Posts Tagged :

Bar

Designing Beijing’s newest destination bar

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Designing Beijing’s newest destination bar

The social hotspot bar Union, which is sheltered in The Opposite House  has been inspired by simple elegance and seamless hospitality in mind…

The Opposite House has announced the launch of UNION – a bar exuding eleganceand comfort, the free spirit of an artist’s studio infused with hospitality that curates the guest’s experience. With a 20th century modernist sensibility, showcasing artwork and objects in an environment reminiscent of International Expos and drinks inspired by the ancient Silk Road, the space responds to the versatility ofguest’s needs through time.

UNION was designed by leading, New York-based design firm, AvroKO. Since its launch in 2001, AvroKO hasearned a reputation as one of the most innovative design firms in the field, due in large part to the group’sintegrated design process and focus on creating emotionally connected experiences. Seemingly whimsical in nature, UNION was strategically designed to have a clear social flow; copper architectural frames and metal mesh sheets showcase artwork, sculptures and objects, drawing in and engaging guests, whilst hidden elements such as the bar trolley, spicery wall and DJ booths enable a seamless transition from day to night.

Designed by AvroKO’s Bangkok studio, the interiors were inspired by potter, Lucie Rie’s, 20th century modernist studio – a beautiful, yet versatile, space that was suited to living, working and socialising. With the simple elegance of well-executed hospitality in mind, they created a space that enables exceptional levels of service and functionality, without compromising the guest experience.

UNION aims to create a sense of belonging and discovery, evoking the sense of witnessing something for the first time. A balance of ceremony and warmth create a personal, authentic experience, whilst a carefully curated soundtrack allows the bar to seamlessly transition through day to night with the perfect eclectic mix of tempo, BPM, energy levels and genres.

UNION offers a refined experience that celebrates the flavours, ingredients, customs and drinking traditions of the Silk Road. A sophisticated drinks menu consists of an extensive wine list made up of 60 bins that are all available by the glass as well as selection of signature cocktails and alcohol-free drinks. The wine list changes monthly and whilst it features some well-known wineries the list is carefully curated to provide representation for lesser known producers, hard to find bottles and biodynamic wines

As for the signature cocktail list, it encapsulates a diverse range of flavours inspired by international tastes; non-alcoholic creations include Spring breeze (a representation of Eastern Chinese flavours) which haspear, vanilla, coconut, citric acid and sea salt , whilst the traditional cocktail menu includes highlights such as Genghis Khan Martini (Mongolian representation) with French Gin, Mongolia Milk Wine, Dry Vermouth, Elderflower, Coconut and Sea Salt.

The Opposite House, located in the Sanlitun district is an intriguing urban hotel designed by eminent Japanese architect, Kengo Kuma. Its contemporary style and abundance of space perfectly complement the refreshingly individual service. More new spaces will be unveiled throughout the remainder of 2019.

Main image credit: The Opposite House

New destination bar opens at revamped Hilton Hotel Münich City

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
New destination bar opens at revamped Hilton Hotel Münich City

While Hotel Designs continues its Spotlight On Bars & Restaurants, Hilton Hotel Münich City opens Juliet Rose, a new destination bar…

Interior design firm Goddard Littlefair has completed a striking new destination bar called Juliet Rose at the Hilton Hotel Münich City. The city’s new place-to-be bar was inspired by the F&B concept of unusual botanical extracts and the importance of process in the creation of its singular drinks.

The scheme was inspired by the F&B concept of unusual botanical extracts and the importance of process in the creation of its singular drinks, which includes a range of signature cocktails and what is said to be the best coffee in Munich. The result is an exciting and theatrical zoned space with an alchemical, laboratory feel; a perfect back-drop for outstanding drinks to be made and delivered. The scheme both stands out from and also works subtly in harmony with the overall hotel, which has also undergone a thorough revamp by the Goddard Littlefair team.

The bar’s name, Juliet Rose, is taken from one of the most elite roses in the world, developed over a 15-year period by renowned rose breeder David Austin. As well as lending the concept connotations of craftsmanship and the long-term pursuit of perfection, the ‘Rose’ reference will also be easily understood by a local audience as a nod to Rosenheimer Strasse, the street onto which the bar’s dedicated entrance faces, as well as the Rosenheimer Platz metro station, on top of which the hotel stands.

Modern restaurant and bar

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

The generously-apportioned, 90-seat, 180 sq m bar is located on the hotel’s ground floor, with easy access from both the hotel’s spacious new reception, as well as via its own dedicated Rosenheimer Strasse entrance, introduced to maximise passing trade. Customers can additionally access the hotel and bar directly from the metro station and an adjacent car park below, arriving via a special circulation route through the ground floor of the hotel, offering intriguing glimpses of the back of the bar through semi-opaque windows, so that the bar is referenced and announced from every possible angle.

Juliet Rose is made up of four different seating zones, each with different stand-out features, plus two bars. The main ‘ceremony bar’ is a stunning, monolithic U-shaped design that guests coming from the hotel entrance see as soon as they enter the space, at the far end of a central approach. A second, smaller-scale coffee bar is made of the same dramatic moss-green and highly-polished granite, with the choice of material referencing the earthiness of botanical ingredients. The granite for the main bar has been book-matched to ensure dramatic textural veining from the front. Above and behind the main bar, the gantry structure is made up of brass sections, with an industrial/lab feel, underscored by an apothecary-style bottle display. The barman prepares cocktails at its centre, making full use of dry ice, bell jars and a sense of reveal.

‘The overall design approach for the space was based on form and order, with drama, freedom and an opposing sense of randomness created by the furniture and accessorising’, architect David Lee Hood, Associate at Goddard Littlefair, explained. ‘When it came to structure, we added a number of new elements to the space to give a feeling of overall order and symmetry, whilst also ensuring playful visibility between zones via glazed screens offering varying privacy levels.’

As visitors arrive from the hotel down the entry circulation route for example, they pass between two large-scale, floor-to-ceiling screens (with added ‘peep holes’), where a brass-effect structure features ribbed glass OLED panels with a striking inset palm print. The screens were bespoke-manufactured for the project and are just one of many bespoke items that ensure design integrity and exclusivity for the project. A second highly striking screen-wall faces the hotel entrance lobby, passed by guests on their way to either the bar or front reception, and is made up of a brass shelving structure with glass backlit panels where a textured opaque manifestation gives the impression of a linen-style finish and plays with light. The structure is decorated on the inner side with judiciously-placed planting.

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

As the existing columns in the space are quite dominant, the design team made a feature of them by using new cladding and mirroring. An existing ceiling was removed so that the space’s full height could be used, with a dramatic new lighting structure that uses brass pipes and large, exposed lamps to add to the geometric, laboratory feel. Inset mirrors within the ceiling area reinforce the structure, as well as adding reflection and sparkle. Architectural lighting for the scheme was created together with DPA Lighting, whilst the stand-out decorative pieces were all bespoke-designed by Goddard Littlefair, with advice from DPA, and manufactured by Peters Design. As well as the overhead grid structure, these include a stand-out ‘test tube’ style pendant light located over the main bar and a number of vertical, glass-clad wall lights, which refer to the test-tube decorative light in style. A number of mid-wall lights throughout feature a circular fitting with a pole attachment to each side. These add layering and create a lower-level light source to bring light to the tables. Flooring throughout features stained oak timber surround and inset panels, made up of a geometric pattern of small white mosaic areas, plus larger slices set at interesting angles.

The four main seating zones include a casual drop-in area, directly to the left of the entrance, primarily for daytime use for coffee and cakes. Further casual seating is to the right, whilst the two sections further back and along both sides of the bar, for day or evening use, feature a mixture of seating types, as well as a communal high table, for groups, cocktails evenings and special events. Planting is used throughout, both for biophilic appeal and to underline the ‘botanical ingredients’ bar concept.

Furniture throughout includes sofas in bottle green leather and loose seating upholstered in pale oyster pink or else in deep orange leather with thin brass upstands and dark turquoise seat backs. Tables are either a marble-effect silestone, a brass-edged timber-topped design or, for the higher communal table, a series of easily-conjoined tables featuring a print taken from a magnified gold-veined leaf print, supplied by Fameed Khalique and manufactured by the lead contractor on the scheme, Engels.

luxurious bar with pendent lighting

Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Four windows which look directly out onto Rosenheimer Strasse, alongside the bar, feature a special chain-mail curtain with a clip detail, playing once again with light and screening, whilst effectively obscuring the busy street view and ensuring customers are enveloped by the bar’s atmosphere.

Located behind the street entrance to the bar, on the other side of a draft lobby area, are two stand-out pieces of bespoke-designed joinery: a waiter station and a moveable cocktail bar, both in high-gloss lacquer with blue-green tones to work well with the planting and moss-green granite bars. The cocktail bar has a removable top with ice and a sink inside so that it can be moved around to cater to guests anywhere in the space.

The hotel reception lobby that connects with the bar features a design treatment in keeping with the overall hotel design scheme, inspired by German Expressionism and particularly Der Blaue Reiter art movement, which had its origins in the city. Stand-out design features in the reception area include feature lighting loops, designed by Goddard Littlefair and manufactured by LED-C4; a high-gloss hexagonal mosaic-fronted reception desk with brass edging; a striking reception back-wall with a pale grey wallcovering and bronze effect vertical dividing strips; a marble fireplace area and artworks chosen by art consultants ARTIQ, taking a cue from the dynamism and strong colour of early 20th century German Expressionism, but updating that for today’s context, with new artworks commissioned for the hotel from contemporary artists. The artworks that lead towards Juliet Rose are partly-abstracted paintings which reference a more natural theme, in keeping with the F&B concept, with bold and interplaying curved lines.

Main image credit: Gareth Gardner

SPOTLIGHT ON: 10 inspirational hotel bars and restaurants

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
SPOTLIGHT ON: 10 inspirational hotel bars and restaurants

To kickstart our Spotlight On topic of Bars & Restaurants, Hotel Designs has scoured the globe to highlight hotel F&B gems that deserve to be recognised. Editor Hamish Kilburn edits…

In 2018, according to Technomic, overall consumer spending for hotel food and beverage showed a solid 5.5 percent annual growth since 2011. In design, architecture and in service, there is a clear move to produce instagrammable F&B areas.

While the overall dining and drinking experience is becoming somewhat of a theatrical performance, we have identified 10 hotels going above and beyond – in both design and service – to ensure that they are entertaining their customers’ ever-evolving demands.

Joali – Mura Bar (Maldives)

Beach blue wallcovering with wooden roof

Image credit: Joali – Mura Bar

Overlooking a pearly beach and pool that meets the sea, The Mura Bar is designed to encourage guests to naturally relax and unwind. The hotel’s entire construction was designed to build around its natural landscape. As a result, 1,000 trees were preserved in the process, creating luscious green scenes in a natural paradise.

Gleneagles – The American Bar (Scotland)

close up of plush light blue seating

Image credit: Gleneagles

With the aim to bring back the glamour and decadence of fine dining experiences of the 1920s and ’30s and redesign a legend, Gleneagles will in May 2019 unveil the relaunch of its famous restaurant, The Strathearn following a design transformation by Ennismore Design Studio.

Conrad Malives Ranhgali Island – Ithaa Undersea Restaurant (The Maldives)

The awarding winning underwater Ithaa sits five metres below the surface, offering 180-degree panoramic views of the vibrant coral gardens surrounding it. Ithaa (meaning ‘mother of pearl’ in the Maldivian language of Dhivehi) serves contemporary European cuisine in a six-course set dinner menu.

Since its opening in 2015, the restaurant has become an Instagram sensation and its popularity led to the concept of opening the world’s first underwater hotel suite.

Hotel Gotham, Manchester – Club Brass (United Kingdom)

Image credit: Hotel Gotham

Poised to become the backdrop of Hotel Designs’ Meet Up North, Manchester’s Hotel Gotham, which opened in 2015 – read full review here, has been a major catalyst that has crowned the northern metropolis a major hot spot for hotel design and development. The jewel within the crown is located on the rooftop, at Club Brass.

Leading designers, architects, hoteliers and key-industry suppliers are expected to gather at the hotel’s exclusive members-only rooftop bar, Club Brass, for drinks and canapés above the city on July 1 for Meet Up North. Click here to purchase your exclusive ticket

Peninsula Paris – The Rooftop Bar (France)

Paris rooftop bar with curved windows overlooking a model plane

Image credit: Peninsula Hotels

Located on the sixth floor of The Peninsula Paris – and offering unparalleled views over the city – sits L’Oiseau Blanc, one of the most elegant and singular restaurants in Paris. The aviation-themed interior celebrates flying aces Charles Nungesser and François Coli who attempted to cross the Atlantic in 1927 from Le Bourget.

The Moxy, Chelsea (USA)

Dark-lit, open-planned room with lavish bar

Image caption/credit: The Fleur Room | Moxy Hotels/ Marriott International

Located on the 35th floor, the intimate rooftop bar, The Fleur Room, is open to hotel guests and locals alike. The alluring glow of light and color birth a heightened space of intimacy and mystery. The sofa material is embedded with a floral design and the bronzed furniture surfaces are smooth and polished. “Sink back into the comfortable couches and let your eyes settle on an incredible view of one of New York’s most recognizable charms – the Empire State building,” suggests journalist Hannah Kaplan who checked in to review the the kid on the block for Hotel Designs last week. Read the full review of the hotel here.

Soho House Istanbul – Club Bar (Turkey)

Refined interiors in a modern bar that is sheltered in a heritage building with bold lighting

Image credit: Soho House Istanbul, Club Bar

Sheltered within a striking 19th century mansion, which was originally designed for a Genoese merchant before becoming the US embassy for most of the 20th century. The Club Bar  is an oasis of calm, featuring decadent wallcoverings that are balanced with plush bar seating and thoughfully designed break-out areas.

Zuri Zanzibar – The Upendo Restaurant (Tanzania)

Sustainable materials - including furniture and lighting - make up the raw and rustic restaurant

Image credit: Zuri Zanzibar

Designed by Jestico + Whiles, the eco hotel’s Upendo Restaurant overlooks the entire resort. The restaurant’s laid-back Zanzibari style and live cooking shows make it the ideal place for breakfast and dinner, whilst its separate deck is ideal for private events or larger dinner groups. Peponi bar in the Zuri Zanzibar offers comfortable benches and sofas for a peaceful and relaxing ambiance.

Raffles – The Long Bar (Singapore)

Exterior of the hotel

Image credit: Raffles

Redesigned by Alexandra Champalimaud, the earthy decor of the two-storey Long Bar which will reopen this summer is inspired by Malayan life in the 1920s. The deep, rich colours and lush greenery transport patrons to the edge of a tropical plantation. In keeping with the relaxed atmosphere, guests are invited to brush peanut shells off the table and bar counter to the floor. In addition, and arguably thus making the hotel one of the early innovators for encouraging bar theatre, The Long Bar is quite possibly the only place in Singapore where littering is encouraged.

The Morpheus (China)

The sky bar, with sophisticated gold barriers between tables

Image credit: Melco Resorts & Entertainment

Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, Yí on the 21st-floor Sky Bridge at The Morpheus takes fine dining to new heights with a unique blend of regional Chinese cuisine served in tasting menu format. Yí is the first Chinese restaurant in Macau offering daily multi-course tasting menus.

Main image credit: Moxy Chelsea, New York

New Skopos decorative velvet upholstery with a carnival feel

800 534 Hamish Kilburn

Celebrating the New Year in style, the new luxury flame retardant decorative upholstery velvet collection from Skopos, La Feria, officially launches this month…

Appropriately named La Feria, after the annual local festival in Spain and southern France which is characterised by bullfights, bull running in the streets, bodegas, Skopos’ new collection brings a dramatic carnival feel to contract upholstery. A collection of unique FR velvet designs, La Feria incorporates five elegant new designs, involving different combinations of expressive colour and elegant soft neutrals.

La Feria achieves the high standards required for cruise, hospitality and leisure contract interiors.

Sofa with the La Feria fabrics

Image credit: Skopos

Designs include Cadiz, an organic feather/herringbone design with an exquisite metallic outline and Cordoba, a soft textured pebble design; a multi-coloured chevron; a diamond; and an exotic tile. The collection comes with Crib5 backing as standard and a soft, luxurious pile.  La Feria achieves 40,000+ Martindale rubs, meeting the needs for severe contract fabrics.

Samples of the collection are available now. View the La Feria designs on the Skopos website.

Skopos is one of our recommended suppliers. To keep up to date with their news, click here. And, if you are interested in becoming one of our recommended suppliers, click here.

bar at the entrance of Doc Cheng's restaurant, Raffles Hotel, Singapore

SPOTLIGHT ON: Bars, Restaurants & Catering

1024 686 Katy Phillips

Throughout May Hotel Designs will focus on two essential components to a hotel’s make up – bars & restaurants and catering equipment…

If you want to get your company and products in front of an audience of interior designers, procurement specialists and hoteliers for a month of specially focussed commentary, this is a fantastic opportunity.

HOTELS NEED TO MAKE THEIR SOCIAL SPACES ‘DESTINATIONS’

With so many bars and restaurants in existence these days, how does a hotel bar or restaurant keep its guests from straying elsewhere as well as attracting non-residents through its doors? The answer is through its design and the atmosphere that design creates. Customers of all ages need to feel excited, stimulated and comfortable – getting the style of a hotel restaurant, bar or café right is vital, will it disrupt staff workflow? How do safety regulations come into the design process?

Ultimately a hotel bar or restaurant can be a key driver in enticing new customers, make a significant contribution to the hotels revenue and support overarching brand values. This month, we look at some of the best examples in the world right now.

OFFER A FOOD EXPERIENCE LIKE NO OTHER

Food matters – fact. By making your menus current, different and unique, you will entice your guests. Restaurant and bar aesthetics aside, you have to make an impression with what is on the plates you serve.

Current trends see locally sourced produce a key component whilst the look of the food it just as fundamental – sharing food pictures socially is huge and for an hotelier, an opportunity to maximise on free advertising. In order to get food to the table, hoteliers have to have the very best equipment and tools for their staff. We will be focussing on the behind-the-scenes of hospitality equipment – one of the biggest sectors in the industry – from the best equipment to regulations, and best practice.

There are plenty of ways you can get involved with these features, from supplying an opinion piece to working with us on a targeted mini-series.

If you wish to find out more, please contact Jennie Lane on 01992 374098 or j.lane@forumevents.co.uk

 

Image supplied by William Cho

Project Spotlight: B3 Designers at Hotel de la Paix, Geneva

996 608 Daniel Fountain

When London-based B3 Designers was appointed to transform Hotel de la Paix Geneva’s new Fiskebar restaurants and bar, contemporary Nordic minimalism was the starting point for the design’s inspiration.

This theme reflects the restaurants’ cuisine concept – the first of its kind in the Swiss capital’s prestigious neighbourhood. The harmonious connection with nature, the neutral deeper and darker tones and detailing, abundance of raw materials and weathered textures against minimalistic furniture, whilst retaining elements of timeless rich luxury, has embodied the design ethos of this 220m² space.

Hotel de la Paix, Geneva
There are four distinct yet interconnecting areas at play – the chic and intimate fine-dining restaurant, the more casual raw kitchen counter with its high-table communal seating, the luxurious bar and its cosy opulent lounge. The Nordic theme throughout these spaces evolves from sophisticated modern elegance, to playfully fashion-forward.

RESTAURANT SPACES
A refined atmosphere is created in Fiskebar’s fine-dining restaurant, featuring a spacious and comfortable layout of smooth oak and dark, raw tones. Guests are invited to relax into plush banquettes and cosy armchairs in neutral and warm leather, and dine on slate-topped tables with brass detail. The walls are lined with raw yet smooth, grey-toned timber panelling – a remarkable back-drop for British artist Adam Ross’ grand installation of hand-made abstract ceramic oyster forms of varying shapes and sizes, which was specially commissioned for this project.

The exquisitely understated Dinesen oak flooring seamlessly connects this room to the raw kitchen counter and bar, along with the large distressed beams installed overhead. This casual minimalistic yet elegant dining area, with its open kitchen and raw food counter display, features two long communal tables with stick-back style high chairs, as well as smaller tables for couples. Futuristic long tubular pendant lights hover above the communal tables creating a more casual fish market style atmosphere. The green glazed brick wall tiles in the exposed kitchen contrasts against the dominating dark finishes of the rest of the space. The timber wall panelling is carried through to this space, but with the addition of antique seeded mirrors. Handblown glass pendant lighting is hung in clusters by the windows with views to the terrace.

Hotel de la Paix, Geneva - B3 DesignersCOCKTAIL BAR AND LOUNGE
B3 Designers were fortunate to have some pre-existing heritage-listed features to work with in the cocktail bar and lounge, which include antique wall panelling as well as classic French mouldings and 150-year old parquet and walnut floor. This room was rumoured to have once been used for the drafting of the Geneva Convention, and the antique gilded dove-shaped door handles make a poignant reference to Switzerland’s legacy of peace. The cocktail bar and lounge has a rich palette of textures, colours and timelessly classic vintage furniture. The curved bar, supported by a mixologist’s dream liquor display, sits in one corner of the room, framed by high bar stools.

Low-level tables and plush seating are scattered throughout the rest of the space. The heritage features are complemented with an opulent Venetian-style distressed fresco and plaster effect on the walls, which are also adorned with an eclectic cluster of curated and bespoke Geneva-themed artwork, posters and photographs with historical significance. The bijou lounge is an intimately private and exclusive space with a rich velvet banquette and subtle lighting.

Hotel de la Paix, Geneva - B3 DesignersB3 DESIGNERS
The lead designer on Ritz-Carlton Geneva’s Fiskebar project is Roisin Reilly, who graduated from the Glasgow School of Art with a first-class Honours degree in Design and Interior Design. She joined B3 Designers in 2014.

B3 Designers was founded in 2002 by Mark Bithrey. He has worked in developing branded architectural interiors in leisure-dominated agencies for more than fifteen years. B3 Designers has, under Mark’s creative direction, developed an impressive, diverse and award-winning portfolio. Prior to founding B3 Mark worked for Din Associates, Revolution and Portland Design where he gained a great deal of experience in the retail sector, having completed projects for Selfridges, Virgin, Guinness and Ferrari. In addition to his work at B3 Mark held the post for Marketing Director at the British Institute of Interior Design (BIID), is an affiliate member of RIBA and a member of the Chartered Society of Designers.

Creative collaboration and a down to earth, ‘hands on’ approach are key to B3′s services. The team consists of a group of diverse individuals who reflect this range of skills; each of B3’s associates have backgrounds in interior, graphic and product design as well as architecture, brand writing and strategy.

www.b3designers.co.uk