Coral and it could just be the game changer that business owners are looking for if the wellbeing and productivity of their workforces need a lift.

The Pantone Colour Institute is the unit that forecasts global colour trends and advises companies on product and brand visual identity colour palettes to leverage the power of colour – so it knows a thing or two about emotional responses to colour.

“Living Coral’s flamboyant, lively and effervescent shade will mesmerise the mind and create an aura of confidence, energy and positivity.”

“Vibrant, yet mellow Living Coral embraces us with warmth and nourishment to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment’, explains Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Colour Institute. “In reaction to the onslaught of digital technology and social media increasingly embedding into daily life, we are seeking authentic and immersive experiences that enable connection and intimacy. Sociable and spirited, the engaging nature of Living Coral welcomes and encourages light-hearted activity. Symbolising our innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits, Living Coral embodies our desire for playful expression.”

Translate that to a workplace or hotel environment and Living Coral’s flamboyant, lively and effervescent shade will mesmerise the mind and create an aura of confidence, energy and positivity. Consider the impact of Living Coral’s hue on branding, wayfinding, environmental graphics and glass manifestation, for example, and it’s easy to see how powerful an interior design scheme can be as a motivating force. It’s a colour that encourages communication too, so expect to see leadership spirits fired and employees galvanised.

The power of colour when it comes to branding

Never underestimate the power of colour to create an emotional relationship with a brand and its physical space. With the capacity to affect us physically, intellectually and emotionally, colour is a critical component when it comes to applying a brand identity and an interior workplace scheme that reflects it.

Take digital wallpaper. It can be a big, bold and exciting step that can transform your office vista. But, don’t just choose a show-stopping image to project across your walls and place your order; consider first how your colour palette will influence your team, your partners and clients – the decisions they make and activities they undertake can have a serious effect on your business. Set them up for success with a colour that suits your environment, your market sector and the mood you want to induce.

A perfect colour for hotel and leisure environments

Take Living Coral. It’s comprised of red, yellow and orange – colours that can increase workplace productivity and inspire workforce wellbeing. What’s not to love?

  • Red is a physical colour that represents courage, strength and excitement – a great colour to use in work areas that demand physical exertion.
  • Yellow is an emotional colour that represents creativity, friendliness, optimism and confidence. Incorporate it when you want to stimulate positivity, creativity and happiness.
  • Orange blends the physicality of red with the emotion of yellow to create a sense of comfort and nurturing.

So, when you’ve assessed the impact that colours like Living Coral can have on the human body and its emotional relationships with space, you can apply it to the most appropriate areas. Living Coral can inspire transformative change in areas where creativity or physical activity needs an added stimulus – think design studios and gyms, for example. Since it also stimulates socialisation, it could work wonders in hotel and leisure environments – places where you want your clients to linger for longer and spend more perhaps.

If you want more advice on how to use colour to energise, inspire or motivate, talk to Signbox about impactful environmental graphic solutions on +44 (0)1784 438688, click here for our electronic brochure or send us your requirements. If you’d like guidance on what architectural signs or graphics will help your organisation perform better, an on-site consultation will give you the answers you seek.

Signbox is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, click here.

Lodore Falls Hotel & Spa completes final stages of £10m redevelopment

Hamish Kilburn

The newly redevelopment of the hotel & spa unveils contemporary design that blends Scandinavian style and British countryside sophistication… 

Nestled in the heart of the Lake District’s beautiful Borrowdale valley, Lodore Falls Hotel & Spa is excited to share the luxury design details of its multi-million-pound redevelopment, including a new state-of-the-art spa and 18 new Spa Suites. The 87-bedroom hotel received a full ground-floor refurbishment in 2017 and in April 2018 opened a pan-Asian restaurant, Mizu. The final phase of the redevelopment is now complete, opening a new destination spa and accompanying spa suites.

The new Falls Spa has been designed with guests’ comfort and relaxation in mind, featuring Scandi-inspired décor, bespoke designer furniture, luxury bathrooms and cosy seating areas. The purpose, style and mood of the spa according to each room’s function have been carefully considered. Furnishings and light fixtures by Tom Dixon and Moooi help blend streamlined Scandinavian style and British countryside sophistication.

The overall ambience of the spa’s Champagne Bar is a moody, Scandinavian revival, reflected through its elegant light fixtures exclusively designed by George Cawardine for Anglepoise, Chen Bikovski for Compagnie and Terence Woodgate. The upholstery is all bespoke leather and fabric sourced from Skai, Warwick, Osborne and Little and Casamance. Soft furnishings have been meticulously chosen to entice spa goers to truly relax into their depths, leaving behind the stresses and strains of everyday life.

“The Falls Spa is a natural haven where water inspires the fluidity of the spa design.”

Guests are welcomed into the spa reception by stylish upholstered furniture, designed by Tom Dixon and Graham and Green, boasting  custom-made velvets, tweeds and dobby weaves, showcasing the best of elegant British design. Guests feel the harnessing power of nature as the earthy hues of the spa bring the outside in. The Khaki/Aqua/Chartreuse colour pallete is intended to compliment the environment whilst remaining fresh and contemporary.

The spa’s Relaxation Room bridges the gap between interior and exterior through its floor to ceiling windows that fill the room with natural light and offer guests breath-taking panoramic views over the stunning fells, forest and lake. This room is designed to be more soothing and restful, with Anthracite panelling, Faux Shagreen ceiling and grey carpet, lifted by gleaming copper wall lights and plush loungers. The Relaxation Room loungers are bespoke for the spa, upholstered in Osborne and Little Velvet, complete with a custom-made cushion in reversible fabric from Zinc Textiles

The treatment rooms complete the Scandinavian revival and Nordic retreat feel. Taking great inspiration from the beautiful surrounding nature and the hotel’s gorgeous grounds, the outdoors seamlessly blend with the spa interior. The Falls Spa is a natural haven where water inspires the fluidity of the spa design and treatments; from the soothing rhythm of the Lodore Falls waterfall, to the reflective tranquillity of Derwentwater. The walls and floor have a modern, functional take on lime washed wooden planks and Faux Shagreen ceiling to associate with the Relaxation Room. The treatment rooms feature ambient lights designed by renowned designer Moooi, with adjustable settings to tailor the mood of the room with the treatment being offered.

After a dip in the infinity-edge vitality pool guests can make their way to their luxurious room, choosing from 18 brand new spa suites, allowing guests to maximise their time at The Falls Spa. Guests booking into the new Spa Suites enjoy complimentary access to The Falls Spa, while all other hotel guests can visit the spa for £25 for a four-hour experience. Most suites boast spacious balconies and panoramic views of the lake or surrounding forests. All suites are Scandi-inspired in their aesthetic and are fitted with modern, high quality amenities meaning that guests can settle down in a comfortable chair while reading a book or watching the large flat screen TV. When it comes to bed time, guests can look forward to a restful night’s sleep between crisp white sheets on luxurious Sealy beds.

Room schemes are paired back, with textured wallpaper, whitewashed oak and teak cladding, while pops of colour in fabrics, carpets and abstract prints sourced from King & McGaw bring the rooms to life. Several of the bespoke upholstered sofas are fun redesigns of chaise lounge sofas, paired with cushions from Romo, Osborne and Little and Rubelli.

This historic property is filled with understated yet luxurious touches such as muted tones of leather, tweed and rich velvets and a strong focus on modern design and high quality finish. Designed through a contemporary lens, these new design details blend seamlessly with the property’s traditional elements and offer guests an unforgettable stay in a luxurious and stylish hotel.

Country-house style dining area

Hilton Puckrup Hall completes contemporary F&B renovation

800 533 Hamish Kilburn

The hotel’s F&B areas in the Cotswolds was designed by Central Design Studio…

Inspired by the colours and textures of the nearby Cotswolds countryside with a contemporary spin, Hilton Puckrup Hall has completed an F&B renovation that was led by Ian Haigh, creative director Ian Haigh of Central Design Studio.

The aim of the renovation was to create a restaurant and bar with a modern, British feel.

Olive wallcoverings and royal blue carpets

Designed to resemble more of a country house rather than a hotel public area, the restaurant is a celebration of local British produce, without being old-fashioned or stuffy. Modern paintings adorn the walls, and quality crafted furniture and upholstery add to the sense of place.

The bar has an informal character whatever the time of day. Dark woods and a deep indigo colour scheme complement tactile British fabrics and finishes, again with colourful and curated artwork playing a part.

Many of the furniture and lighting pieces were designed bespoke by Central Design Studio, in close collaboration with various artisans and manufacturers in the UK and Ireland. In addition, the artwork was curated and commissioned especially for the project, including the large-format paintings that hang in the restaurant, using up-and-coming illustrators and artists.

Light, airy interiors in dining area

“The challenge with this project was to make the space feel contemporary, without compromising on that cosy and comfortable atmosphere,” said Haigh. “The artwork in particular really helps this, as it brings a  subtle energy and freshness to the design.”

Accents of lightly antiqued brass add to the sense of familiarity and warmth, and run throughout the whole design. This is highlighted by two large, hand-crafted brass screens made in South East London. Designed by Central Design Studio in collaboration with Creative Metalwork, they are a real feature and talking point and cleverly used to divide up the restaurant space.

High-quality Axminster carpet was chosen for the floor finish in both the restaurant and the bar, again to a tailored design developed by Central Design Studio and Brintons. The pantry on the other hand, used primarily for breakfast service, has more of a country kitchen aesthetic to it with a limestone-effect floor and lighter colour scheme.

Key Suppliers

Main Contractor: Zenith
Joinery Contractor: Wreake Valley
Lighting (bespoke chandeliers): Northern Lights
Brass screens: Creative Metalwork
Furniture (bespoke banquettes): Craftwoord
Furniture (general): Contract Chair Co. / Inside Out
Carpet: Brintons