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CASE STUDY: Designing modern interiors for Kahani

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
CASE STUDY: Designing modern interiors for Kahani

KAI Interiors were approached by Michelin starred chef Peter Joseph to design his first solo venture restaurant, Kahani…

Taking inspiration from the concept of sharing food and swapping stories, essences of Indian anecdotes and fables have been scattered around the restaurant, this led to the name ‘Kahani’ meaning stories in Hindi.

Set in the beautiful Sloane square, underneath the Phoenix House Hotel and opposite Cadogan Hall you will discover a deep green set of double doors nestled into the classic architecture of Wilbraham Place.

As you enter, you see a beautiful upholstered wall that is made of soft blush, woven leather, this leads guests down the stairs. Indian antiquities and Kavaad [Indian story boxes] line the steps. You pass a warm mustard velvet curtained private dining room that is inspired by India’s national bird, the peacock. It’s a luxurious room in deep blues and greens. Using a large deep blue leather table top with brass trim and an elegant slim brass chandelier above, this space creates a cosy environment in which guests can enjoy a unique and intimate experience.

The ceiling is filled with an imprint of millions of miniscule beads laid out in an elegant weaving pattern. The chairs are deep blue velvet with a woven leather backing. Bespoke wallpaper, beautifully hand drawn by the team at Lyons and Tigers Creative Agency hangs as a backdrop to the room. The private room overlooks the main restaurant space with a balcony style mezzanine level. From above you might be able to notice the K within the timber floor boards, laid in different angles with brass trims.

Image credit: Kahani/KAI Interiors

One of the main obstacles we had to face was that this is a lower ground floor restaurant, we wanted the space to feel indulgent and luxurious rather than like a basement. To do this the main restaurant opens out to a double height ceiling with beautiful bespoke, suede ribbon chandeliers emphasising the height and openness.

Additionally, the back wall of the restaurant is home to the extensive wine cellar, exposed through a huge wall of glass it again emphasises the scale of the space.

As you enter the main restaurant, on the left there is one of KAI’s favourite features, a beautiful mosaic wall. This involved mixing a special render to obtain the exact colour, then meticulously hand placing the small, square mosaic tiles piece by piece into a pattern that was taken from Indian architecture. Sat in line with the mosaic wall is beautiful teal velvet seating, embellished with Indian embroidered ribbon.

The room dividers give privacy to the bar area with a peacock feather embossed glass and timber panel. Sat in the back corner is the original fireplace with cosy armchairs and a traditional Indian carved table.

One of the challenges was finding a balance between making the interiors exciting and welcoming but without detracting too much from the food and drink. Peter’s food is amazing, it’s so colourful and we had to think about how it would look on the table. The edge of the tables were etched with a henna pattern which linked with the bespoke henna style wallpaper we had hand drawn. If you look closely you can follow several fables within the wallpaper. We’ve used warm colours in the upholstery that don’t detract and kept the walls quite neutral, we wanted to ensure hints of India enriched the space.

Image credit: Kahani/KAI Interiors

The toilets are intimate yet exciting spaces. Taking inspiration from a colourful wall painting in India. We developed a pattern that was filled with hands poised in different positions replicating the different Mudras (hand gestures), rich greens and soft pinks covered the walls. As you look in the mirror your reflection is engulfed in the pattern behind. Terrazzo basins echoed the colours from the walls, matched with elegant brass taps.

The bar, meanwhile, has been modelled on Chand Baori, which is a beautiful step well of 3,500 narrow steps built over a thousand years ago in the Indian state of Rajasthan. Textured wallpapers are a back drop to the brass cantilevered steps that appear to be floating whilst displaying the premium alcohol offering. Elegant tubular pendant lights glow above the bar counter which is timber with marble infill’s. The bar façade is a unique herringbone veneer to give a subtle nod to the back bar steps.

KAI Interiors is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Kahani/KAI Interiors

In (Lockdown) Conversation With: Robert Whitfield, GM of The Dorchester

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In (Lockdown) Conversation With: Robert Whitfield, GM of The Dorchester

With the UK hospitality industry drastically adjusting its strategy during lockdown, Hotel Designs takes the opportunity to re-connect with one of the world’s most prestigious hotel brands, Dorchester Collection. Editor Hamish Kilburn speaks to Robert Whitfield, the brand’s Regional Director (UK) & General Manager of The Dorchester

For centuries, Mayfair’s leafy Park Lane has been the epicentre of London’s luxury hospitality scene. At present, though, the streets are bare and the extravagant entrances into opulent lobbies and extraordinary lifestyles remain (for the time being at least) sealed shut – and its not the kind of lock-in one is familiar with.

Among the five-star (currently empty) shells stretched along the east side of Hyde Park is The Dorchester, an iconic place that really does define its destination. Since its grand opening in 1931 – the same year the Empire State Building was completed in New York – the hotel, designed by architects William Curtis Green and Sir Owen Williams, has been setting new standards in premium hospitality.

89 years from when the famous doors first opened, the hotel stands majestically as ever having adapted sensitively to meet the demands of modern luxury travellers while also retaining its illustrious character. However, it, along with the rest of the hospitality industry, is facing unprecedented times, as the COVID–19 pandemic sends hospitality into paralysation.

To learn more about what the hotel is doing during lockdown, as well as celebrating its recent successes, I speak to the man at the helm, Robert Whitfield, who is the Regional Director UK of Dorchester Collection and General Manager of The Dorchester.

Hamish Kilburn: Robert, can you tell us a bit more about how The Dorchester is coping during the global health crisis, and how are you staying connected with your community?

Robert Whitfield: There is no denying that the global crisis has hit everyone hard, and sadly the hospitality industry is one of the worst to be affected. However, what it has re-affirmed for me is the true connection our team members have, keeping morale high and each other in good spirits. If you work in hospitality you have a natural instinct to want to be around people and make them feel at home, it’s in our DNA. So, we have channelled that passion into further helping our community.

Image caption: The living room inside the Harlequin at The Dorchester-

Image caption: The living room inside the Harlequin at The Dorchester

The Dorchester is very proud to have established an ongoing partnership with Manorfield Primary School in East London, working closely with pupils and staff on a number of initiatives since 2019, including helping raise funds to go towards developing their learning kitchen and donating furniture for areas of the school. As part of our continued partnership and as a response to the current global health crisis, we are providing chefs from The Dorchester’s staff restaurant to cook for the faculty and children of parents who are part of the essential workforce. We are also offering recipe classes to the pupils of the school to help keep them engaged and interested in cooking.

Every evening, The Dorchester illuminates in bright blue as a ‘thank you’ to the NHS and essential workers. Employees of The Dorchester, 45 Park Lane, and Coworth Park have pledged their support to the NHS and are assisting in the donation and distribution of food and necessary supplies to those impacted by COVID-19.

Image caption: During the COVID–19 pandemic, The Dorchester illuminates in bright blue each evening as a nod and ‘thank you’ to the NHS and essential workers

Executive chef Stefan Trepp and executive pastry chef Daniel Texter, along with chefs Jordan Champions and Sanjam Nagpal, handcrafted Easter Eggs for distribution amongst patients and staff of Great Ormond Street Hospital to help them celebrate the Easter weekend.

Dorchester Collection has also donated £25,000 on behalf of its UK hotels to Hospitality Action, a non-profit who supports hospitality workers who are in need and to help feed their families. Several colleagues have also signed up to the Golden Friends scheme via Hospitality Action and are making regular check-in calls to hospitality retirees in isolation due to the crisis.

Image caption: The living room inside The Dorchester's Terrace Penthouse

Image caption: The elegant living room that captures a unique London skyline vista inside The Dorchester’s Terrace Penthouse

HK: How do you stay connected to guests when they aren’t able to physically come to visit the hotels?

RW: Several of our team members have fostered great relationships with our guests over the years and are in regular contact with them via calls and email. We are also engaged with our most loyal guests to keep them in touch with news and updates from the hotel.

One of the best ways for us to stay connected to our guests after they have stayed with us is through our social media platforms. We are transferring our team’s talents online, showcasing our chef’s recipes and how-to’s, as-well-as expert tips from our sommelier or florist. This is a fun way for our social community to still see the smiley faces of some of our team members and hopefully learn a thing or two.

Quick-fire round:

HK: What is your favourite luxury item that you own?
RW:
My MGB sports car

HK: What was the last hotel you stayed in and what was the purpose of the trip?
RW:
The Pendry in San Diego meeting up with my kids for the Presidents Day Holiday weekend.

HK: In three words, can you describe the Dorchester Collection family?
RW:
Caring, passionate, fun-loving! 

HK: What superpower would make your job easier?
RW:
Teleporting.

HK: Why is Britain such a hub for luxury hotels?

RW: The hospitality sector contributes hugely to the British economy, with the hotel industry in particular a significant contributing factor. The growth of the hotel market over the last few years here, and indeed looking at what’s to come over the next couple of years, clearly demonstrates how important Britain, and London in particular, is a world class destination for leisure and business travellers.

“You also cannot deny that certain charm Britain has, which lends itself perfectly to hotels at the luxury end of the market.” – Robert Whitfield, Regional Director UK & General Manager of The Dorchester.

It makes sense, then, that some of the world’s most renowned luxury hotel brands are opening their doors in Britain. You also cannot deny that certain charm Britain has, which lends itself perfectly to hotels at the luxury end of the market – travellers are drawn to the rich history and heritage of a quintessentially British experience. Combine that with the fact that Britain occupies a vibrant position on the world stage and it’s a winning destination for the luxury traveller.

It is not just London at the forefront of luxury hospitality; across the country you have the best hotels in the world. Coworth Park in Ascot celebrates its 10 year anniversary this year and from the moment it opened became one of the world’s best country house hotels and remains at the top a decade later.

HK: How does The Dorchester differentiate luxury on the London hotel scene?

RW: There are many hotels that claim to provide the best in luxury, whether it’s the biggest pool, or most expensive wine list, but for The Dorchester our definition of luxury is: service. How do you feel when you come to stay with us? How can we go above and beyond what you were expecting? That is what is most important, everything else is just a given, and for us to be world leaders in service really is a testament our talented people.

HK: How has luxury changed since you started in hospitality?

RW: The biggest change has to be the level of competition, especially in London where all the global luxury players want to have a presence. And that’s a good thing. It has kept London’s hospitality scene at the top of its game.

Luxury used to be about the physical elements of a hotel. The décor, the facilities and this has evolved away from the material to the experiential. Personalised service and recognition is more valued. The guest is also more sophisticated and knowledgeable. Search engines allow access to so much information our team members need to stay up to date and have an intimate knowledge of the very best experiences that might appeal to our guests.

We look for ways to surprise and delight our guests with small and meaningful touches. Often, it is the small things that make all the difference.

“Before I started my role at Dorchester Collection I spent ten years at the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai in Hawaii, and prior to this I worked for the company in California and Nevis in the Caribbean.” – Robert Whitfield, Regional Director UK & General Manager of The Dorchester.

HK: How has travel enriched your life and made you into the hotelier you are today?

RW: I have been lucky enough to work in some of the most beautiful places in the world. Before I started my role at Dorchester Collection I spent ten years at the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai in Hawaii, and prior to this I worked for the company in California and Nevis in the Caribbean. Having that experience, learning how other countries approach service and operate day-to-day, has really helped inform my management style here in London. I was able to travel to a wide variety of locations from Bora Bora, to Bali, to Jackson Hole in Wyoming to the snowy peaks of Whistler.

I have developed an appreciation for different cultures and for diversity and the strength that this can bring to a business. It has also told me that service is about humility and caring for others. I am so proud to have worked with some extraordinary people who have shaped my career and taught me so much. Many lessons have come from my bosses, but also from the employees I have worked with.

HK: There has been a huge buzz around the re-launch of The Grill at The Dorchester. Why did you choose to relaunch?

RW: The Grill has been an integral part of The Dorchester since the opening in 1931, in order to keep the restaurant busy you need to ensure its identity and offering is relevant to your guests. We appointed Tom Booton, who happens to be our youngest ever head chef of The Grill, to lead the next chapter of the restaurant, supported by a fantastic team of fresh talent. The idea of creating an experience that would juxtaposition away from people’s  more traditional expectations of The Grill at The Dorchester was exciting and Tom was the perfect catalyst that made this come to life.

Image caption: Head chef of The Grill, Tom Booton and a few of his  special dishes on the new menu

Our aim was to create a more relaxed dining experience for guests through the development of new menus and a series of interior updates. The most prominent interior change is our statement ‘Pudding Bar’, which adds an element of theatre to the dining experience. Guests are invited to dine here for their final course to watch the pastry chefs in action.

HK: How will the newly adapted restaurant embrace the legacy of the 89-year-old hotel while also reflect the future of luxury F&B offerings?

RW: Our rich past matched with our ability to embrace ‘the new’ is deeply rooted in The Dorchester’s culture, and our guests are charmed by that.

At its core, The Dorchester has always been a hotel to celebrate. The new chapter of The Grill is no exception, and Tom’s dishes alone are a reason to come back to visit. Original features of the restaurant have remained, but new elements such as The Grill Bar, with a cocktail menu by award winning senior bartender Lucia Montanelli, and the Pudding Bar concept offer something new.

HK: You have, for the first time, a physical florist boutique within the hotel. Can you tell us more about this project?

RW: The Dorchester has become world-famous for its floral arrangements, all to the credit of our in-house designer florist Philip Hammond and his fantastic team. It is also a place of celebration. Guests come to celebrate, birthdays, anniversaries and all kinds of milestone moments in their lives. Flowers are a wonderful sign of celebration. We wanted to create a physical space where guests and visitors to the hotel could buy flowers and we found the perfect spot at the entrance to The Promenade.

Image caption: Philip Hammond, the Florist at The Dorchester

Image caption: Philip Hammond, the Florist at The Dorchester

We coincided the boutique opening with the launch of ‘The Dorchester Rose’, which is a really beautiful new variety of rose. The rose took seven years to make and was created by Meijer Roses, a family company with a long tradition of creating the highest quality roses who selected The Dorchester to carry the name of this new variety. The rose now fills the entirety of The Promenade and the colour is perfect to complement the interior tones of The Dorchester.

Main image credit: Dorchester Collection

F&B Special: Restaurants raising the bar in architecture & design

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
F&B Special: Restaurants raising the bar in architecture & design

Say farewell to conventional restaurants, and say hello to a delicious and enticing world of pure imagination to the latest design-led restaurants to open. Editor Hamish Kilburn writes… 

Ahead of next month, when Hotel Designs will take centre stage at Hospitality Restaurant Catering show, I have good reason to believe that some of the latest restaurants that have opened recently (in and out of the hotel industry) have changed the landscape of hospitality.

And while, some may argue that we should be cautious to focus the lens on purely the F&B scene in fear of losing purpose on other areas within the hotel, it is also an undeniable truth that the new era of international hotels are using their restaurants and bars to drive in a local crowd in order to make the public areas a vibrant hub of activity.

Therefore, here are just some of the latest restaurants and bars to open, which have been designed holistically to improve the overall guest experience.

Under, Europe’s first underwater restaurant

Located at the southernmost point of the Norwegian coastline, where the sea storms from the north and south meet, Europe’s first underwater restaurant is situated at a unique confluence. Marine species flourish here in the both briny and brackish waters to produce a natural abundance in biodiversity at the site. The Snøhetta-designed restaurant, which has just received a Michelin-star status, also functions as a research centre for marine life, providing a tribute to the wild fauna of the sea and to the rocky coastline of Norway’s southern tip.

The structure is designed to fully integrate into its marine environment over time, as the roughness of the concrete shell will function as an artificial reef, welcoming limpets and kelp to inhabit it. With the thick concrete walls lying against the craggy shoreline, the structure is built to withstand pressure and shock from the rugged sea conditions. Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive window offers a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.

“Under is a natural progression of our experimentation with boundaries, says Snøhetta Founder and Architect, Kjetil Trædal Thorsen. “As a new landmark for Southern Norway, Under proposes unexpected combinations of pronouns and prepositions, and challenges what determines a person’s physical placement in their environment. In this building, you may find yourself under water, over the seabed, between land and sea. This will offer you new perspectives and ways of seeing the world, both beyond and beneath the waterline”.

 Burbank Restaurant at Roomers Frankfurt

Burbank is a new design-led, Asian-fusion restaurant by leading chef, The Duc Ngo. It is situated within Frankfurt’s chic Design Hotels member, Roomers Frankfurt by the Gekko Group. The restaurant is the third partnership between Berlin culinary innovator, The Duc Ngo, and Gekko Group’s founders, Micky Rosen and Alex Urseanu. Burbank joins the group’s portfolio of leading destination restaurants including moriki Frankfurt, moriki Roomers Baden-Baden, and the Golden Phoenix at Provocateur Berlin Hotel. The Duc Ngo creates an inventive and unconventional menu at Burbank, fusing pan-Asian flavours with relaxed Californian and Latin American cooking. 

Beefbar restaurant, Le Coucou Hotel

Reviewed recently in Hotel Designs’ wider feature of Le Coucou Hotel, Beefbar restaurant is, like the rest of the property, sheltered within a unique design scheme. Pierre Yovanovitch, Wallpaper*’s Designer of the Year 2019, pulled out all the stops for this area, using it’s naturally striking vista as strong inspiration. The area is full of thoughtful nods to the hotel’s name, location and character of its owners. A wall of cuckoo clocks above the tables, for example, reflects the traditional decor of the region, and emoji-themed plates create humour in all the right places.

Hey Yo – Hong Kong

Think fresh, vibrant (and wear sunglasses) when stepping inside Hey Yo, which was a winner at the Bar and Restaurant Awards 2019. Inspired by the all the pastel colours of macaroons, the design team at Design Action & Associates took and adopted these colours in different areas of the shop, just like a pastry chef forming different shapes with flour and dough. The designer formed different shapes of design and furniture. Each arch window is painted with grey texture paint. The arch window on the front of the door, includes a bright neon sign which permeates the atmosphere. Beside the continuous arch windows, different colours of display shelves and display items are composed like a dream-like oil painting. Round countertops resemble Macaroons is in their unique hues, and chairs resemble coloured dough in contrast to shaped countertops.’

Wild Honey St James

black and white floors above striking chandeliers

Image credit: Sofitel London St James

Situated metres from The Mall in London, Sofitel London St James’ Wild Honey is a collaboration with renowned chef Anthony Demetre and a reimagination of his iconic restaurant concept. Located on the former site of the beloved bistro The Balcon, the dining room decor has been redesigned and refurbished by Jim Hamilton Design to echo its new direction.

Harlan & Holden Glasshouse Café

With biophilic design wrapping its branches around almost every sector, is it any wonder why design firm GamFratesi used nature as its primary inspiration in the creation of Harlan & Holden Glasshouse? We think not. The rehabilitative restaurant is inspired by a greenhouse. Breaking boundaries between interiors and exterior, the studio swapped windows for walls and used the surrounding landscape to create the space.

Main image credit: Under/Ivar Kvaal

Designing Beijing’s newest destination bar

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Designing Beijing’s newest destination bar

The social hotspot bar Union, which is sheltered in The Opposite House  has been inspired by simple elegance and seamless hospitality in mind…

The Opposite House has announced the launch of UNION – a bar exuding eleganceand comfort, the free spirit of an artist’s studio infused with hospitality that curates the guest’s experience. With a 20th century modernist sensibility, showcasing artwork and objects in an environment reminiscent of International Expos and drinks inspired by the ancient Silk Road, the space responds to the versatility ofguest’s needs through time.

UNION was designed by leading, New York-based design firm, AvroKO. Since its launch in 2001, AvroKO hasearned a reputation as one of the most innovative design firms in the field, due in large part to the group’sintegrated design process and focus on creating emotionally connected experiences. Seemingly whimsical in nature, UNION was strategically designed to have a clear social flow; copper architectural frames and metal mesh sheets showcase artwork, sculptures and objects, drawing in and engaging guests, whilst hidden elements such as the bar trolley, spicery wall and DJ booths enable a seamless transition from day to night.

Designed by AvroKO’s Bangkok studio, the interiors were inspired by potter, Lucie Rie’s, 20th century modernist studio – a beautiful, yet versatile, space that was suited to living, working and socialising. With the simple elegance of well-executed hospitality in mind, they created a space that enables exceptional levels of service and functionality, without compromising the guest experience.

UNION aims to create a sense of belonging and discovery, evoking the sense of witnessing something for the first time. A balance of ceremony and warmth create a personal, authentic experience, whilst a carefully curated soundtrack allows the bar to seamlessly transition through day to night with the perfect eclectic mix of tempo, BPM, energy levels and genres.

UNION offers a refined experience that celebrates the flavours, ingredients, customs and drinking traditions of the Silk Road. A sophisticated drinks menu consists of an extensive wine list made up of 60 bins that are all available by the glass as well as selection of signature cocktails and alcohol-free drinks. The wine list changes monthly and whilst it features some well-known wineries the list is carefully curated to provide representation for lesser known producers, hard to find bottles and biodynamic wines

As for the signature cocktail list, it encapsulates a diverse range of flavours inspired by international tastes; non-alcoholic creations include Spring breeze (a representation of Eastern Chinese flavours) which haspear, vanilla, coconut, citric acid and sea salt , whilst the traditional cocktail menu includes highlights such as Genghis Khan Martini (Mongolian representation) with French Gin, Mongolia Milk Wine, Dry Vermouth, Elderflower, Coconut and Sea Salt.

The Opposite House, located in the Sanlitun district is an intriguing urban hotel designed by eminent Japanese architect, Kengo Kuma. Its contemporary style and abundance of space perfectly complement the refreshingly individual service. More new spaces will be unveiled throughout the remainder of 2019.

Main image credit: The Opposite House

DesignLSM unveils 100 Queen’s Gate Hotel, Curio Collection by Hilton in London

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
DesignLSM unveils 100 Queen’s Gate Hotel, Curio Collection by Hilton in London

Hospitality design firm DesignLSM has transformed the F&B and front-of-house areas of the newly launched 100 Queen’s Gate Hotel in Kensington, London…

100 Queen’s Gate Hotel in Kensington has reopened following Crimson Hotel’s ambition to convert the DoubleTree property into a Curio by Hilton hotel.

To achieve this, design firm DesignLSM was commissioned to curate a unique narrative for the property, forming a personality that creates a strong sense of place. From the outset of the project, DesignLSM strategy team collaborated closely with the client on the positioning of the hotel, undertaking a detailed reconnaissance visit of the Kensington Borough and examining among other areas the core demographics and competition. The study established the overarching design narrative as well as defining the F&B offers to suit the day part and clientele’s diverse desires.

“We immersed ourselves into the historical archives of the property and drew upon the distinctive persona of the original land owner – William Henry Alexander, who was well regarded within the 1800’s for being an avid collector of curiosities from his travels as well as a notable patron of the arts,” said DesignLSM’s strategy director, Holly Hallam. “We wanted to ensure that the interior alluded to its Victorian roots whilst conveying a strong balance of modernity. The narrative of the design pays homage to William Alexander, creating a sense of ‘his residence’ through the individually designed spaces; showcasing the collectables and celebrating his adventurous character.”

warm and spacious public areas with plush furniture

Image credit: Curio Collection by Hilton

The heterogeneous and contemporary palette of the hotel reception and lounge creates a warm and inviting ambience for guests introducing them into the luxury of the Curio brand. The two main lounge areas are divided by a beautifully lit cabinet of curiosities displaying an assortment of discoveries which reflect the origins of William Alexander’s travels. Reminiscent of a Victorian gentleman’s drawing room the space features a grand bookcase, writing desk and drinks trolley alongside plush furnishings and artwork.

The large, light and airy reception area creates a distinctive first impression with three bespoke timber reception desks taking centre stage. Further pockets of lounge seating are placed around the space leading out to a relaxed atrium terrace that takes guests down to the ESQ cocktail bar.

Deep, dark hues in the bar

Image credit: Curio Collection by Hilton

The design curation of the ESQ Bar was based around a traditional Victorian parlour room, where Alexander would bring his guests and business associates to discuss his latest confidential endeavours. Adorned in a rich, warm colour palette with bold decorative fabrics the space provides a refined and relaxed ambience perfect for pre and post dinner drinks. Ambient lighting seamlessly transitions from day till night in keeping with the sophisticated tone of the hotel.

The lower ground floor also offers access to two private meeting rooms decorated in a deep hues of blue and dark wood projecting a masculine undertone with curious collections of artwork and relics.

Taking inspiration from traditional Victorian Gymnasiums, the intimate basement gym is adorned in bold painted wall panelling with warm timber flooring complemented by a statement green colour palette.

Elsewhere, the ‘Botanica’ tea room is housed in an elegant double height atrium space with abundant arrays of luxurious greenery and planting. Evocative of a classic Victorian orangery, the space offers vast amounts of natural daylight making it the perfect place for relaxation over a spot of afternoon tea with friends.

A particular highlight of the design, according to the design firm, is the exquisite pendant lighting that imposingly suspends from the ceiling, highlighting the elegant marble finishes and statement floor tiles.

New destination bar opens at revamped Hilton Hotel Münich City

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
New destination bar opens at revamped Hilton Hotel Münich City

While Hotel Designs continues its Spotlight On Bars & Restaurants, Hilton Hotel Münich City opens Juliet Rose, a new destination bar…

Interior design firm Goddard Littlefair has completed a striking new destination bar called Juliet Rose at the Hilton Hotel Münich City. The city’s new place-to-be bar was inspired by the F&B concept of unusual botanical extracts and the importance of process in the creation of its singular drinks.

The scheme was inspired by the F&B concept of unusual botanical extracts and the importance of process in the creation of its singular drinks, which includes a range of signature cocktails and what is said to be the best coffee in Munich. The result is an exciting and theatrical zoned space with an alchemical, laboratory feel; a perfect back-drop for outstanding drinks to be made and delivered. The scheme both stands out from and also works subtly in harmony with the overall hotel, which has also undergone a thorough revamp by the Goddard Littlefair team.

The bar’s name, Juliet Rose, is taken from one of the most elite roses in the world, developed over a 15-year period by renowned rose breeder David Austin. As well as lending the concept connotations of craftsmanship and the long-term pursuit of perfection, the ‘Rose’ reference will also be easily understood by a local audience as a nod to Rosenheimer Strasse, the street onto which the bar’s dedicated entrance faces, as well as the Rosenheimer Platz metro station, on top of which the hotel stands.

Modern restaurant and bar

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

The generously-apportioned, 90-seat, 180 sq m bar is located on the hotel’s ground floor, with easy access from both the hotel’s spacious new reception, as well as via its own dedicated Rosenheimer Strasse entrance, introduced to maximise passing trade. Customers can additionally access the hotel and bar directly from the metro station and an adjacent car park below, arriving via a special circulation route through the ground floor of the hotel, offering intriguing glimpses of the back of the bar through semi-opaque windows, so that the bar is referenced and announced from every possible angle.

Juliet Rose is made up of four different seating zones, each with different stand-out features, plus two bars. The main ‘ceremony bar’ is a stunning, monolithic U-shaped design that guests coming from the hotel entrance see as soon as they enter the space, at the far end of a central approach. A second, smaller-scale coffee bar is made of the same dramatic moss-green and highly-polished granite, with the choice of material referencing the earthiness of botanical ingredients. The granite for the main bar has been book-matched to ensure dramatic textural veining from the front. Above and behind the main bar, the gantry structure is made up of brass sections, with an industrial/lab feel, underscored by an apothecary-style bottle display. The barman prepares cocktails at its centre, making full use of dry ice, bell jars and a sense of reveal.

‘The overall design approach for the space was based on form and order, with drama, freedom and an opposing sense of randomness created by the furniture and accessorising’, architect David Lee Hood, Associate at Goddard Littlefair, explained. ‘When it came to structure, we added a number of new elements to the space to give a feeling of overall order and symmetry, whilst also ensuring playful visibility between zones via glazed screens offering varying privacy levels.’

As visitors arrive from the hotel down the entry circulation route for example, they pass between two large-scale, floor-to-ceiling screens (with added ‘peep holes’), where a brass-effect structure features ribbed glass OLED panels with a striking inset palm print. The screens were bespoke-manufactured for the project and are just one of many bespoke items that ensure design integrity and exclusivity for the project. A second highly striking screen-wall faces the hotel entrance lobby, passed by guests on their way to either the bar or front reception, and is made up of a brass shelving structure with glass backlit panels where a textured opaque manifestation gives the impression of a linen-style finish and plays with light. The structure is decorated on the inner side with judiciously-placed planting.

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

As the existing columns in the space are quite dominant, the design team made a feature of them by using new cladding and mirroring. An existing ceiling was removed so that the space’s full height could be used, with a dramatic new lighting structure that uses brass pipes and large, exposed lamps to add to the geometric, laboratory feel. Inset mirrors within the ceiling area reinforce the structure, as well as adding reflection and sparkle. Architectural lighting for the scheme was created together with DPA Lighting, whilst the stand-out decorative pieces were all bespoke-designed by Goddard Littlefair, with advice from DPA, and manufactured by Peters Design. As well as the overhead grid structure, these include a stand-out ‘test tube’ style pendant light located over the main bar and a number of vertical, glass-clad wall lights, which refer to the test-tube decorative light in style. A number of mid-wall lights throughout feature a circular fitting with a pole attachment to each side. These add layering and create a lower-level light source to bring light to the tables. Flooring throughout features stained oak timber surround and inset panels, made up of a geometric pattern of small white mosaic areas, plus larger slices set at interesting angles.

The four main seating zones include a casual drop-in area, directly to the left of the entrance, primarily for daytime use for coffee and cakes. Further casual seating is to the right, whilst the two sections further back and along both sides of the bar, for day or evening use, feature a mixture of seating types, as well as a communal high table, for groups, cocktails evenings and special events. Planting is used throughout, both for biophilic appeal and to underline the ‘botanical ingredients’ bar concept.

Furniture throughout includes sofas in bottle green leather and loose seating upholstered in pale oyster pink or else in deep orange leather with thin brass upstands and dark turquoise seat backs. Tables are either a marble-effect silestone, a brass-edged timber-topped design or, for the higher communal table, a series of easily-conjoined tables featuring a print taken from a magnified gold-veined leaf print, supplied by Fameed Khalique and manufactured by the lead contractor on the scheme, Engels.

luxurious bar with pendent lighting

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Four windows which look directly out onto Rosenheimer Strasse, alongside the bar, feature a special chain-mail curtain with a clip detail, playing once again with light and screening, whilst effectively obscuring the busy street view and ensuring customers are enveloped by the bar’s atmosphere.

Located behind the street entrance to the bar, on the other side of a draft lobby area, are two stand-out pieces of bespoke-designed joinery: a waiter station and a moveable cocktail bar, both in high-gloss lacquer with blue-green tones to work well with the planting and moss-green granite bars. The cocktail bar has a removable top with ice and a sink inside so that it can be moved around to cater to guests anywhere in the space.

The hotel reception lobby that connects with the bar features a design treatment in keeping with the overall hotel design scheme, inspired by German Expressionism and particularly Der Blaue Reiter art movement, which had its origins in the city. Stand-out design features in the reception area include feature lighting loops, designed by Goddard Littlefair and manufactured by LED-C4; a high-gloss hexagonal mosaic-fronted reception desk with brass edging; a striking reception back-wall with a pale grey wallcovering and bronze effect vertical dividing strips; a marble fireplace area and artworks chosen by art consultants ARTIQ, taking a cue from the dynamism and strong colour of early 20th century German Expressionism, but updating that for today’s context, with new artworks commissioned for the hotel from contemporary artists. The artworks that lead towards Juliet Rose are partly-abstracted paintings which reference a more natural theme, in keeping with the F&B concept, with bold and interplaying curved lines.

Main image credit: Gareth Gardner

SPOTLIGHT ON: 10 inspirational hotel bars and restaurants

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
SPOTLIGHT ON: 10 inspirational hotel bars and restaurants

To kickstart our Spotlight On topic of Bars & Restaurants, Hotel Designs has scoured the globe to highlight hotel F&B gems that deserve to be recognised. Editor Hamish Kilburn edits…

In 2018, according to Technomic, overall consumer spending for hotel food and beverage showed a solid 5.5 percent annual growth since 2011. In design, architecture and in service, there is a clear move to produce instagrammable F&B areas.

While the overall dining and drinking experience is becoming somewhat of a theatrical performance, we have identified 10 hotels going above and beyond – in both design and service – to ensure that they are entertaining their customers’ ever-evolving demands.

Joali – Mura Bar (Maldives)

Beach blue wallcovering with wooden roof

Image credit: Joali – Mura Bar

Overlooking a pearly beach and pool that meets the sea, The Mura Bar is designed to encourage guests to naturally relax and unwind. The hotel’s entire construction was designed to build around its natural landscape. As a result, 1,000 trees were preserved in the process, creating luscious green scenes in a natural paradise.

Gleneagles – The American Bar (Scotland)

close up of plush light blue seating

Image credit: Gleneagles

With the aim to bring back the glamour and decadence of fine dining experiences of the 1920s and ’30s and redesign a legend, Gleneagles will in May 2019 unveil the relaunch of its famous restaurant, The Strathearn following a design transformation by Ennismore Design Studio.

Conrad Malives Ranhgali Island – Ithaa Undersea Restaurant (The Maldives)

The awarding winning underwater Ithaa sits five metres below the surface, offering 180-degree panoramic views of the vibrant coral gardens surrounding it. Ithaa (meaning ‘mother of pearl’ in the Maldivian language of Dhivehi) serves contemporary European cuisine in a six-course set dinner menu.

Since its opening in 2015, the restaurant has become an Instagram sensation and its popularity led to the concept of opening the world’s first underwater hotel suite.

Hotel Gotham, Manchester – Club Brass (United Kingdom)

Image credit: Hotel Gotham

Poised to become the backdrop of Hotel Designs’ Meet Up North, Manchester’s Hotel Gotham, which opened in 2015 – read full review here, has been a major catalyst that has crowned the northern metropolis a major hot spot for hotel design and development. The jewel within the crown is located on the rooftop, at Club Brass.

Leading designers, architects, hoteliers and key-industry suppliers are expected to gather at the hotel’s exclusive members-only rooftop bar, Club Brass, for drinks and canapés above the city on July 1 for Meet Up North. Click here to purchase your exclusive ticket

Peninsula Paris – The Rooftop Bar (France)

Paris rooftop bar with curved windows overlooking a model plane

Image credit: Peninsula Hotels

Located on the sixth floor of The Peninsula Paris – and offering unparalleled views over the city – sits L’Oiseau Blanc, one of the most elegant and singular restaurants in Paris. The aviation-themed interior celebrates flying aces Charles Nungesser and François Coli who attempted to cross the Atlantic in 1927 from Le Bourget.

The Moxy, Chelsea (USA)

Dark-lit, open-planned room with lavish bar

Image caption/credit: The Fleur Room | Moxy Hotels/ Marriott International

Located on the 35th floor, the intimate rooftop bar, The Fleur Room, is open to hotel guests and locals alike. The alluring glow of light and color birth a heightened space of intimacy and mystery. The sofa material is embedded with a floral design and the bronzed furniture surfaces are smooth and polished. “Sink back into the comfortable couches and let your eyes settle on an incredible view of one of New York’s most recognizable charms – the Empire State building,” suggests journalist Hannah Kaplan who checked in to review the the kid on the block for Hotel Designs last week. Read the full review of the hotel here.

Soho House Istanbul – Club Bar (Turkey)

Refined interiors in a modern bar that is sheltered in a heritage building with bold lighting

Image credit: Soho House Istanbul, Club Bar

Sheltered within a striking 19th century mansion, which was originally designed for a Genoese merchant before becoming the US embassy for most of the 20th century. The Club Bar  is an oasis of calm, featuring decadent wallcoverings that are balanced with plush bar seating and thoughfully designed break-out areas.

Zuri Zanzibar – The Upendo Restaurant (Tanzania)

Sustainable materials - including furniture and lighting - make up the raw and rustic restaurant

Image credit: Zuri Zanzibar

Designed by Jestico + Whiles, the eco hotel’s Upendo Restaurant overlooks the entire resort. The restaurant’s laid-back Zanzibari style and live cooking shows make it the ideal place for breakfast and dinner, whilst its separate deck is ideal for private events or larger dinner groups. Peponi bar in the Zuri Zanzibar offers comfortable benches and sofas for a peaceful and relaxing ambiance.

Raffles – The Long Bar (Singapore)

Exterior of the hotel

Image credit: Raffles

Redesigned by Alexandra Champalimaud, the earthy decor of the two-storey Long Bar which will reopen this summer is inspired by Malayan life in the 1920s. The deep, rich colours and lush greenery transport patrons to the edge of a tropical plantation. In keeping with the relaxed atmosphere, guests are invited to brush peanut shells off the table and bar counter to the floor. In addition, and arguably thus making the hotel one of the early innovators for encouraging bar theatre, The Long Bar is quite possibly the only place in Singapore where littering is encouraged.

The Morpheus (China)

The sky bar, with sophisticated gold barriers between tables

Image credit: Melco Resorts & Entertainment

Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, Yí on the 21st-floor Sky Bridge at The Morpheus takes fine dining to new heights with a unique blend of regional Chinese cuisine served in tasting menu format. Yí is the first Chinese restaurant in Macau offering daily multi-course tasting menus.

Main image credit: Moxy Chelsea, New York

LIVE FROM MILAN: Inside Tom Dixon’s new restaurant and showroom

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
LIVE FROM MILAN: Inside Tom Dixon’s new restaurant and showroom

British designer Tom Dixon has gone beyond the exhibition hall at Milan Design Week by unveiling his latest collection of products in the studio’s new permanent restaurant… 

After five years of exhibiting in the traditional way during Milan Design Week, British design studio Tom Dixon has opened a new restaurant and showroom called The Manzoni in Milan to display his latest collection.

The new space has pre-opened and will reopen after the show as a permanent epicentre for guests to view the studio’s latest lighting, furniture and accessories collections.

Aptly named The Manzoni after the Italian novelist Alessandro Manzoni, the new 100-cover restaurant has been created by Dixon’s Design Research Studio.”With the city being so active and engaging right now, it is the right time to forget being temporary and build something permanent,” said Dixon. “Just like in London, we don’t think it’s enough to just have a showroom. We need a place where people slow down and experience our products in a live setting.”

Operating as the designer intends his products to be promoted – by being used and handled – The Manzoni is a living and breathing showroom and restaurant, which will be styled in true Tom Dixon style – think reimagined simple shapes, clean and crisp colours and even an immersive green jungle.

“The Manzoni is more than a restaurant,” says Dixon, “It is also an experimental space, a theatrical backdrop.” The concept was created so that guests to the restaurant can browse before they dine while showroom visitors can grab a bite to eat before of after browsing the latest products within the season’s collection. Visitors to both the restaurant and the showroom will be able to see the studio’s products in an active context.

Main image credit: Tom Dixon Studio/The Manzoni

B3 Designers breathes new American life into Marriott Hotel’s champions bar in Frankfurt

Hamish Kilburn

B3 Designers, which has gone from strength to strength since launching in 2002, has unveiled its latest project, which captures a little bit of America into the F&B areas of Frankfurt’s Marriott hotel…

Restaurant and hotel interior design specialist, B3 Designers has recently unveiled its latest interior design and branding project. Champions Bar & Restaurant, located within Frankfurt’s Marriott hotel, is a European sports bar and restaurant serving classic bar dishes and drinks in the German city’s central district of Innenstadt.

The previous bar and restaurant, with its all-American theme, had been an iconic destination in Frankfurt for decades. Marriott’s design brief to B3 for the refurbished 220-cover bar and restaurant was to work around the themes of its history and heritage, sports, burgers and beer, to create a space where guests can enjoy themselves in a casual and relaxed environment. To bring this brief to life, B3 Designers has developed a design that completely celebrates a nostalgic, vintage European sports bar.

The heritage look-and-feel is woven throughout, starting gently at the entrance door inside, with a vintage trophy display. Once inside, the large bar featuring fluted timber, sits centre backed by a wooden menu display with old-school scoreboard-styled lettering. The furniture includes a mixture of high-bar seating and long communal oak timber tables with bench seats, and in the lower dining area is a mix of full-length curved booth seating, leather-upholstered banquettes with high back rests, and lower-level tables and chairs.

The abundant use of natural materials, rich tones and the darker colour scheme evokes a masculine, warm and comfortable vibe. The use of copper finishes on the bar’s countertop and beer taps is a nod to the traditional brewery tanks widely used in beer production. While black-and-white chequered tiling in the raised bar area and diamond-motif upholstery pay homage to the traditional football and referees kit. And the slatted timber booth seating evokes stadia-seating of a bygone era. Olympics and other sports-themed artwork and paraphernalia such as vintage footballs and boots, boxing gloves and bags, tennis rackets and photographs are scattered tastefully throughout the space.

One of the design challenges was working the 12 HD large projector screens into the design, and, more specifically, making sure they didn’t detract from the ambience during times when sports events are not being broadcast. B3 Designers has ensured the overhead screens are concealed discreetly above when not in use, and drop via a central motorised system, allowing the space to function as a standalone restaurant. Yet, during sports broadcasts, these screens play an important role in creating a premium seating sports experience around the restaurant.

Designing an optimised hotel dining space

Hamish Kilburn

Sophie Armstrong from Burlington Granite explains how to create a warm, inviting and practical hotel dining experience… 

As the place your guests start each day, the dining room is the heart and soul of any hotel, playing a pivotal role in the overall guest experience. As such, optimising your hotel dining room for efficiency, aestheticism and functionality can have a significantly positive impact on business. So today, we’ll break down exactly how you can achieve this in your hotel, ensuring your guests leave breakfast, lunch or dinner with a full stomach and a smile.

Consider your room layout

The floorplan is the fundamental principle to be considered when optimising any hotel dining space, as it ultimately affects the entire dining experience.

Although the utilisation of a multi-room layout may seem like a great way to accommodate extra guests, a singular open-room layout is our top pick for your floor space plan. Not only does it make life easier for your servers, but it often generates a better atmosphere that really gives your hotel dining space life.

“When considering what dining furniture best suits your hotel dining space, reflect on what type of establishment you’re running.”

If you offer a continental breakfast service, ensure your counter is central to the overall floor plan to create an easy self-service experience. Use a durable granite worktop surface to keep your dining room looking contemporary and clean, while simultaneously providing a simple and hassle-free clean-up once breakfast is done.

If your dining room has a bar, make sure this is set aside from the hustle and bustle of service. This will accommodate those guests who simply want to relax with a drink, ensuring they still have an enjoyable experience regardless of the space’s primary purpose, and perhaps enticing them to stay for another one – or three!

Choose the furniture that reflects your brand

When considering what dining furniture best suits your hotel dining space, reflect on what type of establishment you’re running – are you offering a fine dining or casual dining experience? Purchase your furniture accordingly, ensuring you buy commercially regardless of service type to guarantee furniture that can withstand the wear and tear of everyday use.

Choose materials that match the colour and patterns of your interior decor to maintain consistent branding from the bedrooms to the bar and dining room, ensuring that the fabrics are stain-resistant and can easily be wiped down and cleaned for quality sanitation. Striking the balance between branding and practicality is crucial here, so ensure you don’t sacrifice one for the other.

Consider logistics

You have plenty of options when it comes to shapes and sizes of furniture, so it’s important to carefully consider what options work best for your space. First, you should think about the kinds of guest that you accommodate at your hotel. If your clientele is primarily families, you’ll need a range of different sized tables so they have plenty of choices; provide tables with four, six and eight seats so that groups have options. Alternatively, if your lobby sees many business travellers, then opt for mostly two-seaters with some larger tables for the groups that do come through.

For breakfast, think about incorporating round tables into your dining room layout to encourage socialising during the morning rush. During the evening, square tables work best for space-efficiency and table turnover. Ultimately, though, it’s a good idea to mix table sizes to ensure you can cater for everyone, from the lone guest to the large family, with plenty of two-person tables to easily shift around table layouts when required.

By optimising your hotel dining space, you’ll improve the experience of your guests and, as a result, boost the profits of your business by creating repeat custom. Following this advice will help will help you create the best hotel dining space for guests to enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner every day.

 

Interior of the restuarant

Indoor-outdoor restaurant experience to open in luxury hotel in Chester, England

800 534 Hamish Kilburn

Palm Court Restaurant, Bar & Piano Lounge will open in to Chester’s Grosvenor Pulford Hotel & Spa this month…

A dining experience with a difference will be unveiled in Chester’s Grosvenor Pulford Hotel & Spa this month with the opening of Palm Court Restaurant, Bar & Piano Lounge.

Nelson Hotels have opened the multi-purpose dining venue with the aim to meet all needs of hotel guests, local residents, and visitors to the area. “We identified the need for a restaurant which would be suitable for all occasions and all guests,” said Harold Nelson, Chairman of Nelson Hotels. “Our vision was to create more than just a restaurant and so Palm Court will cater throughout the day and appeal to all dining requirements from casual to special occasion.”

The £1.5 million dining venue has been designed by award-winning interior design consultancy Lister Carter. With an impressive glass ceiling, the space has taken inspiration from a Victorian Palm House, bursting with the greenery of the Kentia Palm tree. The intimate restaurant and bar blends exposed industrial style metalwork and brickwork with luxurious crystal chandeliers, antique mirrors and bronze fretwork. The exposed steel, aged glass and bronze artwork lends itself to a warm but stripped back feel. A mix of marble and wood tables, comfortable leather and velvet chairs and plush sofas offers the customer a sumptuous experience whether it be morning coffee or evening cocktails.

One of the main focal points of Palm Court is a black Yamaha baby grand piano set amidst bubbling fountains and lush palm trees. As well as being the highest quality acoustic piano, it is a famed entertainment piano which boasts thousands of self-playing songs, so even without the pianist it will be music for the ears.

Dining experience

Palm Court is also home to an exclusive wine cave with floor to ceiling wine racks showcasing Laurent Perrier Champagnes and housing almost 100 different varieties of old and new world wines and Champagnes along with specially selected, fine cellar wines. Mirrored walls and a crystal seed chandelier give a luxurious, chic feel. With a poser table seating up to six people, the wine cave will be used for wine tastings and exclusive private dining.

New London hotel restaurant: Hans’ Bar & Grill unveiled at 11 Cadogan Gardens

800 534 Hamish Kilburn

The new restaurant, located in the heart of London’s Chelsea district, is Goddard Littlefair’s first London restaurant project…

Hans’ Bar & Grill, a new west London neighbourhood restaurant in Chelsea’s Pavilion Road, has opened. The new striking and contemporary interiors scheme, created by leading hospitality and F&B designers Goddard Littlefair, includes an exciting new extended café-bar space and a new restaurant, which plays on the concept of indoor outdoor dining.

Hans’ Bar & Grill was named in honour of Cadogan family ascendant Sir Hans Sloane, one-time physician to the royal family and President of The Royal Society, as well a celebrated natural historian, whose incredible collection of specimens and artefacts led to the founding of The British Museum. Both London’s Sloane Square and Sloane Street were named in his honour.

The new 106-cover restaurant encompasses 18 covers within the café-bar area, directly inside the Pavilion Road entrance; 46 covers in a covered courtyard area, forming part of the main restaurant, plus a further 42 covers in the dining area of the main hotel building. A further private dining space, ‘The Curio’, inspired by Sloane’s love of adventure and discovery, can seat a further 16 guests and is located directly opposite the internal restaurant entrance.

“We’re very excited about the opening of our first London restaurant project”, Goddard Littlefair Co-founder and Director Jo Littlefair commented. “As a design studio, we’ve built an extensive portfolio of residential developments in London and an extensive portfolio of hospitality projects outside the capital, so it’s great now to have a completed restaurant project in the same city we work, eat and play in – and also to have been able to do it for such a prestigious client and in such a great location.”

 The final area of the restaurant is in the main hotel building

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

The first café-bar space is located within a converted former mews garage on Pavilion Road, where it sits alongside other converted garages to either side to form a new suite of upmarket, independent boutique retailers, from barbers and cheesemongers to specialist purveyors of wine and bread. Architectural works on this, as well as the courtyard refurbishment, were carried out by ReardonSmith Architects.

Design walk-through

The Pavilion Road entrance features glazing to either side and a black-painted timber surround. The interior design firm created all signage for the venue, applying new branding by Doodle, which includes fascia and projecting signs, as well as wayfinding, menu A-boards and external menu boxes.  The signage creates a discreet balance between the hotel’s traditional heritage positioning and the more contemporary styling of the restaurant.

The bright and airy café-bar space has a clean and contemporary feel with a monochrome colourway, along with interesting, textured finishes, such as white slatted timber wall cladding and an original, exposed, yellow-stock brick wall to the left, plus white tiling behind the bar, where vertically stack-bonded Solus Ceramics tiles create a great hand-crafted feel. The bespoke feature bar front is in split-faced stone from Stone Republic, with a natural, honed grey basalt bar top from Natural Stone Projects providing a clean contrast.

The furniture in this area is in butchers block oak and includes bespoke banquettes upholstered in pre-aged tan leather, designed by Goddard Littlefair, manufactured by Craftwood and located along the left-hand, exposed-brick wall. Cadogan family portraits, specially created for the space by artist Louise Seabrook, also line the left-hand brick wall. Hints of brass in this area – used, for example, as frame-lining within the bespoke glass and black-finish metal screens – link the space to the restaurant beyond, where brass is much more predominant, proportionally inverting the initial relationship of brass and black metal in this space.

The ceiling is exposed and painted light grey, with architectural lighting on tracks, whilst feature lighting includes five industrial-feel brass wall lights from Istanbul-based Topos Workshop along the left-side brick wall, plus seven Nordlux Strap Pendant lights over the bar, which hang on leather straps.

The flooring directly surrounding the bar is in a patterned ceramic tile from Royal Mosa in a bespoke mix of four different but complementary tones, ranging from cream through to chocolate, whilst the main flooring, also used on the stairs and in the former courtyard area, is a cobble grey FSC-certified brushed oak from the Solid Wood Flooring Company. Full-height glass and metal screens in black steel and brass, situated to either side of the steps leading down to the former courtyard area, provide drama and smooth the transition to the next part of the space.

The first courtyard section of the restaurant is filled with natural light, thanks to two large-scale feature rooflights, from which green and black blown-glass Amp pendants by Holloways of Ludlow hang, interspersed with bespoke spun-brass bowls full of natural planting. This subtle nature theme extends into the main restaurant area and café bar, where small pots feature throughout on the waiter stations and along the back bar.

The first section of the restaurant in the former open courtyard space

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

The restaurant has a contemporary classic feel, with traditional wood panelling to the walls in a fresh and light grey paint finish (alternating with antiqued bevelled glass panels), plus skirting and a dado rail, as well as restored fireplaces, linking it in feel to the overall hotel, which Goddard Littlefair has also revamped. This space features a furniture mix of dark green banquettes with a fluted leather finish, whilst all loose furniture, similarly bespoke-made for the project, is in grey leather or else a mix of mohair and leather in light green or dusky orange, with dark timber frames.

Joinery, including waiter stations and ambient wine displays, is in smoked, charcoal-stained oak and is darker-toned to create contrast. Restaurant tables feature smoked charcoal timber tops and brass surrounds, whilst those in the central section beneath the skylights have white Carrera marble tops to reflect the light.

Approximately half of the restaurant space beyond the courtyard is an area that can be separated off, via curtains in a striking House of Hackney floral fabric, for private hire. This 22-cover space hosts a striking, illuminated wall display of 300 wine bottles and is in a moodier dark green colourway than the rest of the restaurant, specially-designed to set off the display, with green walls, a green fireplace and green banquette chairs, with a pop of orange for contrast in the form of a number of orange-upholstered mohair chairs with leather backs and bases.

Bespoke, shallow brushed brass chandeliers, custom-made for the project by Northern Lights, add glamour, with one situated in the wine room and the other in the rear restaurant section that follows and completes the scheme. The rear section is also the indoor restaurant entrance area for guests coming from the hotel side. A pendant light over a six-seater booth here is the Gubi Multi-Lite Pendant in brushed brass. Art in this area of the restaurant is inspired by Sir Hans Sloane and includes a series of tropical birds, flowers and feathers, painted by artist Rebecca Jewell and curated by art consultants ARTIQ, hung either in ‘salon-hang’ clusters or as facing standalone pieces in the booth seats. Picture lights are from Vaughan Designs.

Outside of the main restaurant and directly opposite is the 16-cover Curio space, with another space alongside, The Curio Lounge, which can be used for breakfast overspill or for a further 10 covers.

Restaurant General Manager, Simon Smith (previously of Berners Tavern and Hakkasan) will oversee the wine list, which will feature over 195 BINS with a focus on unique and quirky bottles from around the world, whilst a concise list of classic cocktails designed by Salvatore Damiano, using British spirits, which will include a twist on a Gin Sour and the British Mule.

“We want Hans’ Bar & Grill to be a real neighbourhood spot – a place people feel just as comfortable popping in for a drink and a salad for lunch, or for a special occasion with friends’, commented Restaurant General Manager Simon Smith.

“We are exceptionally pleased with the work Goddard Littlefair have done to create what is quickly becoming a favoured restaurant in Chelsea. Their design has utilised the space tremendously well and the aesthetic intricacies compliment the quirky nature of 11 Cadogan Gardens. Furthermore, their understanding of hotel and restaurant operations is of great benefit to the various roles an all-day dining restaurant has to play,” added Soliman Khaddour, General Manager of 11 Cadogan Gardens.

Supplier list:

Lighting: Vaughan DesignsNorthern LightsHolloways of LudlowNordlux Strap PendantGubi
Branding: Doodle
Surfaces: Topos WorkshopRoyal MosaNatural Stone ProjectsSolid Wood Flooring Company,
Art: Louise SeabrookRebecca JewellARTIQ,
Furniture: Craftwood,

All images: Gareth Gardner

Lodore Falls Hotel unveils new restaurant as part of £10m renovation

640 427 Hamish Kilburn

Lodore Falls Hotel, part of the Lake District Hotels group, has announced the launch of its new 70-seater Pan Asian restaurant, Mizu

Taking its name from the Japanese for ‘falling water’, Mizu occupies a prime and appropriate spot, directly overlooking the stunning Lodore Falls waterfall.

Becoming the hotel’s second restaurant, Mizu reflects a relaxed ambiance with cool, elemental colours, floor-to-ceiling windows coupled with natural textures and materials.

Leading the interior design project was Ashleigh Doherty from Greyline Design. She said: “Mizu took inspiration from the local colour palette of warm green hues mixed with timber elements reflecting the surrounding woods. A modern feeling has been retained with contrasting concrete tiling, glazed bar front and a beautiful geometric floor. We have tried to honour the clients own heritage with Scandinavian style furniture upholstered in rich, tweed fabrics bringing warmth and texture to the restaurant.  A lounge area was added with luxurious deep buttoned leather sofas and comfortable chairs. Feature pendant and wall lights enhance warmth, creating a comfortable and relaxing atmosphere.”

Scheduled to launch mid May, the new restaurant’s open kitchen allows for guests to watch talented head chef Kasun Jayasooriya as he serves up a fusion of Asian dishes.

Marketing Director of Lake District Hotels, Daniella Hope, said: “We are delighted to have made recent investment, such as refurbishing our public areas, developing new larger, luxurious bedroom suites and now with the creation and launch of Mizu restaurant. The stunning natural beauty of the Lake District makes it a competitive market place but we at Lodore Falls Hotel are confident that we offer something uniquely exciting.”

The hotel’s overall investment is £10 million, with phase one now complete and saw the refurbishment of the hotel’s entire ground floor. Phase two sees the opening of Mizu restaurant and four spacious bedroom suites. As well as a further 14 bedroom suites and the much anticipated, The Falls Spa will launch during mid September 2018.

lakedistricthotels.net/lodorefalls

bar at the entrance of Doc Cheng's restaurant, Raffles Hotel, Singapore

SPOTLIGHT ON: Bars, Restaurants & Catering

1024 686 Katy Phillips

Throughout May Hotel Designs will focus on two essential components to a hotel’s make up – bars & restaurants and catering equipment…

If you want to get your company and products in front of an audience of interior designers, procurement specialists and hoteliers for a month of specially focussed commentary, this is a fantastic opportunity.

HOTELS NEED TO MAKE THEIR SOCIAL SPACES ‘DESTINATIONS’

With so many bars and restaurants in existence these days, how does a hotel bar or restaurant keep its guests from straying elsewhere as well as attracting non-residents through its doors? The answer is through its design and the atmosphere that design creates. Customers of all ages need to feel excited, stimulated and comfortable – getting the style of a hotel restaurant, bar or café right is vital, will it disrupt staff workflow? How do safety regulations come into the design process?

Ultimately a hotel bar or restaurant can be a key driver in enticing new customers, make a significant contribution to the hotels revenue and support overarching brand values. This month, we look at some of the best examples in the world right now.

OFFER A FOOD EXPERIENCE LIKE NO OTHER

Food matters – fact. By making your menus current, different and unique, you will entice your guests. Restaurant and bar aesthetics aside, you have to make an impression with what is on the plates you serve.

Current trends see locally sourced produce a key component whilst the look of the food it just as fundamental – sharing food pictures socially is huge and for an hotelier, an opportunity to maximise on free advertising. In order to get food to the table, hoteliers have to have the very best equipment and tools for their staff. We will be focussing on the behind-the-scenes of hospitality equipment – one of the biggest sectors in the industry – from the best equipment to regulations, and best practice.

There are plenty of ways you can get involved with these features, from supplying an opinion piece to working with us on a targeted mini-series.

If you wish to find out more, please contact Jennie Lane on 01992 374098 or j.lane@forumevents.co.uk

 

Image supplied by William Cho

Ritz-Carlton, Abama will re-open its much-loved ‘Verona’ next month, unveiling extensive expansion and a significant renovation of the classic Italian hotspot

Ritz-Carlton, Abama celebrates re-opening of Verona restaurant

1000 667 Daniel Fountain

The Ritz-Carlton, Abama will re-open its much-loved ‘Verona’ next month, unveiling extensive expansion and a significant renovation of the classic Italian hotspot.

The re-launch will see Verona welcome its guests to increased dining space and a chic new-look. Marking the leading European destination’s continued commitment to excellence, the new venue forms part of the resort’s gastronomic stable of ten restaurants.

Ritz-Carlton, Abama celebrates re-opening of Verona restaurant

Situated in the heart of The Ritz-Carlton, Abama’s Citadel building and behind its renowned Moorish façade, an open and airy new dining space encourages a vibrant experience true to Italian spirit. White-washed brick walls surround, with accents of wood and graphic wood collaging. Verona’s towering wine cabinets will house its generous collection of Italian wines, complemented by an international list and local island favourites. Each table will be dressed sharply with white table linens juxtaposed with bespoke-design crockery. A large terrace area will also enable diners to enjoy the year-round temperate climate against a backdrop of lush tropical plants and terracotta vistas.

Open every day from 6pm for dinner reservations, Verona will add to guests’ exceptional choice of restaurants, joining The Ritz-Carlton, Abama’s two Michelin-starred, M.B. and Kabuki venues, and its latest openings, Txoko from Martin Berasategui, and the 20/20 steakhouse launched in December 2016.

Bernardis - Cemento by Viero

Product Spotlight: Cemento from Viero

800 532 Daniel Fountain

If your interior design style is all about feeling the forces of nature, you won’t be disappointed with the décor at popular Italian restaurant Bernardi’s in the London’s West End.

Thanks to Viero UK’s Italian wall finish product called Cemento, the restaurant’s renovation project has been earning rave reviews. Specified for the project by interior and architecture design studio Coote & Bernardi, the Marble Arch eatery is well worth a visit.

Founder Gabriel Bernardi said: “Cemento has an earthy feel to compliment the Italian vibe we wanted to encompass – we really wanted to bring the outdoors in.
“Since completing the project, there is this wonderful relief on the walls – it’s this added attention to detail that we wanted to incorporate as opposed to flat painted walls. The end product is absolutely stunning – we still receive regular compliments on how atmospheric the dining area is – we couldn’t have asked for a better result.”

Bernardis - Cemento by Viero

Cemento is one of many of Viero UK’s specialist surface finishes designed to give a textured and characterful ambience.

This particular decorative plaster is pre-blended at Viero’s Italian laboratory made of water dispersible acrylic resin, micronized inert charges, light stable pigments and specific additives. It is recommended for fine decoration of interior walls where a concrete effect is desired, giving our clients an authentic look.

The rugged textures that are achieved with the application of this product bring a touch of the outdoor elements to an interior project. It’s perfect for capturing a natural theme.

Feel inspired to use Cemento in your next project? Email enquries@viero.co.uk to find out more.

Bombay Cental, Harrow - Dawnvale

Project Spotlight: Dawnvale at Bombay Central, Harrow

550 367 Daniel Fountain

The inspiration for Bombay Central is taken from in and around the main station of India. The brief for Dawnvale was to design and recreate the hustle bustle culture and lifestyle of the main station and to combine this with an infusion of contemporary Indian cuisine.

Previously named The Old Wealdstone Inn, this was stripped back to exposed brickwork. The bricks were treated and sealed to create an authentic look that emphasised the natural character of the building. The internal decor features cracked leather fixed seating with handcrafted slat work and bespoke industrial metal trellis work. Genuine Indian treasures were imported from India to recreate the essence of India.

A centrepiece of the restaurant is the marble island bar with bespoke glass racks.

The kitchen design incorporates the latest energy saving technology which includes a K E R S heat recovery system which converts wasted kitchen energy into hot water together with bespoke low energy induction woks reducing carbons and offering considerable energy savings.

dawnvale.com

docklands bar and grill

Docklands hotel receives £70k bar and grill boost

600 398 Daniel Fountain

A popular Docklands hotel has invested £70,000 in a new-look waterfront restaurant.

Docklands Bar & Grill at Crowne Plaza London – Docklands has undergone extensive refurbishment works, transforming the dining space with a new contemporary aesthetic, reflective of the local environment.

The project was led by interior designer Amanda McMorris of ICA, and sees the eatery feature all-new décor. Amanda said: “Our design concept, ‘Reflections’, has come from the landscape and culture of the Docklands area itself. For example, the new colour scheme in the restaurant takes inspiration from the effect of the imposing skyline interacting with the surface of the water below. Our aim is to make the restaurant feel very at home in its surroundings.”

Daniel Loosley, general manager of Crowne Plaza London – Docklands – managed by the UK’s leading independent hotel management company Redefine|BDL Hotels – said: “Docklands Bar & Grill is a popular destination among Londoners and visitors alike, and receives huge passing custom from the neighbouring ExCel Exhibition Centre.

“We have made this investment to maximise the appeal of this comfortable, modern space in the heart of this historic area, and we are delighted with the results now the work is completed.”

Crowne Plaza London – Docklands has 210 guest rooms, offers a complimentary shuttle to Canary Wharf on weekdays and features an on-site taxi company.

Burger + Lobster, W Hotel Leicester Square

Sneak Peek: Restaurant design at W Hotel, London

588 354 Daniel Fountain

DesignLSM has recently completed the interior design for Burger & Lobster – Leicester Square, helping to bring the popular concept to the exclusive location of the 5-star W hotel.

The restaurant forms part of the brand’s current expansion plans along with the recent openings of the London sites of West India Quay and Holborn.

Located a short stroll away from the bustling Soho site, Burger & Lobster Leicester Square is housed beneath the W’s striking exterior, in an arresting double height space with a vast mezzanine upper floor featuring an open kitchen and dining area.

DesignLSM designers retained some of the sites original features including the grand brass bar front, central spiral staircase and timber flooring carefully curating these elements into the brand’s unique design scheme.

Inside the restaurant a dazzling hanging light chandelier takes centre stage, designed to be evocative of the luxury hotel’s external lighting facade. The signature features of lobster tanks and bold banquette seating create an instantly recognisable connection to the Burger & Lobster brand accompanied by the new addition of a refined and relaxed downstairs bar and lounge area.

DesignLSM have worked with Burger & Lobster on all of their restaurants in the UK and internationally, helping to establish the unique brand through signature interior design elements in each of their hugely popular restaurants.

“It has been a pleasure to work with Burger & Lobster and assist them with their ambitious growth – we have relished the opportunity of developing the brand and interiors as they have expanded, creating a truly recognisable personality and engaging environment. We look forward to continuing this exciting and enjoyable journey with our client,” said Andrew Harwood, Projects Director.

All images © James French Photography

Kerylos Intérieurs gives The Avenue, Brussels a fresh new lookBrussels

Kerylos Intérieurs gives The Avenue, Brussels a fresh new look

1000 500 Daniel Fountain

Located within the Hotel Barsey by Warwick in Brussels, The Avenue by Barsey restaurant recently unveiled a dramatic new look created by Paris-based interior design agency Kerylos Intérieurs.

Already recognised as a pivotal destination on the culinary map of Brussels, the brief was to create an interior environment befitting of the restaurant’s stellar reputation.

In three short months, Kerylos Intérieurs were able to create a luxury space that maintained the existing structure with a strong new personality.

Based on an alchemy of comfort, warmth and luxury, the design plays on a contrast between full and empty spaces, ornate finishings against a simplified linear layout and a monochrome structure filled with touches of rich hues.

www.kerylosinterieurs.com