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    Hospitality sector to generate £100 billion in 2018

    1024 682 Hamish Kilburn

    Data from Adia suggests that the ‘now economy’ has led to the hospitality industry consistently growing at approximately six per cent a year since 2013…

    Extensive analysis of ONS data* published across the last five years by hospitality recruitment platform Adia suggests that the total turnover of all businesses providing ‘Accommodation and Food Services Activities’ will reach £100 billion this year. In addition, over the last five years, the total turnover of all companies in the sector has steadily grown at around six per cent a year.

    The total turnover of all businesses in the hospitality industry reached £98 billion in 2017, up from £92 billion in 2016 and £86 billion in 2015. Based on this rate of growth, Adia expects this figure to comfortably reach £100 billion in the ONS’ 2018 data, which is expected to be published in the autumn.

    Adia’s analysis of government business population estimates has also revealed that the amount of people employed in the sector now exceeds 2.3 million, representing an increase of 21 per cent compared to 2013 – when the total amount of people working in the industry stood at 1.9 million.

    Encouragingly, the amount of firms providing accommodation and food services activities in the UK has grown by just under 20 per cent in the last five years, having reached 202,060 – up from 169,235 in 2013.

    Adia CEO, Ernesto Lamaina comments: “The hospitality sector makes a significant and important contribution to British economic output, equally, the 202,000 businesses operating in the industry play a valuable role as employers and job creators.

    “Our analysis indicates that the amount of people working in the sector has increased by over 409,000 in the last five years, which is testament to the health of the industry. However, as we’re seeing across the entire economy – the way we’re working and employing is changing. Employees expect flexibility and often, employers require it – businesses must respond to that.

    “We believe the ‘now economy’ is a system where companies can more efficiently manage staffing costs, and people are free to pursue the roles they want.”

    Adia is Adecco’s online recruitment solution that has the technology, scale and expertise to deliver what businesses need to thrive in the now economy, helping to find and manage temporary talent while building better practices for a new way of working.

    Launched in Switzerland in 2016, Adia is now available across the UK providing temporary talent to the hospitality industry.

    *Business population estimates for the UK and regions provides the only official estimate of the total number of private sector businesses in the UK at the start of each year.

    These estimates produced by BEIS cover a wider range of businesses than Office for National Statistics (ONS) outputs, which report on VAT traders and PAYE employers.

    Vienna top business destination in Europe alongside London

    London, Vienna top destinations for business in Europe

    958 510 Guest Blog

    Business trips are a possible indicator of economic growth. If the volume of business travel increases or falls in certain regions, it is possible to draw conclusions about the economy there…

    London and Vienna are the most popular business destinations in Europe. Outside Europe, European business travelers travel most frequently to New York and Shanghai.

    BC Travel analysed data connected to business travel and published the results in the latest issue of “Cities & Trends Report”. The report is based on flight booking data from eight major business travel markets in Europe: Belgium, Germany, France, Ireland, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

    Compared to 2015, there were only minor changes in the ranking of the most popular business destinations in Europe. Top performers in terms of cities are London, Vienna and Amsterdam.

    London hotelsThanks to an increase of 7.1% in air travel to Barcelona, the city climbed from 9th to 6th place. Madrid is the second Spanish city in the ranking with an increase – 14.9%. It is the number one jumper and has moved to 8th place. The increase in flights to the two Spanish cities is linked to the recovery of the Spanish economy, which grew by 3.2% in 2016.

    In terms of countries, the UK is on top, with Germany and Spain in second and third, respectively. Intercontinental trips from Europe are on the rise. New York and Shanghai remain the first and second in terms of intercontinental business destinations for European business travelers. In 2016, Dubai has overtaken Beijing and Singapore with an increase of 7.5% compared to the previous year.

    One of the reason for this is the fact that Dubai is preparing for the World Expo 2020. Many affordable hotels are opening, making it a less expensive place to hold meetings and events.

    Country-wise, the United States remain on top of business travel preferences. Developing countries China and India come second and third, respectively. Most business trips take place after the summer holidays in September (9.5%). Due to the holidays, December is the least frequented month (5.6%).

    Originally from Tourism Review, read here… 

    StayWell Hospitality

    StayWell Hospitality embarking on UK expansion drive

    721 380 Daniel Fountain

    Australian-owned Hotel Management Company StayWell Hospitality Group is staying true to its plans of global expansion by entering into a partnership with renowned United Kingdom hospitality company Fiveways Hospitality.

    The newly formed Master Licensing Agreement between the two parties will enable StayWell Hospitality Group to significantly grow its Park Regis and Leisure Inn brands within the UK market.

    StayWell Hospitality Group CEO Mr Simon Wan said that entering this agreement will help to secure an additional four hotels in the region within the next 48 months which is part of the groups overarching plan to reach 100 hotels globally within the next three years.

    The United Kingdom and Europe as a whole, presents a great opportunity for our Park Regis and Leisure Inn brands, especially after the successful opening of Park Regis Birmingham in March 2016, Mr Wan said.

    Fiveways Hospitality has a well established reputation and our partnership will deliver not only opportunities for further growth for StayWell in new destinations and cities but also offer top-shelf operational support to our hotel teams within the region, he said.

    Fiveways Hospitality Managing Director, Stuart Broster also agrees that the brands future within Europe looks bright following the formalisation of the partnership agreement.

    Radisson Blu, Edinburgh

    Radisson Blu, Edinburgh

    772 500 Daniel Fountain

    With all due respect to any of our readers who hail from the cities of Bath and Durham, I will tell anyone who will listen that I believe Edinburgh is the UK’s prettiest city. The breathtaking countryside to its south, its cobbled roads, its wonderfully archaic side-streets and UNESCO World Heritage-protected buildings – the Scottish capital is one of our country’s gems; always worth a visit and definitely worth celebrating.

    As someone who takes notice of such things for a living, design and architecture play a big part in the city’s allure. From Holyrood Palace to the famous castle and back up again around the Royal Mile, there are so many fantastic examples of both. With such striking and beautiful architecture at every turn, it figures that more modern projects – namely a Radisson Blu hotel – have to incorporate these stunning surroundings into their external appearance.

    This branch of the slick, business-minded brand ticks that box perfectly. Its neo-gothic, castle-esque exterior blends in with uniform ease to the rest of the street’s aesthetic. However, having paid homage to the city’s history on the outside, a reflection of a much more modern, corporate Edinburgh is revealed once inside. After a series of touch-ups and refurbishments since the turn of the century, the hotel’s interior looks very much ahead rather than to the past.

    When I arrive after a picturesque, but very long drive, I do have to manoeuvre my way around a rather complex route from carpark to lobby via a service lift. It’s here I am reminded how important – but sometimes overlooked – well-appointed signage is for guests. It’s not an ideal first impression to begin with, but I needn’t have worried as the rest of the hotel more than made up for it.

    Radisson Blu, Edinburgh lounge area (TripAdvisor)

    My roundabout tour of the lower levels takes me via the hotel’s main conference space – which is currently in turn-around mode between events when I sneak a peek. The room is a wonderful burst of monochrome tones in both carpets and wallcoverings, a clash of prints and the first sight I get of the ubiquitous locally-inspired artwork; it forms part of the eight meeting rooms the hotel offers, hosting up to 240 people for a range of event styles.

    Radisson Blu, Edinburgh Meeting space

    I am greeted at a busy but well-staffed reception area which also serves as an anchoring point between the hotel lounge-cum-breakout area and the food and beverage option Itchycoo Bar and Kitchen. One quick, seamless check-in later and I’m in my Business Class room – a room of the same standard as I stayed in when reviewing the Radisson Blu in Leeds, but one with a very different decor. It’s always fascinating to see how amenities remain the same, but how varied and different interpretations of the same brief can be. While Leeds relied on a metallic-inspired, blue-grey palette, Edinburgh goes for a more muted colour scheme of greys and browns in the bedroom and bathroom; with a splash of colour added by brightly-upholstered cushions.

    Radisson Blu, Edinburgh bedroom

    The living area is slightly smaller than I would normally expect for the price-range, but can be forgiven due to the fact the designers have managed to include everything required – and more – through good use of space. The room is dominated by the sweeping corner sofa unit, the double bed with its striking metallic headboard as well as the beautiful black-and-white artwork wallcovering of Edinburgh’s cityscape – it’s one of the better examples of a technique very much in vogue at the moment. If this is a taster of where Radisson Blu is headed with its BluPrint interior design concept, I can’t wait to see it rolled out across its global portfolio.

    Other pleasing touches are the wall-mounted TV set into the wall, a decent-sized dressing mirror and a modest desk unit with ample lighting and thoughtfully-placed sockets – this is a business-oriented hotel after all. The bathroom is tastefully fitted out, predominated by dark wooden finishes and simple but elegant bathroom fittings. So far, very good.

    Radisson Blu, Edinburgh bathroom detail

    I decide to take a look at the hotel’s brand new pool and health club – it had opened mere days before my stay – which on the way to the lower levels also gives me a chance to assess the marked difference between the newly refurbished corridors and the pictures I’d seen prior to them being redone. Of particular note were the carpets as I’d been warned by colleagues in the industry of the less-than-acceptable state of them beforehand, but was pleased to see a sterling job has been done in making sure of the quality during the refurb (see above).

    EDIT: The carpets throughout the hotel were provided by Newhey Carpets, who have built up a strong working relationship with the Radisson brand. They worked with Herefordshire-based Trevillion Interiors on the rooms and suites as well as the meeting rooms and event spaces. The designs were all created using Newhey’s state-of-the-art Colortec+ technology. Find out more here.

    And the good news continued when I took a look at the Melrose Spa and the Health Club. This is a fantastic example of leisure design – clean lines, soft finishes and brilliant use of lighting create the soothing and relaxed environment so required of such a space. While this is open to the public, considering a good number of the guests will be corporate only in town for a day or two – having this facility will give the Radisson Blu real pulling power in a competitive city market.

    Itchycoo at Radisson Blu, Edinburgh

    After a long day travelling up from Hertfordshire, I enjoy a cocktail or two and dinner in the Itchycoo Bar and Kitchen (FULL REVIEW HERE) – the décor of which further reflects the business orientation of the hotel. But much like the mixture of the clientele in the restaurant that evening, to say this Radisson Blu can, does or will solely cater for the corporate guest is to underestimate its appeal. Indeed, tourists contribute some £1.6 billion to the Edinburgh economy each year and this Radisson’s location will make it a popular choice for several of the 4 million+ annual visitors to the Scottish capital.

    Believe me, this hotel won’t stir any great reactions for its design or décor – but its fantastic functionality, comfortable and practical finish and more-than-ample amenities will ensure it remains a reliable choice for guests – either corporate or leisure…

    Based on a stay in April 2016
    radissonblu.com/en/hotel-edinburgh
    Photos: Daniel Fountain & Radisson Blu, Edinburgh TripAdvisor