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SB Architects

Sneak peek inside The St. Regis Longboat Key Resort and Residences

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Sneak peek inside The St. Regis Longboat Key Resort and Residences

Designed by HBA Miami and Mac-Michaels Interior Design, with architecture by SB Architects, The St. Regis Longboat Key Resort and Residences is expected to open in spring 2024. Inside the elegant 166-room resort and 69 private luxury condominiums capture the natural beauty of the Gulf Coast and deliver a sense of relaxed comfort and barefoot luxury. Editor Hamish Kilburn gets a sneak peek inside…

SB Architects, an international architecture firm celebrated for creating spaces that capture the history, culture, and context of each location, has revealed the design for The St. Regis Longboat Key Resort and Residences, a new resort community nestled in the beautiful white sands of the Gulf of Mexico.

Arial view of site where The St Regis Longboat Key will be

Image credit: SB Architects

Situated on a barrier island outside of Sarasota, Florida, The St. Regis Longboat Key is scheduled to break ground this autumn and will deliver luxury seaside living with the amenities and service of a world-class, five-star resort upon opening in spring 2024.

Developed by Unicorp National Developments, the elegant 166-key resort and 69 private luxury condominiums will be distinguished both for the property’s architectural expression and the level of luxury that the St. Regis brand will bring to the locale. SB Architects is working alongside Hirsch Bedner Associates Miami (HBA), Marc-Michaels Interior Design, and Enea Landscape Design to bring the vision to life.

Render of bar in St Regis Longboat Key

Image credit: HBA Miami

Comprised mostly of glass, the buildings feature clean lines, fine detailing, and soaring floor-to-ceiling windows that draw in natural light and showcase stunning coastal views. “Our goal was to create a sense of relaxed comfort and elegance through contemporary design in both the resort and private residences,” said Pinar Harris, SB Architects’ Vice President and Principal. “Drawing inspiration from the existing landscape for materials and celebrating the pristine waters of the Gulf of Mexico through visual connections to the ocean, the design channels the spirit of the St. Regis brand through a timeless expression of barefoot luxury.” 

An immersive experience begins the moment guests and residents arrive, as they enter through a canopy of jacaranda trees. Inside, an entry corridor enhances the view to the ocean through an immersive, barrel-vaulted digital ceiling, where ambient lighting reflects the sky’s spectacular sunset colours daily. Projectors display graceful birds across the ceiling intermittently, capturing a sense of movement and bringing the outdoor environment inside. 

In addition to drawing inspiration from dance-like moments in nature, including the skillful flight of birds along the shore, the resort interiors by HBA honor Sarasota’s culture and history by gesturing toward the intersection of circus and dance. Sarasota is renowned for its performing arts – including The Sarasota Ballet – and for its circus heritage, owing to circus impresario John Ringling, who so loved Sarasota that he chose it for the winter quarters of Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey. Showcasing a clean and natural palette of colours, the contemporary interiors leverage these local insights in subtle touches, such as rope-like chandeliers suspended from the ceiling; an oval-shaped ballroom inspired by aerial rings; and in the St. Regis Bar, a centre feature latticed like a circus cage rising into the ceiling.

In the guestroom corridor, carpet patterns are reminiscent of local ocean currents while flowy drapes drawn over artworks and dramatic lighting add an element of theatrical surprise. Resort guestrooms and luxury residences offer unobstructed views of the ocean, with glass railings creating seamless connections between the outdoor living spaces and natural surroundings. Guestrooms feature wood paneling in the living area and subtle touches of color. Careful layering of materials, such as ceiling paneling with wood grain on the underside of the exterior balconies, complements the natural palette in the interiors and adds a sense of warmth to the architectural expression.

Sophisticated hotel corridor rendering

Image credit: HBA Miami

 The resort features a 20,000 square foot St. Regis Signature Spa, a salt-water lagoon with live fish and sea life, and an open-air Sunset Bar overlooking the Gulf of Mexico, in addition to a meandering drift stream, heated infinity edge pool, beachside event lawns, and business meeting facilities. The private condominiums – ranging from approximately 1,500 to nearly 6,000 square feet – comprise three six-story buildings and offer residents access to the amenities at St. Regis Resort & Spa, in addition to their own dedicated private amenities, including a waterfront pool and spa with a privacy sundeck and Resident’s Clubhouse featuring a world-class Wellness Center with meditation and yoga studios. Each residence will feature expansive terraces – some with infinity edge plunge pools – and a secured private access elevator opening directly into the residence.

Main image credit: SB Architects/HBA Miami

Weekly briefing: Nobu exclusive, Rosewood footprints & sustainability explored

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Weekly briefing: Nobu exclusive, Rosewood footprints & sustainability explored

Editor Hamish Kilburn here with your weekly briefing. This week’s round-up includes an exclusive lighting feature, details about Rosewood’s second hotel in London and how to watch out latest panel discussion on sustainability beneath the surface…

2021 is shaping up to be an extremely exciting year on the hotel design front. Already this quarter, we have seen Zaha Hadid Architects complete an incredible architectural marvel in Dubai, watched Moxy Hotels turn up the volume with a landmark opening in Miami and we have even published plans for hospitality to launch into space.

As impressive as that all sounds, this week, the international development plot has thickened, with Hotel Designs leading the narrative around sustainability and the future of hospitality at Hotel Designs LIVE, Rosewood dropping yet more news around its second arrival in London and a study being launched that cuts through the noise to reveal new demands from modern traveller following the pandemic.

So, without further a due, here are the top stories from the last few days.

The industry comments on International Women’s Day

Gif of strong women for International Women's Day

Our nod to International Women’s Day is more of a formal bow or curtsy. For this year’s IWD, we heard from leading female designers, hoteliers and architects about how far we have come and, crucially, how far we have still got to travel in order to operate in an equal and fair global arena.

Read more. 

EXCLUSIVE // Case study: The bespoke lighting narrative inside London’s Nobu hotel

Image credit: Jack Hardy

Inside Nobu Hotel London Portman Square – a hotel that has caused a lot of noise recently on the international hotel design scene – there is a bespoke lighting narrative that flickers unlike any other. We exclusively caught up with Lyn Newcombe, Head of Projects at Dernier & Hamlyn and Lewis Taylor, Design Director at David Collins Studio, to capture the full story.

Read more. 

Nearly half of Brits surveyed expect air purifiers in tomorrow’s hotel

A navy blue air purifier next to a navy blue bed

Blueair, which produces air purifiers that remove air pollutants like smoke, mold and allergens, recently participated as a Product Watch Pitch Partner at Hotel Designs LIVE. Here, the brand shares insights into how consumers feel about visiting hotels in a post-pandemic world.

Read more.

(In video) Hotel Designs LIVE: Sustainability beneath the surface

Collage of speakers for Hotel Designs LIVE Sustainability talk

On February 23, designers, architects, hoteliers and developers from around the globe tuned in to watch Hotel Designs LIVE. Following an engaging panel discussion on the future of hotel design and hospitality, the spotlight for the second session of the day landed on leading design and hospitality figures to debate sustainability, a topic that continues to be weighed down by heavy stigma. Sponsored by Grohe, a brand that inherently has sustainability running through its DNA – if recent accolades are anything go by – the panel was inspired by the recent Q&A between Hotel Designs LIVE and eco warrior, Bill Bensley.

Read more. 

Industry insight: Biophilic spa & wellness design

maggies by thomas Hetherwick

Image credit: Thomas Heatherwick

As wellness evolves as we enter a new era of hospitality, we invite Beverley Bayes, Creative Director at Sparcstudio, to discuss the growing trend for biophilic design in spa and wellness properties. It is inevitable that spa and wellness, post-pandemic will become an ever more important and integral part of our lives. We are entering a new era where ‘Health is the New Wealth’ and a healthy lifestyle is recognised as an important part of preventative medicine.

Read more.

In Conversation With: Lucienne Walpole, Vice President, SB Architects

Image of Lucienne Walpole

Since joining SB Architects in 2007, Lucienne Walpole has played a valuable role on the design team for a number of the firm’s most exciting hospitality projects. Combining her dual backgrounds in interior design and architecture, Walpole brings to the firm strengths in space planning as well as architectural design. Following Walpole’s participation in Hotel Designs LIVE conference, we caught up with the architect to learn more.

Read more.

The Chancery Rosewood, arriving in London in 2024

Render of Rosewood London in former US Embassy

Image credit: DBOX for Qatari Diar

Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, which currently manages 27 luxury properties in 16 countries with a further 21 hotels under development, has announced that its second hotel in London will be sheltered in the former US Embassy and will be named The Chancery Rosewood.

Read more.

And finally… 

If you haven’t yet had a change to listen to DESIGN POD, here’s the latest episode. Entitled ‘Choosing Your Lane’, we invite interior designer Constantina Tsoutsikou to join us as our first guest. Episode two, with guest Christos Passas, Director of Zaha Hadid Architects, goes live on Monday!

Since you’re here…

More than 40,000 readers per month enjoy the content we publish on Hotel Designs. Our mission is to define the point on international hotel design, and we are doing that by serving relevant news stories and engaging features. To keep up to date on the hottest stories that are emerging, you can sign up to the newsletter, which is completely free of charge. As well as receiving a weekly round-up of the top stories, you will also access our bi-monthly HD Edit –staying ahead of the curve has never been so easy!

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Image of Lucienne Walpole

In Conversation With: Lucienne Walpole, Vice President, SB Architects

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: Lucienne Walpole, Vice President, SB Architects

SB Architects recently appointed Lucienne Walpole as the firm’s new Vice President. Following Walpole’s participation in Hotel Designs LIVE conference, editor Hamish Kilburn caught up with the architect to learn more…

Image of Lucienne Walpole

Since joining SB Architects in 2007, Lucienne Walpole has played a valuable role on the design team for a number of the firm’s most exciting hospitality projects. Combining her dual backgrounds in interior design and architecture, Walpole brings to the firm strengths in space planning as well as architectural design. She lends a unique perspective while contributing a strong sense of creative vision and attention to detail and has played a crucial role in many high-profile hotel, resort, and multi-family projects.

So when it was revealed that Walpole had been appointed as a new Vice President of the firm, we at Hotel Designs were not surprised. I caught up with Walpole to understand her passion for design and architect, her position on wellness post-pandemic – following the panel discussion the architect took part in during Hotel Designs LIVE last week – while also learning what a typical day looks like in Walpole’s shoes.

Image credit: Conrad Punta de Mita/SB Architects

Image credit: Conrad Punta de Mita/SB Architects

Hamish Kilburn: What attracted you to work in architecture?

Lucienne Walpole: I always knew I wanted to have a career rooted in creativity, but I didn’t seriously set my sights on architecture until the end of college. I initially studied Interior Design but then went straight on to pursue a Masters in Architecture. I think the seed was always there though. I was born, raised, and currently reside in Coral Gables, Florida where we have a wealth of beautiful Old Spanish homes, one of which I grew up in. I watched as my parents transformed the run-down 1920s house into a home full of detail and beauty. They taught me about vision and being able to see past a neglected exterior or a blank page.

Hamish Kilburn: What has been the highlight of your career so far?

LW: Working at Baha Mar in the Bahamas in conjunction with SB Architects has afforded me the opportunity to lead the design of two amazing restaurants. Since Baha Mar is known for its spectacular, out of the box ideas, the client was keen to pursue ideas that might have otherwise been disregarded initially for budgetary or feasibility reasons. Not only did I get to lead the design, but I was able to be a part of the construction administration process. The sweet finale was being able to finally enjoy a meal and a margarita in one of the over-water dining pavilions we designed.

Image caption: The Sky Bar at Baha Mar, designed by SB Architects

Image caption: The Sky Bar at Baha Mar, designed by SB Architects

HK: How do you keep your designs fresh from one project to another?

LW: I’m inspired by the site and local history of each project I work on. Every location has different opportunities and every market demands a different experience. I love looking at imagery for inspiration and revisiting my initial sketches and thoughts.

HK: How has your voice as a designer evolved since joining SB Architects?

LW: I started at SB Architects straight out of graduate school at the age of 24 and I’ve been here ever since. I’ve been lucky to work under great mentors who taught me the ins-and-outs of the hospitality design world, as well as the qualities needed to be a good leader. As I’ve stretched my wings, I’ve learned not to be afraid to throw out ideas in meetings even if they seem a little crazy. I strive to always think outside of the box and not let go of the original design intent too easily.

HK: Describe a typical working day for you…

LW: I wake up before anyone else in the house in order to squeeze in a quick workout before jumping in the shower, making lunches, and getting myself ready. After I’ve dropped off our two young boys at school, I rush off to the office to start my day. These days I’m doing a mixture of working from home as well as working in the office. Once in front of my computer, I dig right in since time without the distraction of two little ones is limited these days. I’m usually designing in AutoCad and sketching, completing image research, and taking Zoom calls with clients and my team. A good podcast, audio book, or music is a must.

HK: What advice do you have for younger generations of women wanting to get into design leadership positions?

LW: As women, and often mothers, we are great multi-taskers and time managers. Don’t wait for the opportunity but instead speak up about what your goals are. Also, know that it’s ok to offer up ideas and speak up in every setting. Most of the senior leadership I work with are so busy that I think they appreciate it when someone else is willing to take the reigns on a new initiative.

Image credit: Conrad Punta de Mita/SB Architects

Image credit: Conrad Punta de Mita/SB Architects

HK: Where do you see hotel design 10 years from now?

LW: I think hotel design will evolve into a space where wellness isn’t just a line item in the program, but instead infused into each space touching all five senses, wellness will become as commonplace, and as considered as lighting. I think operations and hotel design will begin to be more closely tied, especially considering all the last 12 months has taught us. Not just from how the back-of-house spaces work, but how an operator can customise an experience for the guest and how the design can support that.

HK: You joined us on the virtual sofa at Hotel Designs LIVE a few weeks ago for a session on wellness. What will wellness’ role be post-pandemic?

LW: I feel wellness will not only be about the physical but the mental too. We need to move our bodies, but we also need to rest our minds. The wellness experience should also extend from adults, all the way to the youngest of children. I think this theme of inclusivity will push travel to become more meaningful and provide more teaching opportunities.

HK: Are you working on any upcoming projects that you can tell us about?

LW: I’m working on an urban retreat, Al Yosr Clubhouse, located just outside of Cairo, Egypt. We’re designing the space to be an urban sanctuary for the surrounding community and those looking for a wellness experience. The clubhouse will have a large spa component, a few F&B venues, as well as a sunken garden that stretches the length of the site providing different pockets of space to relax, meet, and play.

HK: What design/architecture trends are you seeing for 2021?

LW: Meaningful travel, intention, less public spaces, more outdoor spaces. Providing more spaces for those working remotely. More local travel. Curated experiences and personalisation. Sustainability and wellness will move away from being a buzz word, but an expected feature… at least within the luxury market space.

Main image credit: SB Architects

Render of two isolated pod-like buildings made of wood

Architecture trends for 2021 & beyond

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Architecture trends for 2021 & beyond

To cut through the noise of emerging architecture trends, we hear from architecture firm SB Architect’s President and Principal, Scott Lee, and Senior Vice President and Principal, Bruce Wright…

Render of two isolated pod-like buildings made of wood

Last week, we published our close look at surface trends, where it was concluded that strict pre-pandemic industry standards mean that hospitality design is “well-placed to weather the storm” without a major supply-side rethink.

Following this feature, SB Architects, an award-winning international architecture firm focusing on designing soulful and inspiring destinations across hospitality, residential and mixed-use, has stepped up to release what its team believe are the top architecture trends that are emerging in 2021.

“One positive thing to come out of this pandemic is that design and architecture will be more responsive and intuitive to the needs of humanity unlike ever before.” – Scott Lee, President and Principal, SB Architects.

Undoubtably, the Covid-19 pandemic has left an indelible mark across every industry, shifting priorities, and dramatically impacting how the firm – and industry as a whole – approaches design as well as how architecture trends are defined. “2021 will be a year of transformational growth for society – and how we design our world in response to the recent events will create lasting change for years to come,” said Scott Lee, President and Principal, SB Architects. “The architecture community must shift our way of thinking about how society will function moving forward, with a focus on designing spaces for our physical and mental wellbeing. I believe one positive thing to come out of this pandemic is that design and architecture will be more responsive and intuitive to the needs of humanity unlike ever before.”

Experience-driven design

SB Architects sees experience-driven design continuing to thrive in the years ahead. Our lives are filled with experiences that are all fulfilled virtually – from ordering food online to work and school. To make an impact, spaces must be adaptable and designed to enhance our wellbeing and offer a physical experience that elevates the offering from the virtual – a moment of ‘wow’ so to speak. Spaces will be designed to entice occupants to feel energised and experience the natural surroundings of a space to reconnect with nature.

Arches at Miami Design District by SB Architects.

Image credit: Miami Design District by SB Architects

The firm sees this architecture trend extending into the retail space, too. Retail development can no longer just be basic, cookie-cutter boxes in an open space; it needs to be a multi-faceted community and cultural experience. Retailers have and will continue to get creative with strategically curated facades to inspire and arouse curiosity – the idea that retail is entertainment.

Going private in public

People want to feel connected and be able to socialise in a way that feels safe. Guests are going to be socialising outside for the foreseeable future, and the coming year will showcase innovative design solutions that speak to this pressing need. This will lead to a rise in zoned dining in hotel spaces including pavilions and landscape barriers to create safe spaces for eating in public.

Hotel Villagio, restaurant

Image credit: SB Architects/Hotel Villagio

A street well-known for restaurants may close on Friday night so that it is walkable with seating outdoors, and food trucks, dining al fresco, and micro-restaurants with takeout windows will likely become more popular. Hyper-personalisation has always been a luxury signifier, but the current climate is pushing for innovation, SB Architects anticipates a rise in interesting private dining options and chef-to-table experiences.

 Hybrid hotels: the rise of ‘bleisure’ travel

A trend at the intersection between hospitality and residential is the aparthotel – hotel rooms that function like an apartment, reducing the amount of guest to staff interaction.

Render of outdoor pool surrounded by mountains

Image credit: SB Archtiects/Pendry Park City Residences

This trend is experiencing a comeback and gaining traction for a number of reasons; the locations are desirable, guests can stay for extended periods of time to experience ‘living like a local’, and a huge majority of the population is working from home, meaning that ‘staycations’ and localised travel, for ‘bleisure’ (business and leisure) are rapidly growing in popularity.

render of ground-level f&b area, open to nature

Image caption/credit: Render of Speciality Restaurant | SB Architects/Conrad Hotels & Resorts

In a similar vein, SB Architects anticipates branded private residences will continue to grow in popularity. Buyers will gravitate to luxury hotel brands that they trust from the hospitality space, with residences that offer a suite of unique and boutique offerings the most in-demand with buyers, given the increased focus on customising residential spaces and spending more time at home.

“This focus on intentional wellness translates into adopting more empathetic design.”

Intentional wellness

Human beings have an innate biological affinity to nature. Biophilia, spending time immersed in natural environments, is proven to reduce stress and improve a person’s well-being. In terms of the built environment, the crisis has reinforced the belief in the positive power of nature, placing it front and centre of the hospitality experience through outdoor facilities, natural light, and fresh airflow.

Presidential Bathroom_St. Regis Los Cabos_HBA

Image credit: HBA San Francisco/SB Architects/St Regis Los Cabos

It also reinforces a broader trend for intimately scaled environments that emphasise privacy and personal space. People are taking a slower and more considerate approach to travel and are looking to bring that same sense of peace and tranquility into their personal space.

Over the next few years, SB Architects anticipates an upsurge of people prioritising exercise and wellness into their homes. This focus on intentional wellness translates into adopting more empathetic design – or design that acts as a conduit of an experience and not an architectural statement.

 The science of feeling good

The current global pandemic has instilled a sense of uncertainty and unease, and hotels are going to be relied upon to provide a space to escape, disconnect and retreat in comfort. Today’s traveller is looking to check-in to a hotel and find the same level of comfort, if not more, than they have at home. Most people are now living a relatively ‘smart’ life, using AI daily, with smart assistants managing and automating a lot of day-to-day tasks – from waking them up and turning on the heaters, to ordering their groceries – so, a ‘smart’ hotel room is almost expected.

“Once the pandemic eases, SB Architects predicts a rise in ‘tech-free’ packages to allow guests to detox from being consistently connected.”

 Tackling tech-burnout

Technology was already evolving at an incredible rate but has gained momentum and taken on a lightning pace in reaction to the Covid-19 crisis. The global pandemic has proven to be a catalyst for acceleration and change.

Working remotely has created the expectation that one is always available, creating a ‘tech burnout’. Luxury hospitality is defined by choice, and guests want the choice of how they interact with technology during their hotel stay, whether that is being connected, offline, or somewhere in-between. Once the pandemic eases, SB Architects predicts a rise in ‘tech-free’ packages to allow guests to detox from being consistently connected, providing a chance to unplug and enjoy a no-tech experience without smartphones and computers. 

bar designed in natural wood overlooking the sea

Image credit: Kimpton Hotels/SB Architects

“The past year has given us a clearer focus of the ideal function of shared spaces and how architecture and design must be sensitive to the needs of occupants,” said Bruce Wright, senior vice president and principal of SB Architects. “Simply put, 2020 has underscored the fact that we need our spaces to do more for us – more flexibility in form and function and to inspire creativity and promote wellness. We are looking forward to meeting these new challenges.”

Main image credit: SB Architects/ascaya

SB Architects unveils seven new hospitality projects in North America and Mexico

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
SB Architects unveils seven new hospitality projects in North America and Mexico

Architecture firm SB Architects has announced seven new hospitality projects that are opening in North America and Mexico…

Full-service global architecture firm, SB Architects, has been breaking ground in hotel, residential and mixed-use design for almost 60 years, and is delighted to announce seven new hospitality projects that are opening, in progress or breaking ground this year.

“It’s been a very productive and prolific year for SB Architects with so many high-caliber projects in various stages of the pipeline,” said Scott Lee, President and Principal of SB Architects. “We’re thrilled for the opportunity to work on such diverse and inspiring projects and in so many interesting destinations. From a luxury destination resort in Los Cabos that seamlessly blends French and Mexican culture, to a sophisticated ski-in, lift-out destination in Utah, these projects showcase the scope of our capabilities and the breadth of our portfolio.”

Sofitel SO Los Cabos (San José del Cabo, Baja California Sur, Mexico)
Slated to complete: 2021

Render of beqachside luxury hotel

Image credit: Sofitel Los Cabos

Set on a prominent five-acre beachfront site in premier tourist destination, Los Cabos, this five-star luxury resort cascades gently down to the white sandy beaches below, providing unobstructed Pacific Ocean views throughout. Inspired by the vibrant history of Mexican haciendas and the central role of family gathering spaces, the resort embraces bold, contemporary architectural features with vivid interior hues, paying homage to the authentic Zócalo (community spaces) experience. The SO brand is the epitome of sophisticated modern French aesthetic which, when combined with the beautifully rich Mexican culture, creates a unique and inviting experience. The destination resort boasts 210 keys, 40 branded residences, conference and meeting center, spa, specialty restaurant and ultra-lounge, and beach club. The residential resort has 87 units, ranging from 1,960 to 4,329 square feet, along with fitness and entertainment amenities.

The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Sarasota (Sarasota, Florida)
Slated to complete: 2020

Render of The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Sarasota

Image credit: The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Sarasota

The 18-story tower is an additional branded residential component to the existing Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Sarasota. Located on Sarasota Bay, the tower has been designed at a distinctive angle, providing both a visually interesting exterior along with unobstructed views of the water. The new tower links to the Ritz-Carlton Hotel on level three and offers residents easy access to exclusive amenities. Level three and above houses three- and four-bedroom units with stunning views in two directions. Multiple elevator locations ensure that each residence will share a lobby with no more than one other unit. Wide cantilevered balconies will circle the building, providing each unit with private outdoor space. Additional amenities include a large rooftop pool and entertainment area. Images can be found here.

Pendry Residences Park City (Park City, Utah)
Slated to complete: 2021

Render of swimming pool on hotel

Image credit: Pendry Residences Park City

The luxury ski-in, lift-out destination will add a new level of sophistication to mountain living from its central location in the new Canyons Village. Luxury hospitality brand, Pendry, delivers polished comfort with a modern edge and prides itself on epitomizing the character of a neighborhood, whether that be through art, culture, design, or music. Ideally situated amidst thousands of acres of exceptional terrain, Pendry Residences Park City will transform the traditional alpine lodge into a modern, life-enriching base to call home, featuring 150 fully-serviced guestrooms and suites, ranging in size from studios to four-bedroom. The residences boast the services and amenities of a luxury resort, including a private ski valet, spa, a variety of restaurant and bar options, and the only rooftop bar and pool in the area. With four unique lounges, restaurant and bar experiences, Pendry Residences Park City will provide an exceptional venue for perfecting the art of Apres Ski with music, food and drinks, and good company.

Conrad Playa Mita (Punta de Mita, Mexico)
Slated to complete: 2019

Render of beachfront hotel

Image credit: Conrad Playa Mita

A tranquil respite from Mexico City’s energetic pace, the 154-key Conrad Playa Mita boasts serene natural landscapes, aquamarine waters and uninhabited isles. Designed to exist in harmony with the natural environment and luxurious locale, the rejuvenating Riviera Nayarit destination resort immerses guests in a tropical oasis. With modern expressions of architectural sophistication, Conrad Punta Mita dovetails with the dramatic natural scenery, providing every guestroom and suite with unobstructed views of the Pacific Ocean. Drawing inspiration from Mexico’s rich history and unique culture, indigenous artwork integrates with luxurious amenities to create a sense of barefoot resort elegance. In each motif lies a story, a statement and a valued part of the local Mexican identity. Facilities include three dining venues, pool, spa and 45,000 square feet of combined function space; including 30,000 square feet outdoor event space, 10,000 square-foot ballroom, and 3,000 square feet of breakout rooms, each with ample pre-function terraces.

Saltaire Bayfront Towers (St. Petersburg, Florida)
Slated to complete: 2022

Render of towering hotel

Image credit: Saltaire Bayfront Towers

Continuing the ongoing collaboration with Kolter Urban, SB Architects have introduced a timeless luxury addition to the St. Petersburg skyline. Designed in a modernist language quintessential to Florida, the 35-story residential tower employs striking white architectural forms, punctuated by floor-to-ceiling windows, that boast unobstructed views across Tampa Bay. Spacious two-story lofts line 1st Street South and the internalized arrival court is activated with retail frontage. With an average of 361 days of sunshine each year, an elevated, Olympic-length pool has been designed to offer spectacular, unobstructed views over the glistening Bayboro Harbor.

Omni PGA Golf Resort and Spa (Frisco, Texas)
Slated to complete: 2022

The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) of America is moving its headquarters from Palm Beach County, Florida to Frisco, Texas, where it will anchor a 600-acre mixed-use development with an initial investment worth more than half a billion dollars. The PGA of America is teaming with Omni Stillwater Woods (OSW), a joint venture led by Omni Hotels & Resorts with Stillwater Capital and Woods Capital, the City of Frisco, its Economic and Community Development Corporations, and the Frisco Independent School District. The Omni brand is known for its elevated service and amenities, including golf. The PGA Golf Resort, alongside the headquarters of the PGA of America, promises to be a first-class destination attracting avid golfers from far and wide.

Park Hyatt Los Cabos Resort (Los Cabos, Mexico)
Slated to complete: 2021

Render of aerial perspective of hotel show of

Image credit: Park Hyatt Los Cabos Resort

Situated on a spectacular site overlooking the sea with unobstructed water views and two secluded beaches, Park Hyatt Los Cabos is a 162-room destination resort with 35 branded private residences. A modern design, influenced by the surrounding desert scape, the rugged coastline and the indigenous architecture of the region. Guests will enjoy amenities including restaurants, a luxury spa, outdoor terraces and private plunge pools.

With almost 60 years of continuous practice, SB Architects has established a world-wide reputation for excellence in the planning and design of large-scale hotels, resorts, destination resort communities, and all associated resort amenities, as well as large-scale multi-family residential and urban mixed-use projects.

Main image credit: Sofitel Los Cabos

Interior of Stand Art Hotel

Top 5 stories of the week: Russian-doll hotels, culture clashes and openings in the City of Design

800 534 Hamish Kilburn

Hotel Designs editor Hamish Kilburn breaks down the week with the top five stories…

With our focus this month being on fabrics, textiles and soft furnishings, weaving together this week’s top five stories has been one that I have thoroughly enjoyed. Mitre Linen has put the topic of soft furnishings firmly in the spotlight to unveil new ways in which hotels can stand out from the crowd. In other news, hotel group IHG seems to be going from strength to strength, unveiling yet another Hotel Indigo property, this time in the City of Design in Dundee, Scotland. In rather apt form, with the World Cup final fast approaching, our editorial team have been busy to uncover the best design hotels in Russia. On top of all this, SLEEP + EAT, which takes shelter under a new roof this year at London’s Olympia, has unveiled the themes and designers for this year’s Sleep Sets, while SB Architects unveils two rather unusual hotels in China.

And breathe… Here are the top five stories of the week!

1) IHG Hotel Indigo unveiled in Dundee, the UK’s first UNESCO City of Design 

Modern restaurant

Topping our charts this week is the new arrival of a funky hotel in the City of Design… InterContinental Hotels Group (IHG) has opened Hotel Indigo® Dundee, in one of Europe’s rising design destinations – Dundee, Scotland. Once famous for its textiles, the city’s industrial spaces are now filled with artists and collectives, including a thriving gaming community who have helped turn Dundee into the creative heart of the world’s computer games industry.

2) Sleep Sets for SLEEP + EAT 2018 introduces unusual partnerships 

Sleep + Eat has announced the theme for this year’s Sleep Sets, as well as the four design companies inspired to create the concept rooms. The challenge for each designer is to partner with a brand but, in the tradition of Sleep + Eat, these brands are not the usual suspects. HBA London will be working with the Natural History MuseumDenton Corker Marshall will tackle West Ham Football ClubYasmine Mahmoudieh is to pair with Penguin Modern Classics; and AB Concept will collaborate with Maison Pierre Hermé Paris. Each Sleep Set designer has been tasked with creating a guestroom concept based on their partner brand’s aesthetic and values. Innovative and engaging, the sets will facilitate new and imaginative ways for visitors to interact with the selected brands.

3) East meets west at two new Chateau-style winery boutique hotels in China 

SB Architects has announced several new planned communities and destinations in China, including two new winery boutique hotels. From winery resorts in Dalian and Beijing to mixed-use developments in emerging areas, SB Architects has announced master planned projects for its Chinese clients looking to capitalise on the China’s growing luxury lifestyle industry.

4) SOFT FURNISHINGS: Colour, clean identity and a sprinkle of inspiration from musical icons

Heritage Serenity range from Mitre

Image caption: Heritage Serenity range from Mitre

Simon O’Mahony, Managing Director of Mitre Linen, explains how soft furnishings, linen and colour can help a hotel stand out from the crowd. Hospitality is a congested market, and customers are increasingly discerning with a huge range of options to choose from. In short, it’s crucial to stand out by having a clear identity which extends into every room of your hotel. Having a well-defined offering clearly positions your business and makes it more appealing to particular customers. What’s more, using colour can help bring the values of your business into every room.

5) Top 7 design hotels in Russia

Image Credit: Flickr, Deensel

Riddled in history, Russia holds many hotel gems within its borders. In recent years, hospitality has also been on the rise with a boom in hotel development. TOPHOTELCONSTRUCTION database recently confirmed this by announcing that Russia has 96 projects upcoming hotels that are slated to shelter 18,437 rooms. Of these projects, 49 percent of the hotels are being planned to open in 2021 or beyond, while a whopping 17 per cent are expected to open this year.

With this in mind, and as the eyes of the world focus on the host nation in the lead up to the FIFA World Cup final, our editorial team did some digging to unveil the best design hotels in Russia – and here they are in no particular order.

 

East meets west at two new Chateau-style winery boutique hotels in China

1024 575 Hamish Kilburn

SB Architects has announced several new planned communities and destinations in China, including two new winery boutique hotels…

From winery resorts in Dalian and Beijing to mixed-use developments in emerging areas, SB Architects has announced master planned projects for its Chinese clients looking to capitalise on the China’s growing luxury lifestyle industry.

“Master planned projects continue to emerge in China, providing more opportunities for a luxury lifestyle that provides a sense of place through amenities, services and experiences,” said Scott Lee, president of SB Architects. “Our planned communities are distinct in that the design incorporates natural surroundings and local culture in order to create a solid sense of place. We look to tie in new brands, new experiences and new destinations through comprehensive design and planning. We’re delighted to be part of this growing trend and to be able to provide our clients with this expertise.”

Slated to open in end of 2018, Golden Pebble Winery in Dalian China is the first winery resort to open in China’s Liaoning Province. Set in the mountain valley with designs inspired by farmhouses, Golden Pebble Winery will encompass a true master plan concept, with a welcome center, full-production winery, a boutique hotel, and commercial and residential villages. The Liaodong Peninsula is known for beaches, golfing and temperate climate, and the design reflects this with building forms and materials that reinforce the authenticity of a warm environment. Located on 200 hectares, the resort is surrounded by hillside villages, with the residences tucked into upper reaches of the hills, providing expansive views of surrounding vineyards.

Exterior of Golden Pebble Winery

Image caption: Exterior of Golden Pebble Winery

Luneng Wen’an Winery & Hotel opened in 2018, and includes two hotels and a full production winery on a picturesque lakeside site south of Beijing. SB Architects’ first winery resort to open in China, the resort provides a luxury experience surrounded by water, botanical gardens and nearby vineyards. The 400-room hotel designed with a rustic sophistication sits upon an island in the middle of the lake, and the European Chateau-style winey sits at the opposite end of the body of water. The nearby mixed-use village town center features retail-space and residences in the upper levels.

Exterior of Luneng Wen’an Winery & Hotel

Image caption: Exterior of Luneng Wen’an Winery & Hotel

SB Architects’ other projects in China include Dragon Elephant Valley International Resort in Nanning, Guangxi, Mission Hills Volcanic Mineral Springs & Spa, LiHu Golf Resort in Hainan, Jade Shores in Qingdao, and Hilton Fuxian Lake in Kunming.

Image credits: SB Architects