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Presidential Suite Bedroom

ONE UN New York completes $70 million refurbishment

998 595 Daniel Fountain

Millennium Hotels and Resorts has announced the completion of a $70 million (£58 million) renovation to its North American flagship hotel, ONE UN New York, an iconic hotel situated at the heart of the International United Nations Headquarter enclave.

In keeping with the distinctive architecture and design of the original Kevin Roche-designed building, the multi-million-dollar renovation has been thoughtfully carried out, bringing back to life the original elegance and stature of the hotel that has welcomed world leaders, diplomats and heads of state since its opening in 1976. The renovation encompassed all 439 guestrooms and suites, meetings and event spaces, public areas and the Ambassador Grill Restaurant and Bar.

Throughout the project, Millennium Hotels and Resorts collaborated with architect and interior design consultants, Didier Gomez Interiors and DYAMI Architecture PC in order to realise the vision of the hotel. The transformation has resulted in significant front-of-house improvements along with upgraded facilities and equipment, enhancing the overall guest experience.

One UN redesign
The spacious interiors of the redesigned guest rooms and suites at ONE UN New York are characterised by warm bronze and taupe hues, creating a stylish sanctuary where guests can relax away from the buzz of the city below. Ranging from 240 square-feet to a generous 510 square-feet (22 square-metres to 47 square-metres), each of the rooms and suites combine understated luxury with modern amenities.

One UN New York redesign

Paul Rene Lee, General Manager of ONE UN New York, commented: “We are delighted with the outcome of the recent renovation to ONE UN New York. The complete transformation is a testament to our concerted effort to ensure that our guest experience remains unparalleled, without having compromised the rich history and heritage of the hotel.”

One UN New York redesign

Colin Wang, Vice President of Operations, North America continued: “The renovation of ONE UN New York demonstrates our commitment to continued investment in our portfolio of hotels in North America. The renovations completed to date support our goal to maintain our high reputation among discerning travellers, and to become the hotel of choice in the markets we have a presence in.”

Complementing the new guest experience, all 281 associates at ONE UN New York underwent an extensive training programme throughout the renovation, focused on maintaining and exceeding the high standard of service that goes hand in hand with outstanding hospitality. Newly-designed staff uniforms together with new guest room linens and amenities complete the experience.

Situated opposite one of the world’s greatest landmarks, the International United Nations Headquarter, ONE UN New York boasts panoramic views across the Manhattan skyline to one side, with sweeping views of the East River to the other. Ideally located in the dynamic Mid-Town Manhattan borough of New York City, the Broadway Theatre district, Times Square, Empire State Building, Grand Central Terminal and Fifth Avenue are all just a stone’s throw from the hotel.

For more information, click here. . .

Belmond Mount Nelson

The Belmond Mount Nelson reveals its guestroom redesign

900 600 Daniel Fountain

Inge Moore and her London-based design team have completed the refurbishment of 48 guestrooms and suites in one of the world’s most iconic hotels – Cape Town’s Belmond Mount Nelson. The design intent was to recreate the original spirt of the grand old hotel, which opened in 1899 and was said at the time to be as elegant as any fine London hotel, while updating it in such a way to engage today’s connoisseur travellers and lovers of exceptional hotels.

Inspired by Heritage
Capetonian heritage and influences were therefore the foundation to the designers’ thinking and this was a narrative that proved to open up layers of design opportunity. Once, seafarers from around the globe discovered the Cape and made it home, embracing what she had to offer and combining this with what they had brought from their previous lives. Local materials, rustic timbers, beads and clay brought together with sparkling crystal, silver cutlery and fine bone china created a new vernacular that uniquely belonged in the Cape. It was this mixing of the old and the new, the refined and the artisanal that Inge has translated into the refurbished guestrooms. Importantly, just as the “Nellie” has always been, the redesigned rooms are comfortably residential in feel. For the many loyal guests who return year-after-year, the ambience of their room will be reassuringly familiar while there will be much to discover that is new and enchanting.

The Belmond Mount Nelson reveals its guestroom redesign

“The Mount Nelson is one of a small handful of hotels that epitomise the inheritance and soul of their location, so they must be subtly moved on within the continuum of their beloved personality,” says Inge.

Connected with Nature
The gardens, lovingly tended and matured over the decades since the hotel first opened, as well as the breath-taking view of Table Mountain mean that Mount Nelson Hotel is the place to contemplate both the majesty of untamed nature and the beauty of man’s work with nature. The redesign celebrates both. Windows and casings have been restored and painted white, while the new drapery pelmets are smaller than before, effectively opening up the windows and framing the views. Guests can now better connect with what is outside and take the emotion with them as they relax inside. The bed is the centrepiece of each room, focused on the view and, at the foot of each bed, there is a local ‘riempies bank’ – the bench introduced to the Cape by the early settlers and locally made. Each room has a “chair to dream in”, a deeply comfortable armchair placed at a vantage point to soak up the panorama and allow the guest a place to slow down and feel what is important to them, be it to think, read or just to be.

Other heirloom furniture includes dark timber tables and cabinets with brass and leather detailing, while some furniture has been specially designed as a modern take on traditional pieces. There are idiosyncratic pieces, such as a beaded mirror, introduced to balance the collection and ensure the rooms retain an air of light hearted residential randomness. In re-planning the rooms, wardrobe space has become as generous as each room allows to meet the needs of the many guests who stay for a week or more.

The Belmond Mount Nelson reveals its guestroom redesign

All materials are classic, timeless and locally sourced. Originally, the hotel had timber flooring. Now, new oak flooring has been introduced into some suites, scattered with rugs crafted by local carpet weavers. Natural leather and linen abounds and antiqued and bevelled mirror reflects the sparkle of crystal and the sunshine dancing through the room. Drapery is soft and calming in tone, locally embroidered with a flower motif to bring a biophilic context – a love of life and things natural and hand-made – to the design. The guestrooms are light and airy on sunny days but they will also be cosy and cocooning when the sea mists and rain roll in. “They are rooms for slow living, a place to nest and connect with one’s emotions,” says Stan Chan, a senior member of the design team.

Telling the Story through Art
Artwork is a major part of the experience and the rooms have been lovingly accessorised with collections of objects and over-scaled paintings curated by Janine Bath in collaboration with Inge. All of the art is by local artists, some is contemporary and some depicts the beautiful landscapes of this part of the world in a new way.

“I think that art in hotels is either just decorative or it has real meaning – there is nothing in-between,” says Inge. “When we have the opportunity to develop art with local artists, it creates the meaning of the project and sets the tone. For Mount Nelson, I wanted to celebrate the amazing Cape and bring this into the hotel.”

The Belmond Mount Nelson reveals its guestroom redesign

The new artworks have joined many fine existing pieces which have been re-framed in a contemporary manner, complimenting the traditionally classic images of landscapes and flowers. Guestroom corridors have been transformed with new art offering a journey through the work of some of Cape Town’s most interesting established and budding artists, combined with the existing collection. The introduction of additional chandeliers and crystal wall lights provides new sparkle as well as more light, the tones of paint replicate heritage colours favoured in domestic settings in the late 19th century and a new sisal-inspired carpet hints at the hard-wearing floor coverings of the turn of the century.

“I want guests to feel like they are walking through the corridors of a beloved aunt’s amazing home,” concludes Inge.

All photography: Micky Hoyle

belmond.com/mount-nelson-hotel-cape-town/

The Principal York - Lobby Lounge

The Principal York becomes triple award winner

1024 683 Daniel Fountain

It was confirmed last month that The Principal York (designed by Goddard Littlefair and one of the launch hotels for PRINCIPAL, a collection of landmark hotels in UK city centres) has won the Gold Award for Hospitality Interior Design at the London Design Awards 2016, to be presented at a ceremony in March of this year.

The new award is in addition to the hotel’s double success at the Visit York Tourism Awards, where it won both Conference Venue of the Year and the overall Hotel of the Year crown. The Principal York was also shortlisted twice over for the refurbishment of its public spaces at the EHDAs (European Hotel Design Awards) at the end of 2016.

The magnificent, Grade-II-listed hotel, boasting beautiful gardens and views over York Minster, was originally one of Britain’s greatest Victorian railway hotels, housed in a purpose-built building in yellow Scarborough brick by architect William Peachey and first opening its doors in 1878. After the hotel was acquired by Starwood Capital, Goddard Littlefair was commissioned to redesign its public spaces, including the lobby, reception, Garden Room, entrances and corridor spaces, as well as all 159 bedrooms and suites. The full design team on the project also included Michaelis Boyd (who redesigned the bar and restaurant at the hotel), whilst architects 3D Reid oversaw the structural works on the project.

The Principal York - Lobby Lounge

“Our overall ambition was to breathe life back into every artery of the hotel’s interior,” Goddard Littlefair Director and Co-Founder Jo Littlefair explained. “Giving a nod to tradition and heritage, but also creating a tremendously warm, light and welcoming contemporary environment for guests. We were briefed to reinstate the hotel’s essential character and to pay respect to its original architecture, whilst at the same time ensuring a feeling of comfort, restfulness, so that The Principal York was once again a true destination hotel.”

The Principal York - Lobby

Space-planning and Structure
The hotel originally had two entrances, with the first on the garden side of the hotel for guests arriving by coach or car and a rather secondary entrance on the other side for guests arriving by rail. One of the first key elements of Goddard Littlefair’s new plan was to ensure both entrances were of equal importance so that all guests had a real sense of arrival, with both routes quickly joining one of two main public space circulation axes – the Promenade or the Colonnade. The ‘business’ of arrival is now contained within a relocated reception area, located off the Promenade, so the overall public space feels less transient and suitcases can disappear quickly into this dedicated and spacious contained room.

The Principal York

Opening up views throughout was key and two brand new entrances were cut into the Garden Room, alongside three more into the relocated reception area, so that the ground floor is flooded with light and there are tempting glimpses of spaces beyond, whichever way guests traverse the building. The new public and lounge spaces are bright and generously-proportioned and offer food and beverages throughout the day, from teas and coffees to afternoon tea or an evening menu, maximising revenue possibilities from the fabulously light and welcoming space.

Interior Design Concept
The central design concept was to create a modern and softer interpretation of a country house, featuring over-scaled furniture, such as large wing chairs, to ensure an instant feeling of welcome, combined with a light and soothing colour palette, featuring a gentle and fairly neutral base with softer highlights in shades such as eau de nil and lavender. Similarly, the furniture is in colours such as tan, buff and charcoal, with small amounts of texture and pattern for added interest.

Interesting and unique art and antiques give the interiors a sense of heritage and character, whilst traditional, high-quality materials, including linen, leather, wool and linen velvet express both comfort and authenticity. A sense of place is incorporated through, for example, artworks referencing York Races or images from historic society gatherings in York, particularly involving the Duke and Duchess of York. The design team also integrated architectural drawings of Castle Howard and other local stately homes, as well as antique maps.

The Principal York - The Garden Room
The whole scheme features a series of antique objects, hand-picked by Goddard Littlefair from antique markets around the country, including old trunks, for example, and beautiful stone dogs. The furniture throughout is also bespoke. This ensures a unique environment and is part of the Goddard Littlefair design approach, looking to create as many bespoke items as possible, so that they are always designed with the exact location, function and end-user in mind – and also embody a certain location-specific exclusivity.

Interiors Walk-through
The Colonnade, which proceeds from a glass-roofed original hexagonal arrival space, now gives a real sense of arrival for guests arriving via the railway station, stretching out towards the main public spaces beyond. Ten custom-made mirrors, some full-height and some sitting above doors, line the space and give it a rhythm, whilst glass and brass pendant lanterns add yet more light and warmth via a specialist, subtly-sparkling antiqued finish. The mirrors feature antiqued glass set within carved, frames with a moon gold finish and are a great way of indulging visitors’ desires for subtle people-watching, as well as increasing a sense of space. Because of their immense proportions, the glass had to be manufactured in separate pieces and then assembled on site. Curtains hang alongside the mirrors in a soft brown colour with a darker trim near the bottom.

The Colonnade has also been made warmer through the addition of bespoke, comfortable, high-backed wing chairs in mink brown leather along with tables with lamps. Cushions are in a green silk velvet with an oyster silk band, echoing the band on the curtains. The carpet is a bespoke design for the project, by Goddard Littlefair in conjunction with Hotel Design partners Brintons – as with the carpets throughout the project. A discreet concierge station awaits guests at the top of the Colonnade, so that guests arriving this way can be accompanied to the reception room.

The Principal York
The Promenade, which meets the Colonnade at a T-junction at its top end, runs the full width of the ground floor area and is punctured along its length by entrances. At its centre, it becomes a seamless part of the Lobby Lounge. The design treatment for the Promenade features the same pendant lights as the Colonnade, artworks that are top-lit by a brass light fitting and a grey carpet from Brintons with a darker border.

The new reception is located next to the garden entrance and is a spacious and light and dressed with furniture that has a pronounced residential flavour, including two large desks designed to ressemble giant trunks; two tall bookcases behind the reception and a central display of framed vintage keys, as well as large and small-scale artwork (selected with art consultants Visto) and a separate seating area, with wingback chairs arranged around a newly-installed fireplace. Lighting is in the form of two French chandeliers suspended on heavy-duty dark metal chains, with desk lamps on the reception and in the seating area.

The Principal York
The heart of the new scheme is made up of two wonderful, large and light-filled open spaces, punctuated by handsome original columns with ornate capitals, all of which have been refurbished. These are the Lobby Lounge, which contains the hotel’s wonderful, dramatic staircase and the Garden Room beyond, which looks out, as its name suggests, onto the hotel’s extensive gardens. There are clear views through from one to the other, to ensure they interact, via the existing central and the two new entrances. Both spaces – as well as the reception room – feature oiled oak flooring from Havwoods with a special ‘sawn’ surface and laid in a herringbone pattern. The timber was deliberately chosen for its informal, not overly-polished look. Inset rugs are by Brintons.

Beautiful, bespoke chandeliers, made up of faceted, cut crystal baguettes set within in bronze frames, which Goddard Littlefair developed together with Heathfield, punctuate the two spaces. There are three chandeliers in the Garden Room and three more in the Lobby Lounge, one of which, which hangs down through the stairwell, is triple-tiered.

At the left-hand side of the Lobby Lounge is the staircase, which has been refurbished and re-carpeted with a bordered goose eye patterned carpet. New wall mouldings and panels have been added as guests go up the stair, acting as a background to the stair’s dramatic new decorative feature – a five-storey-high eclectic collection of mirrors with picture lights above, all in different shapes, sizes and frames, which allow views down, through and across the hotel and which also maximise light and reflectiveness.

The Principal York
For the furniture within the Lobby Lounge and Garden Rooms, every aspect was carefully considered, so that the heights of the seats correspond perfectly with the table heights, for example, ensuring guests can eat and drink in the public and lounge spaces with ease. The Garden Room is a particular highlight of the final design and is a beautiful, long, light and elegant space, complete with Chesterfield sofas, wing chairs and marble-topped tables, making it the perfect location to relax and enjoy afternoon tea – and more. The sofas here are upholstered in an Evitavonni fabric with bespoke, highly-detailed cushions featuring trimmings by Samuel & Sons and fabrics including Primavera by Rubelli and Plaza by Casamance. Tall plan chests around the edges of the room conceal waiter stations, as well as refrigerated drawers and storage space for point-of-sale materials.

Set dressing here includes an array of antique objects, hand-picked by Goddard Littlefair from antique markets around the country for this project, such as antique books, old trunks and beautiful stone dogs. These suggest heritage and reflect the hotel’s long-standing and established reputation and also ensure that the environment is unique and not filled with things guests might see in other places. The hotel’s own archives were thoroughly investigated too in the search for treasure from the past, revealing such gems as a collection of old thank-you letters from the 1930s through to the 1950s, which have been used for display in the corridor approaching the restaurant.

The Principal York
Upstairs, the suites boast great proportions, plenty of natural light and have a natural, high-ceilinged elegance. Each one is comprised of a sitting area with sofa, bedroom and bathroom. The design accent here was on relaxation, answering a brief to be residential in feel and scale, so that guests feel at ease the moment their suitcases are out of their hands. A dado rail and wooden panelling add layers of interest, with added warmth from the wood. Fabric headboards add softness with an unusual concertina design adding interest and creating a sense of movement. Picture lights and room art create added visual interest via country-inspired imagery of wild flowers, horses, dogs and period cartography.

For the suites and bedrooms, all bed divans and mattresses are by Moonraker, whilst the throws, in a beautiful soft wool, were bespoke-designed for the project and supplied by Bute Fabrics. The sofas are bespoke, as is all the furniture throughout. The wood panelling in the rooms is carried on through to the bathrooms, which feature a roll-top standalone bath, marble flooring and bespoke washstand and mirror in pre-aged timber.

Jo Littlefair concluded on the overall scheme: “This project has been a great experience for us. It has been incredibly rewarding and we feel privileged to have been involved. We love restoration projects and challenges – particularly, as here, when we can address the whole space, be creative and successfully breathe new life into a property.”

Photos: Gareth Gardner, PRINCIPAL and Daniel Fountain
Hotel Designs also visited The Principal York in September 2016

phcompany.com/principal/york-hotel

Exterior - Pulitzer Amsterdam

Sneak Peek: Pulitzer Amsterdam completes head-to-toe restoration

1000 526 Daniel Fountain

The final touches of Pulitzer Amsterdam’s extensive restoration have been put into place, and the iconic 45-year old hotel celebrated its grand opening recently with the completion of a quintessentially Dutch redesign across its labyrinth of 25 Golden Age canal houses.

The re-opening of Pulitzer Amsterdam’s Prinsengracht canal side of the hotel sees the unveiling of areas including the main entrance and lobby, the inner gardens, a two-storey gym, as well as a further 145 guestrooms and suites.

An impressive new entrance, the first new building since the canals received UNESCO status, now welcomes guests in style, guiding them into the eccentric yet luxurious lobby, furnished with vintage Persian rugs, antique furniture and a collection of historic and contemporary artwork.

The jewel in the crown is the inner gardens – occupying an unexpectedly large and serene hideaway nestled at the centre of the hotel. Creative Director, Jacu Strauss, has created a casual park-like feel within the space, a flexible area for guests and visitors to relax, work or socialise amongst seasonal plants and playful sculptures. Spanning areas of the lobby and the garden is Pause at Pulitzer, the hotel’s inviting café which serves drinks and light dishes throughout the day.

A total of 225 guestrooms and suites balance Amsterdam’s rich past and contemporary present in an eclectic mix of finishes, designs and elements which complement each room’s individual charm. Each room provides free wifi, a vintage telephone, Le Labo amenities, a custom-made minibar with cocktail mixing facilities and a bike repair set to complete the experience of the Dutch capital.

Four exceptional Collector’s Suites are inspired by the narrative of elaborate characters who may have lived in the buildings throughout the years; from a compulsive art devotee to an eccentric book lover; a music composer and a grand antique collector.

Quirky features include a dramatic floor-to-ceiling archway of books, a wall of trumpets, and a large painting depicting a modern scenario of The Last Supper. Each has a private entrance and stunning views of the canals. Meanwhile, the beautifully romantic Pulitzer’s Suite, with its freestanding grand bath tub, super king size bed and views over the gardens, is ideal for those staying with a loved one.

Formerly a senior designer at Tom Dixon’s Design Research Studio, Strauss has worked with a highly skilled team to painstakingly deconstruct the heritage of the canal houses and bring new light to their best kept secrets. From trade merchants to flamboyant Dutch aristocrats, past inhabitants of the canal houses have inspired the rich character of the hotel to invite guests to explore and discover. Eclectic yet elegant, the understated new look blends original and historic features with luxurious modern-day elements.

Pulitzer Amsterdam’s restaurant, Jansz., demonstrates the hotel’s deep passion for elegant culinary craftsmanship. Executive chef Cassidy Hallman has used an old-fashioned, quality-loving approach to create a menu of beautifully crafted modern classics that respect the simplicity of quality produce and ingredients. Next door, Pulitzer’s Bar is a classic and chic hotel bar with sumptuous furnishings and a rich and intimate atmosphere. The cocktail menu offers drinks that are classic in element and style, but modern in execution.

Alexander van Gastel, General Manager of Pulitzer Amsterdam, commented: “We are overwhelmed by the positive feedback we have received so far from guests and locals on the new-look Pulitzer Amsterdam. Our Grand Opening marks the next chapter and a very special moment in the hotel’s history. We are excited to reveal our complete offering and once again fully re-open for business. I am so proud of the dedication from all involved to bring this together, delivering our vision above and beyond.”

Pulitzer Amsterdam is located in one of the chicest neighbourhoods of the Dutch capital’s city centre, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Within easy reach is the Rijksmuseum, Stedelijk Museum, the Van Gogh Museum and The Anne Frank House. The fashionable Nine Streets, the quaint shops of Jordaan, the flower market and the Royal Palace are also a short distance away.

pulitzeramsterdam.com

Utopia Spa at Rowhill Grange Hotel

Utopia Spa at Rowhill Grange Hotel gets £250k facelift

1002 470 Daniel Fountain

The Utopia Spa at Rowhill Grange Hotel has undergone a £250,000 investment programme which has given the space a new fresh-faced look.

The popular spa at the 38-bed hotel is benefiting from two new treatment rooms, including a double room, a new hair spa and nail spa with luxury manicure and pedicure stations.

A new relaxation lounge has been designed for privacy with 12 loungers and four pod chairs hidden behind a central curtain, plus Tweed Mill blankets for extra comfort. The changing rooms and treatment waiting area have both been given a facelift and the Utopia Spa has boasts the addition of a new retail shopping area.

Utopia Spa at Rowhill Grange Hotel

Originally built in 1868 as the summer house for 18-year-old Alice Alexander, Rowhill Grange became the first property in the Alexander Hotels Group in 1994.

The hotel’s 38 bedrooms are surrounded by 15 acres of grounds and gardens and the hotel itself is also home to a 2 AA Rosette fine dining restaurant.

James Perry, general manager, commented: “After a 10 week refurbishment to our Utopia Spa, we are truly delighted with the finish and feel we have achieved. The addition of our new facilities will further enhance our guest’s luxury spa experience and offer a truly unique spa experience within the Kent County.”

RPW Design - Fairmont St. Andrews Restaurant

RPW Design unveils latest 2016 project: Fairmont St Andrews

1000 570 Daniel Fountain

RPW Design has announced the extensive refurbishment of the five-star resort, Fairmont St Andrews, which has been designed over the last year. The highly anticipated refurbishment will feature a complete redesign of the Atrium, incorporating a bespoke 60m long ceiling sculpture by award winning artist George Singer, a new restaurant and a refurb of the Kittock’s Bar.

RPW Design will also extend their signature touch to the hotel’s suites and bedrooms, showcasing the deep rooted connection between the history of St Andrews and the exterior landscape, seamlessly relating the interiors to the surroundings. This sophisticated transformation will see all public areas completed by July 2016, while bedrooms and suites will be completed by May 2017.

Reception Lobby
A pair of contemporary velvet wall hangings, inspired by the varying landscape of St Andrews in a painterly manner have been developed and printed by Timorous Beasties, the avant-garde Scottish artistic fabric and textile designers. These have been installed in the double heighted reception space to give a sense of locality and authenticity as soon as guests enter the hotel.

RPW Design - Fairmont St. Andrews Reception

Upholstery fabrics and leathers have been selected from revered Scottish companies such as Andrew Muirhead and Bute Fabrics. Bute, based on the Isle of Bute off west coast of Scotland are providing a number of richly textured fabrics in the scheme influenced by the islands scenery. The company and the island share a unique family history as the 5th Marquess of Bute set up the company in 1947 to provide employment for returning servicemen and servicewomen. The Bute family has been inextricably linked with the island and its development ever since.

The Atrium
George Singer’s outstanding artwork ‘Zephyr’ is an organic, swirling ceiling sculpture sweeping through the atrium, imitating the movement of the water in the North Sea. The sculpture will create a focal point to the room and encourage an intimate atmosphere in this dramatic space.

According to George Singer: “Zephyr is designed to reflect the crashing waves, the flocks of starlings, the long wind-blown grasses, the spring blossom, the shoals of fish, the rolling hills, the clouds and the sheer energy, beauty, and dynamism of the east coast of Scotland.”

RPW Design - Fairmont St. Andrews Atrium

A natural colour palette, layered earthy textures and an eclectic furniture collection will create a relaxed, inviting atmosphere in the lounge as well as linking the interior with the views of the coastal landscape beyond the full height window at the north end of the Atrium.

Following through into the restaurant, dramatic lighting and refined materials with a colour scheme of pine and sage greens and hints of golds create a sense of quality throughout the space. Soft velvet wall drapes and bespoke screens reflecting the ripples in the sand dunes soften the architecture of the space and give a sense of intimacy.

The Bar
“RPW Design has drawn on a rich colour scheme with nautical elements that create a warm atmosphere for drinking and dining. A revised layout opens up the space to the lobby and a new copper coffee counter links the reception to the bar area”, explains Heather McLellan, Senior Designer for the project.

A carpet design based on the markings found in the nearby River Tay estuaries, along with the use of materials such as timber, copper and rope strengthen the connection between the interior design and history of St Andrews and its surrounding old fishing villages.

RPW Design - Fairmont St. Andrews Bar

The theme of Scottish suppliers follows through to the bar area where bespoke pendants from Edinburgh lighting manufacturers, RS Robertson create a feature to the space. Elizabeth Lane, Director of Projects RPW Design, said: “It is a wonderful opportunity to be part of the revival of this hotel property which simply has a breath-taking location which we have made a focal point in the renovation. We are extremely happy to be working with Kennedy Wilson and Fairmont Hotels & Resorts on this project.”