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    London Design Festival medal winners announced

    730 565 Hamish Kilburn
    London Design Festival medal winners announced

    London Design Festival has announced the four winners of the 2019 London Design Medals…

    Launched with the aim to recognise the contribution made by the leading design figures and emerging talents in London and the industry, London Design Festival historically kicks-off the week-long design event by presenting four London Design Medals awarded.

    The 2019 medals were presented yesterday at The House of Commons, Westminster, while the capital came to life for the start of this year’s design spectacular.

    And the winners are…

    London Design Medal: Tom Dixon OBE
    Design Innovation Medal: Daniel Charny
    Emerging Design Medal: Ross Atkin
    Lifetime Achievement Medal: Dame Vivienne Westwood

    A panel of established designers, industry commentators and previous winners met to debate and judge the possible recipients of the four medals. This year’s jury members were: Ozwald Boateng OBE, Ian Callum CBE, Sheridan Coakley, Njusja de Gier, Es Devlin OBE, Sarah Douglas, Ben Evans CBE, Dr Tristram Hunt, Domenic Lippa, Jay Osgerby OBE, Raoul Shah, Joff Sharpe, Justine Simons OBE, Sir John Sorrell CBE, Dr Paul Thompson and Jane Withers.

    “Each year the jury selects four eminent people who have made a major contribution to design in the UK,” said Ben Evans CBE, London Design Festival Director. “This year the winners are as interesting and deserving as ever.”

    Tom Dixon OBE

    The London Design Medal, supported by British Airways London City, is the highest accolade bestowed upon an individual who has distinguished themselves within the industry and demonstrated consistent design excellence.

    This year’s winner, Tom Dixon, rose to prominence in the mid 1980s as a self-taught British designer. He set up the creative think-tank space, which acted as a shop front for himself and other young designers. By the late 1980s, he was working for Cappellini, for which he designed the iconic S chair. In the late 1990s, Dixon became Creative Director at Habitat and was responsible for rejuvenating the brand while maintaining Terence Conran’s vision of enriching everyday life through simple, modern design.

    His works have been acquired by museums across the globe, including the V&A, MoMA and the Pompidou Centre. In 2002 Dixon established his own eponymous brand with own stores in New York, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, Milan and Tokyo. More than 600 products are created by the company, ranging from lighting to furniture, from tableware through to fragrance, and are distributed to over 90 countries.

    In 2007 Dixon launched Design Research Studio, an interior and architectural design studio. High‑profile projects include the Restaurant at the Royal Academy, Shoreditch House, le Drugstore in Paris and Alto in Hong Kong. In 2018, Dixon opened the Coal Office, his new London Headquarters, in King’s Cross. Created by Design Research Studio, the Coal Office functions as a multi-displinary hub, including an office, restaurant, design studio and shop all under one roof.

    “I’m still confused as to why I won’t be getting the ‘Emerging Design Medal’,” said Dixon on the news of his win, “as it still feels very much like I have only just started – I’ve so much left to design! But I’m very touched to be noticed by this super Jury, thank you very much.”

    Daniel Charny

    Design Innovation Medal, supported by SAP, celebrates entrepreneurship in all its forms, both locally and internationally. It honours an individual for whom design lies at the core of their development and success.

    Daniel Charny is a creative director, curator and educator with an inquiring mind and an entrepreneurial streak. He is co-founder of the creative consultancy From Now On, where clients include Dartington Hall, the Design Museum, Google, Heatherwick Studio, Nesta and U+I. His most recent initiative is the creative education think-and-do-tank FixEd.

    Charny is best known as curator of the influential exhibition Power of Making at the V&A, which drove him to found the award-winning learning programme Fixperts, now taught in universities and schools worldwide. Other projects include the Aram Gallery, the British Council’s Maker Library Network and the Central Research Laboratory accelerator. As Professor of Design at Kingston University he is interested in the roles of design and making for social benefit.

    Charny is active internationally as a speaker and expert advisor, advocating his vision of design, creativity and making as essential tools to unlock a better future.

    “Engagement, education and access to design are all critical to assuring the creative responses to a changing world that we all need,” said Daniel Charny. “I’m proud to represent this idea and delighted to be recognised for it in London, a city of unparalleled creativity.”

    Ross Atkin

    Emerging Design Medal supported by Storey, recognises an impact made on the design scene within five or so years of graduation.

    Ross Atkin is a designer and engineer based in east London. His work focuses on two areas: helping disabled people to live more independently, and introducing design and engineering to children.

    He maintains his own design and development practice, creating assistive technology and accessibility-focused products that span the digital-physical divide. These include: Sight Line, a system for improving the accessibility of roadworks developed in partnership with The Royal Society for Blind Children and Transport for London; MSE Genie, an app and connected hardware that allows a sensory room to be tailored around the needs and capabilities of the person using it; Responsive Street Furniture, a system created in partnership with Marshalls that enables pieces of urban infrastructure to provide assistance automatically, such as by making street lighting brighter, or by lengthening the duration of road-crossing signals; Smartibot, the world’s first A.I. enabled carboard robot; and LiftCheck, a system that allows lift users to see if the lifts they need to complete their journey are operational before they set off.

    Atkin’s design practice is heavily informed by observational research. He regularly conducts participatory shadowing of disabled people as they make journeys around cities.

    “I never thought the kind of work that I do would be recognised, so I feel doubly honoured,” said Ross Atkin. “It’s beyond my imagination to be in the company of true legends of design, and it also is an amazing privilege to be representing the world of inclusive design on such a prominent platform as London Design Festival. I look forward to more designers from that world being recognised in the future”.

    Dame Vivienne Westwood

    Lifetime Achievement Medal Winner supported by Fortnum & Mason, honours a significant and fundamental contribution to the design industry over the course of a career.

    Vivienne Westwood was born in 1941 and moved to London 17 years later. She began designing in 1971 along with her then partner, Malcolm McLaren. In 1984, she launched her own fashion line and in 2004 the V&A hosted a Vivienne Westwood retrospective to celebrate her 34 years in fashion – the largest exhibition ever devoted to a living British fashion designer.

    Westwood has always used her collections and catwalk shows as a platform for activism. She has personally spent many years speaking out about the effects of climate change and over‑consumption – and inaugurated the ‘Climate Revolution’ at the 2012 London Paralympics closing ceremony.

    Along with husband and design partner Andreas Kronthaler, Westwood actively supports the charity Cool Earth in its efforts to halt rainforest destruction. She has also campaigned for a number of NGOs and charities including the Environmental Justice Foundation and Friends of the Earth, and is an ambassador for Greenpeace: in 2013 she designed their official ‘Save the Arctic’ logo.

    Since 2011 Westwood has worked with the International Trade Centre – a joint body of the UN – to produce accessories through their Ethical Fashion Initiative. The programme currently supports the work of thousands of women from marginalised African communities. Westwood has written her ideas in a manifesto called ‘Active Resistance to Propaganda’, rooted in culture as a stimulus to save the planet, and more recently designed a set of playing cards to set out a global economic strategy to stop climate change.

    Main image credit: LDF 2019

    THE BRIT LIST 2019: Nominations are open and FREE to apply

    730 565 Hamish Kilburn
    THE BRIT LIST 2019: Nominations are open and FREE to apply

    FREE TO APPLY: Nominations for The Brit List 2019, which are NOW OPEN, will close on August 9… 

    The Brit List 2019 is back, once again launching its nationwide search to find Britain’s leading interior designers, hoteliers and architects. Nominations are now open and, what’s more, the process in which to apply for The Brit List 2019 remains completely free.

    Simply click here to apply/nominate.

    Following popular demand, this year’s awards will also include a dedicated supplier category with the aim to recognise, celebrate and support British manufacturers.

    Once all nominations have been received by the closing date of August 9, the judging panel – made up of figures from across the hospitality, design and architecture sectors – will select the final 75 most inspirational and influential people in British design, hotels and architecture, as well as selecting this year’s individual winners of the following awards:

    • Interior Designer of the Year
    • Architect of the Year
    • Hotelier of the Year
    • Best in Tech
    • The Eco Award 
    • Best in British Product Design – NEW CATEGORY FOR 2019
    • Outstanding Contribution to the Hospitality Industry

    “We have, yet again, deliberately kept nominations for The Brit List 2019 free for all to apply in order to maintain a fair opportunity for all designers, hoteliers, architects and suppliers who believe they deserve to be profiled in The Brit List 2019,” – Hamish Kilburn, editor of Hotel Designs.

    On November 21, the shortlisted finalists of designers, hoteliers, architects as well as key suppliers to the industry will gather at Patch East, London where The Brit List 2019 will be unveiled along with the individual winners . “We have, yet again, deliberately kept nominations for The Brit List 2019 free for all to apply in order to maintain a fair opportunity for all designers, hoteliers, architects and suppliers who believe they deserve to be profiled in The Brit List 2019,” explains Hamish Kilburn, editor of Hotel Designs. “As a judge, I am personally looking forward to leading another nationwide search in order to find and platform exceptional creative thinkers who are operating or manufacturing in Britain today.” Patch East, London is a fabulous venue for our non-traditional awards ceremony, and we look forward to welcoming the industry’s finest for a night of celebration and high-profile networking.”

    Early-bird tickets for the award ceremony are now available to purchase: 

    Suppliers: £99 + VAT (£150 + VAT after early bird offer expires after August 4)
    Designers, hoteliers, developers and architects: £10 + VAT (£20 + VAT after early bird offer expires after August 4)

    Please click here if you are a supplier to the industry to secure your ticket NOW!

    Please click here if you are either a designer, hotelier, developer or architect and secure your ticket NOW!

    The judges for The Brit List 2019

    Last year’s winners of The Brit List, who were crowned at an exclusive drinks evening in London, included Martin Brudnizki from Martin Brudnizki Design Studio, Conor O’Leary from Gleneagles and Robin Sheppard from Bespoke hotels, among many others.

    Please note that there is NO FEE to nominate and/or apply for The Brit List 2019. 

    Headline Partner: Crosswater

    Event Partner: Hamilton Litestat:

    Industry Partner: BIID:

    In Conversation With: Harriet Forde, the up-coming President of the BIID

    730 565 Hamish Kilburn
    In Conversation With: Harriet Forde, the up-coming President of the BIID

    Editor Hamish Kilburn heads backstage to join Harriet Forde, the interior designer waiting in the wings to become the President of the British Institute of Interior Design (BIID)…

    As far as interviewing a leading designer goes, I have never, until now at least, agreed to meet in a converted traditional men’s public toilet in London. Surprisingly, though, The Attendant in Fitzrovia turns out to be the perfect quirky backdrop for such an occasion.

    The underground coffee shop instantly tells me two things about the designer before I have even managed to ask my first question. The first being that the soon-to-be president of the British Institute of Interior Design (BIID), Harriet Forde, does things differently. The second is that she has a thing about meeting in outlandish – almost kooky – locations because, and I quote: “Meetings like these should be fun, completely memorable and a bit out there.”

    Once I had got over the initial shock of us both sitting, propped up on statement green stools, in front of pristine-white restored urinals while listening to country-folk music, I was keen to understand how Forde plans to wear the shoes of her soon-to-be predecessor, The Brit List 2018 judge, Gilly Craft. “There’s only so much you can do and change in a year,” Forde says. “That’s why all three of us, the president elect (currently myself), the president (Gilly Craft) and past president (Charles Leon) all have an active role – and it really is a three-year commitment. Therefore Gilly, for example, will step down as president in a few months, but she will still be very much involved in decisions and responsibilities – which she never shies away from.”

    “British designers especially are not afraid to be experimental and they are arguably more willing to embrace the oddities.” – Harriet Forde.

    It has been said time and time again – and here it is once more for good measure – that Britain is an unparalleled design hub. Wearing her BIID hat, Forde is the first judge announced for The Brit List 2019, Hotel Designs’ nationwide search for the top interior designers, hoteliers and architects. Forde has her own opinions on why she believes the UK captures some of the world’s best design talent. “Although manufacturing is lacking in Britain, and it is very niche now, there is still a history of craft,” Forde explains. “Still to this day, while manufacturing abroad is cheaper, there are a handful of creative companies who are still making products from British factories, which is something we should encourage and celebrate more. British design has a cache, of sorts, which can be quirky. British designers especially are not afraid to be experimental and they are arguably more willing to embrace the oddities.”

    As well as preparing for her Presidency to commence, Forde is also the founder of Harriet Forde Design, a leading design firm that provides comprehensive interior design services and solutions for bars, restaurants, hotels, commercial properties and residential projects. “I very much try to take it one day at a time, using my diary planner to the best of my ability,” says Forde. “It’s a constant re-evaluation to identify the priority and it’s far too easy to over commit.”

    QUICK-FIRE ROUND

    HK: What’s your favourite type of hotel?
    HF: I love hotels that have a home-from-home feel, like Kit Kemp’s Firmdale Hotels.

    HK: What’s your number-one travel item?
    HF: A Cafetière and decaf grounded coffee, don’t ask.

    HK: What is your biggest bugbear within the industry
    HF: Lack of communication between consultants.

    HK: Who was your inspiration:
    HF: Olga Polizzi.

    HK: What trend is really inspiring you this year?
    HF: I am really into marble and to that end I am embarking on learning more about what creates different marble around the world. Italy is running dry with certain types of marble, so other stones are becoming more popular. That and thin porcelain tiles.

    HK: What do you hope to bring to your presidency?
    HF: What value a BIID membership can bring professionally, personally and creatively.

    HK: Sketches or renders?
    HF: A render with sketching, but that’s like choosing between humous and guacamole.

    HK: What would you do?
    HF: I would quite like to be a lighting designer.

    It seems as if Forde and I are on the same page when it comes to the limitless possibilities of lighting. “When I started as an interior design, we did our own lighting design as well as specifying the fittings,” she says. “Now, though, with the explosion of LED, it’s such a big world out there full of technical know-how. Therefore, more and more, we are working with lighting designers, on projects because they know what is technically possible and equally impossible.”

    Forde’s open approach to not just talking about but really discussing design is refreshing; she is a fountain of knowledge who will make for a strong yet personable president – just like her predecessor. As her choice in venue suggests, our next President of the BIID can spot a design gem from a mile away, which I am sure will stand her in good stead for the phase of her journey.

    Main image credit: Harriet Forde Designs

    IN THE FACTORY with Knightsbridge Furniture

    730 565 Hamish Kilburn
    IN THE FACTORY with Knightsbridge Furniture

    To stitch together how Knightsbridge makes its contract furniture, editor Hamish Kilburn travels up to Bradford in West Yorkshire to step inside the modern factory that chooses to do things the traditional way…

    Priding itself on being 100 per cent British-made is something that has become somewhat of a unique selling point for contract furniture company Knightsbridge.

    Giving ‘in-house’ a whole new meaning, every item that has a Knightsbridge logo on it was conceptualised, sketched, prototyped and produced in the hearty West Yorkshire town of Bradford – and has been for 80 years.

    In an average week, around 700 items of furniture are made in the Victorian factory – and all pieces start as nothing more than a stacked load of timber or Birch plywood, which is imported from Russia and Europe. While many factories internationally have chosen to use automated machinery to carve their frames, Knightsbridge is among the minority that still, to this day, cuts its materials by the hands of skilled workers. “Many of our employees come through the apprenticeship scheme, which is something we are very proud of,” said Craig Weston, Operations Manager at Knightsbridge. “Because everything at Knightsbridge is handmade and hand-cut, the role in the factory therefore requires a very specific set of skills, which isn’t easy to teach just anyone.”

    Stack of timber

    Image credit: Knightsbridge Furniture

    As we walk from process to process, I notice that an arm of a chair starting to take form. “This is one of the most difficult pieces we make,” says Weston who points to the worker on the cutter who is meticulously carving out detailed incisions. “As a strategy, we ensure that we always have a higher stock of the items that are more complex to produce.” With high demand for Knightsbridge products and limited facilities, this is a resourceful method that reduces the possibility of delays in the manufacturing process.

    Contract chair in the process of being upholstered

    Image credit: Knightsbridge Furniture

    Once each frame is cut, sanded, assembled, tinted, polished and dried, it is then ready for the upholstery process. On average, it takes the team at Knightsbridge approximately one hour to upholster a typical sofa. As the demand in hotel interior design renovations increases, the company also offers a reupholstery service whereby it will reupholster any piece of furniture (even if it’s not a Knightsbridge product). The cluster of seamstresses working is impressive and the decision to keep a cap on fabric stock is reassuring. “To reduce waste and save space, we only stock as much material as we need in this area,” Weston explains. “What’s more, although we have colour and fabric options, we will match any colour the client wants.”

    Seamstress working

    Image credit: Knightsbridge Furniture

    Elsewhere in the factory, away from the main production line, is the design and development team. Led by Director Jason Brown, who lives and breathes by the ethos that you can’t turn down the volume on creativity, the soul of the factory is my home-from-from during my visit. “I have every furniture designers’ dream job, right?” laughs Brown. “It’s such a privilege being able to have all the tools, kit and skills to be able to prototype products in-house.” Brown is a man after my own heart who seems to wear many hats in his role. “The most obvious element to my role is that I sketch and design the future collections,” he explains. “But what most people perhaps don’t know is that my team, which is magic by the way, also have to provide the factory workers with all the technical drawings when we start producing a new product. As you can imagine, there is no margin for error in this department. We are always looking for new ways to be innovative, while being mindful of time, quality and cost for the overall business.” For Brown, like all great designers, thinking creatively and thinking commercially are difficult plates to spin at the same time. “It’s a challenge, but that’s why I love it,” he adds.

    Despite Knightsbridge having the ultimate in-house design dream team, led by a visionary who clearly leads within the pack, the company is also proud to work with outside influences when designing future products. The latest collaborations to come out the factory include the likes of John Coleman, Sean Dare, Jim Hamilton and David Fox.

    Knightsbridge is a modern company like no other. Proud of its heritage and confident to push boundaries, it seems as if this British-born company has all the materials, workforce and ideas – all stored under one roof – to lead the contract furniture market into another 80 successful years of business.

    BRITISH STYLE: Questioning design like Ilse Crawford

    730 565 Hamish Kilburn
    BRITISH STYLE: Questioning design like Ilse Crawford

    To launch the new chapter of Hotel Designs, Hamish Kilburn investigates how one woman, her editorship and her questions over convention helped to change modern international hotel design by challenging the very foundations it sits on…

    Every now and then, the world is introduced to a design icon who, through making their visions into reality, helps to shift attitudes by challenging conventional forms.

    For Ilse Crawford, the founding Editor-In-Chief of British Elle Decoration, the design world was somewhat lacking reference of everyday movement when she decided to step into the shoes of her designer readers.

    In 1997, a decade on from founding British Elle Decoration, Crawford asked the world to “liberate your senses and change your life” when she published her first book, Sensual Home, which mapped out how the living environment can engage us sensually as well as visually from the perspective of sight, sound, taste, touch and smell. And was, for Crawford, the start of a new journey.  “Writing the book was the ‘ah-hah’ moment, because it wasn’t the current understanding of design,” she explained in the Netflix documentary, Abstract: The Art of Design. “The days of being a two-dimensional person were over.”

    The defiant leap from narrator to creator came one year later after she signed off as Editor-In-Chief. Having completed her mission to launch a contemporary magazine for a wide audience, Crawford worked for Donna Karan and getting her hands dirty, she became a maker. Crawford’s first hotel interior design brief was presented to her immediately after she left Elle Decoration when she was asked to convert a stately home for Nick Jones of Soho House into what we now know of as Babington House. “Nick originally wanted this place to look and feel like a stately home, but I was very clear that that’s the last thing it should be,” Crawford explained in Abstract: The Art of Design. “My proposal was that it should be a very informal place where you could just treat as if it was your own, like a family house of a friend where the parents had gone away and left the key the drinks cabinet.” Breaking the rules of the time, Crawford’s design stole the headlines and her journey as an interior design began.

    “The project saw the transformation of a former industrial building in the Meatpacking district into a 27-key design hotel.”

    From the rural British countryside to the bustling scene of Manhattan, Crawford’s skillful and sensitive approach was called upon to create the first outpost of Soho House outside the UK. The project saw the transformation of a former industrial building in the Meatpacking district into a 27-key design hotel, including bars, a restaurant, cinema and rooftop pool. Soho House New York opened to become the definitive third space for the transatlantic media crowd.

    Her aim as an interior designer is to put human needs and desires at the centre of all that she does. Working in commercial and residential design, and blurring the lines between both, Crawford has changed many environments for the better of those who use them. Ett Hem Hotel was a conversion project of a former arts and crafts building. The 12-key guesthouse is described by Crawford as “a place to stay for the modern traveller, a home-from-home, where flexibility of space and function is central to the hotel’s operation,” she says. “There is no division between front and back of house – anything can happen anywhere at any time.”

    Residential style in the hotel

    Image caption/credit: Ett Hem Hotel. Interiors by Ilse Crawford

    As someone who truly lives and breathes the industry in which she used to curate on the pages of Elle Decoration, Crawford wears many hats as a modern designer. In her own admission to Interior Design magazine, she confessed that “the line between my work and life is thin to non-existent.”  Working from her London studio, which is directly below her home, Crawford’s knowledge in interiors has allowed her to extend her portfolio to include product design. The Sinnerlig Collection for IKEA includes 30 pieces of of furniture, lighting and tabletop collection. “They explore natural materials and are simple,” Crawford explains on her website. “They are helpful, background pieces, not showstoppers.” Tactile materials such as cork, ceramic, glass, seagrass and bamboo appealed in the design concept because they felt as good as they looked.

    “Maison&Objet awarded Crawford the prestigious title of Designer of the Year 2016.”

    The Together Table was another design that challenged existing products on the market. Confronting the design of conventional four-cornered tables, Crawford simply rounded the edges of the table, which as a result naturally invited people to move around it more freely.  The Ilse Sofa was the result of a collaboration with British furniture brand George Smith. The height and depth of the product’s arms and back were calculated and tested to ensure that the sofa supports as many sedentary habits of modern life. “We like to think of it as a room within a room,” Crawford explains when describing the tactile experience.

    Beige modern, long, thin table

    Image caption/credit: The Together Table by Ilse Crawford

    Two years after she was awarded an MBE in recognition for her work in design, Maison&Objet awarded Crawford the prestigious title of Designer of the Year 2016. Since then, the modest designer has continued to evolve the hospitality landscape with completing projects such as The Lounge Plaza 66, Cathy Pacific’s iconic airport lounge in Hong Kong and the warm and inviting home-from-home that is Bukowskis.

    Crawford’s philosophical visions to challenge the norm leaves a clear path for young designers who aspire, like her, to make a difference through design. As the founder of the department of Man and Wellbeing at the Design Academy Eindhoven, Crawford’s mission as a visionary is explained on her website as “nurturing a new generation of students to always question why and how their work improves the reality of life.” Her philosophy to improve the future through considered design is what makes her the leader she undoubtably is today. Her work – and her working style – is a simple, effortless reflection of the questions she asks of the designs of today and the possibilities that are garnered by second guessing what the future should look and feel like.

    Crawford, an ever-evolving icon of British and international design, has metaphorically cut the ribbon to launch Hotel Designs’ new website by being the subject of the first editorial feature of the title’s new era. The newly launched slogan “defining the point of international design” is a pledge from the editorial team to its readers to cut through the noise to publish conversation starters that will filter into many debates on the hotel design scene that we all know and love. That conversation starts here, with a question that Crawford asks herself when confronted with a new project: “How can design strategically make things better?”

    Main image credit: Ilse Crawford/StudioIlse

    Brit List 2018 long list announced

    1024 566 Hamish Kilburn
    This year’s Brit List has officially announced the 2018 long list as it heads towards the final straight to finding Britain’s top interior designers, hoteliers and architects…

    Hotel Designs has announced the long-listed interior designers, hoteliers and architects that are all in with a chance of making it into The Brit List 2018.

    The long-listed finalists will be invited to BEAT London on November 22 when The Brit List 2018 will be unveiled to highlight the top 25 interior designers, top 25 hoteliers and the top 25 architects in Britain today.

    The nationwide search began months ago when Hotel Designs opened up nominations to readers of the publication in order to enter whom they believed deserved to be recognised as British leaders and influencers in international hotel design.

    There are limited spaces available to attend this year’s highly anticipated event. In order to purchase your tickets and to secure your place, click here.

    Below are the long-listed candidates for this year’s Brit List.

    Contantina TsoutsikouHBA London
    Andrew LinwoodAreen Hospitality
    Ariane SteinbeckRPW Design
    Bee OsbornOsborn Interiors
    Emma KingInterContinental Group
    Dexter Moren AssociatesDexter Moren Associates
    Tim MurrayHelen Green Design
    Alex KravetzAlex Kravetz Design
    Fiona ThompsonRichmond International
    Martin BrudnizkiMBDS
    Rachel JohnsonWimberly Interiors
    Terry McGinnityGA Design London
    Jo LittlefairGoddard Littlefair
    Kelly HoppenKelly Hoppen Design Interiors Ltd
    Maria VafiadisMKV Design
    Christopher AshProject Orange
    Katherine NeathercoatScott Brownrigg
    Tara BernerdTara Bernerd & Partners
    Robert AngellRobert Angell Design International
    Helen FewsterSuna Interior Design
    Rebecca HuntSuna Interior Design
    Frances BlackhamTrevillion Interiors
    Harry HarrisSUSD
    Stephanie DennettBrakspear
    Nicholas StoupasTwenty2Degrees
    Joesph StellaTwenty2Degrees
    Tom BartlettWaldo Works
    Harry GregoryAra Design
    Rock GalpinRock Galpin Ltd
    Kathleen HockneyCole & Son
    Nicholas SunderlandNSI Design Ltd
    Kim PartridgeKim Partridge Interiors
    Rami FustokThe Mandrake
    Conor O’LearyGleneagles, Scotland
    Jenny OhKing Street Townhouse
    Johnson JosephLALIT, London
    Brian BensonThe Gainsborough
    Mario OvsenjakHotel Gotham
    Jasdeep SodhiHotel Indigo, 1 Leicester Square
    Robin SheppardBespoke Hotels
    Jennifer McCabeCharlotte Street Hotel
    Fiona MooresThe Pig at Combe
    Faye StoneThe Pig in the Wall
    Sarah HoldenThe Pig near Bath
    Peter KienastThe Principle, Manchester
    Michael AchenbaumThe Curtain, London
    Gareth BannerThe Ned, London
    Thomas KochsThe Corinthia, London
    Michael BonsorThe Rosewood, London
    David Morgan-HewittThe Goring, London
    Kevin BrookeCliveden House
    Nick HansonIdle Rocks Hotel, St Mawes
    Will AshworthWatergate Hotel
    Marco NovellaThe Lanesborough
    Nathan WhiteSeaham Hall
    Paul WalshHotel Football
    Mark SainsburyZetter Hotels
    Michael HellingThe Grove, Hertfordshire
    Barney CunliffeThe Gilpin
    Sergio LeandroMondrian London
    Chris WeaverHigh Road House
    Debrah DhuggaDukes Hotel
    James TwomeyReardon Smith
    Gordon Ferrier3D Reid Architecture
    Richard MortonRichard Morton Architects
    James DilleyJestico + Whiles
    Julian DickensJestico + Whiles
    Liz PickardConsarc Architects
    Martin PeaseWATG
    David Richard MellorDavid Richard Mellor
    John SimpsonJohn Simpson Architects
    Maha KutayZaha Hadid Architects
    Woody YaoZaha Hadid Architects
    Tommy LeePLP Architecture
    Phil JaffaScape Design Associates
    Georgia StevensonSHH Architects and Interior Designers
    Tom LindblomGensler
    Richard Hywel EvansStudio RHE
    Caroline SmithWish London
    Yasmin MahmoudiehYasmine Mahmoudieh
    Jonathan ManserThe Manser Practice
    Nathalie RozencwajgRare Architecture
    Mark BruceEPR Architects
    Geoff HullEPR Architects
    David ArcherArcher Humphreys Architects
    Howard JonesArcher Humphreys Architects
    Abinitio Architects & PlannersAbinitio Architects & Planners

    This year, as well as celebrating The Brit List 2018, the awards will launch six coveted awards. These include:

    • Inspiration in Design – Innovative use of Technology
    • Inspiration in Design – Boutique Hotelier
    • Inspiration in Design – Interior Designer of the Year
    • Inspiration in Design – Architect of the Year
    • The Eco Award
    • Outstanding Contribution to the Hotel Industry

    Shortlist finalists: Inspiration in Design – Innovative use of Technology

    • Meystyle – Product: LED wallpaper and fabric
    • Moritz Waldemeyer – Product: LDF18 Lighting installation
    • Aquavision
    • Criton
    • ACT STUDIOS
    • Hotel Room Chooser

    Shortlist finalists: The Eco Award

    • Tate Harmer – Project: Eden Hotel
    • Deadgood – Project: Hug Chair
    • Interface  – Product: All products
    •  Ecolight
    • Zetter Hotels

    Event timings: 6.30 p.m. – 10.30 p.m.

    6.30 p.m. Welcome drinks are served
    7.00 p.m. Welcome speech from Hotel Designs Editor, Hamish Kilburn, to include unveiling of The Brit List 2018 winners
    7.15 p.m. Canapés are served
    7.15 p.m. Headline speaker addresses The Brit List 2018
    7.30 p.m. Awards presentation commences
    8.00 p.m. Headline speaker addresses The Brit List 2018
    8.15 p.m. Celebrations and networking

    In order to secure you place, click here to purchase tickets. 

    To discuss the various sponsorship packages available, please contact Katy Phillips on +44(0)1992 374050

    BRIT LIST 2018 Industry partner: British Institute of Interior Design

    SPOTLIGHT ON: Handmade British furniture range launches to add statement

    Hamish Kilburn

    AS HOTEL DESIGNS CONTINUES TO FOCUS ITS LENS ON FURNITURE THIS MONTH, ONE COMPANY’S HANDMADE BRITISH PRODUCTS ARE MAKING A STATEMENT IN THE PUBLIC AREAS, GUESTROOMS AND HOTEL CORRIDORS…

    Following the recent feature on how to add statement to your boutique hotel, furniture brand Sofas & Stuff has recently launched a new handmade British range of furniture called Occasional Chairs.

    Known as the Thistle and Port Isaac Chairs, each have been handmade in Britain and are available in any fabric to complement existing seating, or to create an occasional statement piece in any room.

    The classic design of the Port Isaac features elegant button back detailing with a wide plump base, meanwhile the Thistle is more contemporary in its design, making it ideal for accenting an interior scheme.

    Both the Thistle and Port Isaac are available in any fabric, and can be fully tailored to any requirements with a choice of sizes, cushion fillings and legs.

    The chairs are available to purchase in 12 nationwide and London stores, with a designated team of design experts all on hand to help.