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Editor Checks In: Embracing meaningful trends

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Editor Checks In: Embracing meaningful trends

Following a colourful year in the hot seat at Hotel Designs, editor Hamish Kilburn looks ahead to a more meaningful future of interior design moments and trends as he gives his thoughts on Pantone’s Colour of the Year, Classic Blue…

If I have learned anything in 2019 from listening to the leading designers, architects, hoteliers and developers who are no doubt shaping the future of the international hotel design scene, it is that every hotel design brief is unique and different.

By giving a new project a fresh perspective on the drawing board and when specifying products, the industry has been able to drive forwards; to unveil creative and exciting spaces unlike anywhere else in the world. The most common element used to emphasise an interior design scheme to create these statement spaces is indeed colour.

A few weeks ago, Hotel Designs was among the first to unveil Pantone’s Colour of the Year. In doing so, I witnessed two things. Firstly, that Pantone is bolding making a defiant move away from the warm, buoyant and energised Living Coral in order to focus on a deeper, calmer and more connected hue as its colour of 2020. My second realisation was more of an affirmation, which was that many within the interior design community continue to turn their heads away from yet another trend – and I have sympathy for those individuals.

“The aim of a commercial designer is to create style and not to repurpose fashion.”

As someone who receives many trend and colour forecasts, all of which are full of contradictions and confusing conclusions, I totally get why there’s a resistance among the leading designers and architects to accept trends. After all, the aim of a commercial designer is to create style and not to repurpose fashion. But every so often, a trend becomes more of a movement; a reflection of modern times, if you like, in order to add meaning into what can often feel like a senseless flow of Instagram and Pinterest posts and mindless moodboards.

It may shock you, therefore, that I recently succumbed to the demand and pressure and put my name to a trends forecast. Hoping to inspire and to create the ingredients for new conversations, as opposed to limit designers in where they should be sourcing their inspiration from, my feature was written sensitively for those who, like me, usually avoid the forecasts.

“If you only have the capacity to humour just one trend this winter, then by all means choose Classic Blue.”

In two separate editorial roundtables that Hotel Designs hosted recently, there was one motif that was louder than others. While each discussion was attended by different leading designers and architects, all seemed to agree that their clients have become much more informed around the connections between design, architecture and people. As a result, now more than ever before, commercial designers and architects are able to make decisions with greater purpose; to create extra layers, instil a stronger sense of place and to make a space more functional so that it can withstand the evolving demands of modern travellers.

While the industry, as a whole, becomes more aware of the environment, sustainable practice and the need for designing consciously, Pantone’s Classic Blue is in my opinion a nod to just how thoughtful design in the hospitality arena currently is. And therefore, if you only have the capacity to humour just one trend this winter, then by all means choose Classic Blue.

On the surface, it’s fair to say that Pantone’s Colour of the Year can be seen as safe, uninspiring and for the lack of a better phrase, just a bit dull. However, when considering the context – and relating it back to the world we are currently trying to make better a place – then Classic Blue becomes a symbol of hope and prosperity.

Having lived through the shelf lives of Greenery in 2017, Ultra Violet in 2018 and more recently Living Coral in 2019, Classic Blue on the contrary has longevity and feels like a harmonious step back to embracing the basics. The colour slots in nicely to create harmony in an era that is obsessed with technology and is increasingly lacking in time.

Classic Blue is flexible as well as firm. It’s dependable, thought-provoking and, paired with the right colour, it can create a number of different ambiances that are more meaningful, allowing the designer to take control. Classic Blue is non-aggressive, simple and has boundless uses in order to create endless interior scenarios.

Moving away from the aesthetical properties, blue is also considered to be beneficial to the mind, body and spirit, with experts going as far to say that it produces a calming effect. The shimmering blue infinity pool in the sanctuary I checked in to at Jade Mountain in Saint Lucia earlier this year certainly had that impact. If nothing else, Classic Blue is peaceful and a strong foundation for creativity to flourish on top.

“It’s been an extraordinary year to be at the helm of the editorial desk.”

Allowing Pantone’s Colour of the Year 2020 to work its magic early; to slow down my human metabolism on the editorial desk as I reflect on some of Hotel Designs’greatest moments of 2019, here are this year’s most-read stories:

As you can see, it’s been an extraordinary year to be at the helm of the editorial desk, which was complete with an extensive rebrand in Q1, publishing exclusive interviews, hotel reviews in far-flung destinations around the world, sharing up-to-date daily news coverage and hosting a plethora of engaging events.

Thank you for being a significant part of our journey, and helping us complete our ultimate goal, which is to define the point on international hotel design. All that is left to say is happy holidays and I look forward to reconnecting with new projects to put under the editorial lens in the New Year.

Editor, Hotel Designs

Interior design trends to look out for in 2020 and beyond

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Interior design trends to look out for in 2020 and beyond

In order to keep an eye on what the industry experts predict will be popular trends for 2020 and beyond, Hotel Designs’ editorial team have identified colours, shapes and concepts that they expect will make an appearance on the international hotel design scene next year (edited by Hamish Kilburn)…

For many designers, architects and hoteliers, ‘trends’ is a dirty word. For too long, the monosyllabic noun has been misused in sentences to create a barrier for creativity, opinions and personable design to flourish.

Nonetheless, the editorial team at Hotel Designs are of the strong opinion that, while trends in the generic sense have become obsolete and replaced by meaningful design to suit a particular design brief or concept, it’s still important to look ahead at expert predictions to understand the value and relevance of certain colours, shapes and forms. With the aim to inform in order to spark new conversations within the industry, here are some interesting trends that we expect to emerge and evolve in 2020.

Neutral colour palettes 

simple orange and red wall covering with chair

Image credit: Arte Wallcoverings’ Les Nuances collection

This year, more and more suppliers have launched ‘essential ranges’ among their collection. By doing so, the focus has been on quality of material and not primarily bold colours or patterns. It’s also no coincidence that Pantone has recently chosen its Colour of the Year to be Classic Blue; a simple tone, which cannot be confused, that symbolises calm, confidence and connection.

As modern travellers continue to demand more home-from-home comforts from their hotel experience – and while hotel design briefs continue to include reference of creating timeless settings, we expect the personality of the property to speak through accessories and soft furnishings, which are inexpensive objects that can be changed easily with little fuss (especially in the boutique hotel market).

Meaningful and sustainable design

Clean and modern guest room

Image credit: Heckfield Place

Less of a trend, and more of a movement, designing meaningful spaces with purpose has been a key drive for many designers and design briefs for hotel projects that have completed this year – and we expect this to evolve further in 2020 with more emphasis on alternative materials.

What sets the leading hotel designers aside from others is their ability to challenge convention in many hotel areas. The lobby, for example, has traditionally, in many regions, been seen as a grand welcome to reflect the wealth of the hotel owner. Recent hotel openings – and hotels that are currently on the boards – suggest that designers are managing to persuade developers and owners to focus on creating sense of place with the use of local craft and materials. One example of a hotel using natural materials in its design is Heckfield Place, which won the Eco Award at The Brit List Awards 2019 for its core aims, which included sourcing design materials and concepts locally.

Textured surfaces

Colourful textures on the wall in front of a soft coral low-level sofa

Image credit: Kubrick collection by Kit Miles Studio

The use of strong gold within the interiors of modern hotels has largely been replaced for warmer metals and and surfaces in order to create more comfortable spaces. As manufacturing technology improves, surfaces are becoming more textured and layered with different materials in order to create interesting patterns and shapes. Kit Miles Studio’s latest collections, Kubrick and Corinthian Check, bring energy back into the walls.

Bold designed rug with colours of blue, orange and black

Image credit: Floor Story/Camille Walala

Meanwhile, manufacturers are injecting energy through meaningful collaborations. Partnering with the likes of 2LG Studio and Camille Walala among others, Floor Story – sheltering its innovative designs at Kent + London – has been able to unveil a number of different bold and boundless rug designs.

Extended patterns

Room filled with one pattern

Image credit: Merge Interiors

There’s plenty of evidence to suggest that in order to create statement areas within the hotel, bold designers will use a single motif that they can reflect in the furniture, soft furnishings and the walls. Replacing feature walls, which we at Hotel Designs believe have had their day, meaningful patterns will be used to create powerful interiors. If MEGRE Interiors’ VIP room at Sleep & Eat 2019 is anything to go by, there are no boundaries as to how far this fabulous concept can go (if injected into the right interior scheme).

Season of contrasts and abstract energy

Image credit: Riggs Washington D.C.

In the fashion, we are currently in the season of contrasts, where one catwalk is being filled with the lavishness of the ’70s French bourgeoisie, while another is paying homage to the spirit of punk. Somewhat diluted, but still on the same page,  designers on the interior scene are striving for abstract energy in order to create fun free-spirited, flexible spaces to cater to the needs of all travellers.

Striking living basket and industrial interiors below

Image credit: Stephan Lemke/25hours Hotel Altes Hafenamt

In regards to how this could affect the international hotel design industry, there has been a rise in independent and quirky lifestyle brands, such as 25hours Hotels and Riggs Washington D.C., that shelter quirky and trend-setting moments. that are giving the hotel design scene a fresh perspective. With the aim to create abstract moments for guests checking in, designers are being given more space to let their creativity flow – arguably giving less emphasis on ‘trends’ and more focus on designing with purpose.

Have your say. If you have identified a trend or design concept that you believe we should be talking about, tweet us @HotelDesigns.

Main image credit: Kit Miles Studio

Hamilton Litestat’s ‘satin’ metallic accessories bring PANTONE’s Colour Of The Year to life

800 658 Hamish Kilburn

Satin Chrome and Satin Stainless-Steel accessories from Hamilton Litestat bring added energy to Pantone’s vibrant Colour of the Year 2019…

The 2019 must-have palette for interior design, fashion and furnishings is set to include PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral, which has been named Pantone Colour of the Year.

Selected by colour trend experts at the Pantone Color Institute, Living Coral is described as an ‘animating and life-affirming coral hue’. As with such announcements and the subjective nature of colour choice, it has received mixed reviews. Amongst the debate and deliberation, the name ‘living coral’ and its wider social commentary on global warming and the state of our diminishing coral reefs has divided opinion. It’s certainly struck a nerve, with some in full support and others slating it as ‘another marketing ploy’.

Whatever your thoughts on the new Pantone Colour of the Year, there’s no getting away from its warm tones bringing energy yet calmness to a space. It’s buoyant, positive and light-hearted. When used in interior design, PANTONE Living Coral rugs, blankets and upholsteries can create a warm and nurturing feeling, while wall colourings and decorative accessories add a dramatic pop of colour.

The vivid sunset hue works well in monochrome schemes and finds a dynamic partnership with blue, reflecting coral’s harmonious relationship with the sea. In the home, it is complemented by Hamilton’s decorative wiring accessories in Satin Chrome and Satin Stainless finishes, whose metallic and reflective tones link to water and bring extra life and sparkle to the on-trend colour.

In addition to the satin chrome and stainless-steel finishes, Satin Brass and Hamilton’s cost-effective white plastic finish in the Hartland CFX design, create crisp, contemporary interiors. For a more coordinated alternative, Hamilton’s Paintables range allows you to exactly match the Pantone as a plate finish, with this option available in Hartland CFX or Sheer CFX.

With a wide range of designs and finishes, along with functionality to suit the modern, connected household or high-end hotel – including dual 2.4A USB double switched socket plates – Hamilton’s electrical wiring accessories provide the perfect finishing touch for any interior scheme, whatever the shade or design.

Hamilton litestat, which celebrated a major milestone in 2018 when the business reached its 50th anniversary, is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, click here.

Main image credit: Hamilton Litestat

 

Illulian unveils Kaboom rug in living coral

806 658 Hamish Kilburn

Now that Pantone has announced The Colour of the Year for 2019, Illulian is pleased to unveil its exclusive Kaboom rug in the shade of Living Coral…

Kaboom depicts a great explosion that recalls the action painting, a highly-charged, impulsive style of abstract gestural painting during which paint is energetically splashed, spilt or dribbled onto a canvas.

The outcome? A veritable work of art: Kaboom is the distinctive, irreverent sign of a splash of colour, enhanced by the use of blue & living coral.

“An animating and life-affirming coral hue with a golden undertone that energizes and enlivens with a softer edge.”

Its incredible palette evokes comfort, positivity and effervescence at the same time. An ironic and charming rug knotted and carded by hand.

Kaboom belongs to the Design Collection: Himalayan wool, pure silk and vegetable colours are the essential elements that contribute to giving the carpet a sophisticated appearance; soft chromatic details guarantee any environment an elegant allure.

Pantone’s colour of the year divides opinions

717 420 Hamish Kilburn

Will Pantone’s peachy orange, sunset-like colour of Living Coral raise awareness of global warming, or is this just another marketing ploy? Hamish Kilburn investigates… 

Earlier last week, colour expert Pantone determined that 2019’s colour of the year will be Living Coral, or Pantone 16-1546. Since then, though, there have been suggestions that the peachy orange shade, which is a clear and defiant move away from this year’s colour of choice, Ultra Violet, has been compared to cheap bridesmaid dresses or budget toilet roll, as well as it being considered as 60 per cent of the world’s remaining reefs are now at risk of being destroyed by human activity.

“While this year’s Ultra Violet shade evoked designers to feel at their boldest, Living Coral has been determined to layer a sense of calmness.”

In the original press release, the company described the colour as an “animating and life-affirming coral hue with a golden undertone that energises and enlivens with a softer edge. Sociable and spirited, the engaging nature of Pantone 16-1546 Living Coral welcomes and encourages lighthearted activity.”

While this year’s Ultra Violet shade evoked designers to feel at their boldest, Living Coral has been determined to layer a sense of calmness over interiors and expected to juxtapose the onslaught of digital technology and social media increasingly embedding into daily life.

It seems as if the opinion to create a smoother and softer environment is shared by other predictions, such as Dulux which recently announced that its colour of 2019 is a shade called Spiced Honey.

As some argue that one colour cannot resemble the current complex climate, others would argue that this bold marketing move has further raised awareness of one of the worst natural disasters happening in our oceans currently.

What do you think, is the horizon looking peachy orange Living Coral to you? Tweet us with your thoughts using @hoteldesigns 

Main image credit: YouTube/Pantone