• Covid-19 – click here for the latest updates from Forum Events & Media Group Ltd

Posts Tagged :

Materials

TREND ALERT: Natural stone in hotel design lighting

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
TREND ALERT: Natural stone in hotel design lighting

With designers and architects looking for new innovative ways in which to inject biophilic design, Voltra Lighting takes a look at beneficial properties of natural stone…

Cappadocia, an ancient district in Turkey, never fails to capture the imagination of discerning travellers with its high-end rock-cut hotels that exude pure elegance and character. Everything from the hotel fireplace to floating shelves and even the bathroom fittings tend to transport visitors into the lap of luxury, by virtue of being carved out of timeless and all-natural stone.

Be it luxe beach stays in Greece or heritage hotels in India, there are many such examples where floor-to-ceiling natural stone designs add a distinctly tasteful texture to the interiors. So much so that avant-garde designers are increasingly considering richly patterned accent walls of stone to be works of art in itself; doing away with the need for additional wall hangings and paintings.

Oftentimes, even a few accent pieces fashioned from natural stone can transform ordinary spaces into extraordinary interior marvels. One such decor essential is the precision-cut alabaster lamp by luxury cordless lighting brand Voltra. This vessel of light is designed to create an ambience of heightened intimacy and sophistication.

The allure of natural stone explained

Hotels can choose to adorn their interiors with the likes of stylish Italian marble, delicately polished granite, or beautifully layered slate – each of which has an inherently unique appeal.

But, here are the features that make natural stone decor elements universally captivating:

Sustainable: Luxury hotel properties that have an environmentally conscious bent will find ethically sourced natural stone decor pieces to be great for the triple-bottom-line – being extremely recyclable and fabricated in a zero-waste industry.

Classic and timeless: At a time when trends and forecasts dominate, handmade stone decor pieces will always be an elegant choice. Especially when it’s just the right balance between design and craft, stone is perfectly suited for both traditional and contemporary decor themes.

Easy to maintain: Being able to resist rot, mold, extreme temperatures and water damage, makes natural stone particularly great for high-end bathrooms, outdoor spaces and kitchens.

Incredibly durable: Trust mother nature to produce some of the most resilient and exquisite building materials there is. Classy natural stones materials such as granite and quartz are known for their durability and longevity.

Unique: Just like a snowflake, the intricate designs and colors of no two stones occurring in nature can ever be exactly alike. You may choose from variants that have delicate golden sparkles, different colors, subtle textures and complex veins. This natural diversity of form makes it possible for you to design your hotel interiors to be exclusive and distinctive.

Keeping it trendy with natural stone

The versatility of natural stone has ensured that it remains a symbol of luxury and refinement for decades now. To help your hotel interiors to stand out from the crowd, here are the latest stone-based trends for 2020:

Source local: Hotels in Brazil can use local quartz, those in Italy can choose Calacatta marble, while Lundhs Larvikite can be the stone of choice for Norwegian properties. These indigenous stone varieties, if used with vernacular architecture as inspiration, will not only tick the sustainability box but really add to the cultural richness of your space.

Super-size the tiles: The latest trend is to have large tiles, on flooring, walls or even centre tables; at sizes starting from 60x60cms. This is ideal for creating that modern, sleek look.

Experiment with stone statement pieces: Eye-catching yet understated designs of table lamps, showerheads and planters, made of natural stone, can establish tasteful imagery. Even one exquisite stone art installation can help create a one-of-a-kind look for your interiors.

Luxuriously distressed: Gone are the days when the stone had to be polished to be ready. Nowadays, a well-worn rustic look is in vogue. These distressed materials, with stunningly life-like details, are a classic choice to really suit your garden and outdoor design.

Aim for earthy vibes: Natural stone intimately connects your interiors with nature and the earth to generate versatile and old-fashioned opulence. Unify your decor by pairing your stone decor feature with plants, soil, wood, water and fire.

Voltra Lighting is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here.

Main image credit: Voltra Lighting

PRODUCT WATCH: Beneath the surface of Kerakoll Design House

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
PRODUCT WATCH: Beneath the surface of Kerakoll Design House

Casa Ceramica explains some of the beneficial properties of Kerakoll Design House

Kerakoll Design House is an integrated project for the Interior Design featuring innovative materials – cement, resin, handcrafted wood, micro-coatings, paints and glazes – coordinated in the10 colours of the inviting and neutral Piero Lissoni Warm Collection.

A new style of interior design, where materials, textures and colours blend together. Floors and coatings, walls, fixtures, furnishing accessories, lighting and heating fixtures all become a single seamless surface. Each material is hand made by skilled decorators, and any distinctive marks and irregularities in the surface are proof of its refined and exclusive nature.

Patina 

A breathable natural “old look” plaster effect finish. Applied seamlessly by skilled applications the product is unique and available in the 10 Warm Collection colours. Patina is indicated for internal surfaces (walls); for all environments in the house, with the exception of shower cubicles and around kitchen units, and for all commercial areas.

Patina gives environments an “old-look” style with great personality. Creating a sense of unfinished and imperfect, that clothes the walls with charm. It simulates the effect of passing time that, by building up a characteristic patina, attenuates the original colours, adding unexpected shading or allowing underlying layers to shine through. The texture of Patina, which is soft to the touch and extremely beautiful, features ripples, marbling and vibrations.

Microresina 

An eco-friendly decorative and protective microfilm, perfect for redesigning of existing ceramic walls & floors quickly and easily. Available in an extra matt finish and silk-touch effect. Microresina is suitable for internal surfaces either in the home or in commercial areas.

Microresina is comprised of a polyurethane elastic microfilm used to redesign existing wall surfaces. Following application the results provide a seamless colour of which, enhances patterns textures and irregularities to give rooms a fresh & contemporary look. The product redesigns and protects existing floorings and joints, transforming into a continuous surface that is completely non-absorbent, hygienic and safe.

Wallcrete 

A continuous, two-layer coating, 3 mm thick, with a trowled cement texture. Hand made by skilled decorators, and any distinctive marks or irregularities in the surface are proof of its refined and exclusive nature. Wallcrete is indicated for internal surfaces (coatings on columns, shelves, worktops and other architectural elements); for all rooms in the house and for all commercial areas, including coating of shower interiors (with the insertion of Wallcrete Aquastop waterproofing). Wallcrete is a surface with a great aesthetic impact that enhances the physical texture of the cement.

Casa Ceramica is one of the brands that has taken advantage of our Industry Support Package. To keep up to date with supplier news, click here. And, if you are interested in also benefitting from this  three-month editorial package, please email Katy Phillips by clicking here.

Main image credit: Kerakoll Design House

Editor Checks In: Is it time to reinvent the hotel design experience?

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Editor Checks In: Is it time to reinvent the hotel design experience?

Steering away from the days of absurd tech-flooded hotels, editor Hamish Kilburn has identified a number of factors in the industry that are acting as catalysts to pave a more meaningful hotel design landscape…

The hotel design industry is a shrinking violet, said nobody… ever. And you can always count on the leading individuals to shake things up with a sprinkle of unconventional concepts.

In order to keep the tide of ideas flowing, though, designers, architects and suppliers need inspiration. Cue the arrival of CES 2020 in the wild and raucous city of Las Vegas, well and truly unlike anywhere else in the universe – AKA the perfect platform for the latest innovations in technology to take flight. The CES Convention, which took place on January 7 – 10, was a playground of breakthrough technologies and next-generation innovations. From Alexa-enabled showers to rotating TVs, the show was an insight into the possibilities of hotel design, if you knew where to look.

But what it perhaps lacked, which is often the case when futuregazing, was context on how these products will benefit the guests’ overall experience (I’m not sure we need a robot to check us in or fetch us a new toilet roll).

Learning the lessons from the days when the hotel industry layered hotels with unnecessary and complex technology, designers are now looking for ways in which to make the hotel experience smarter – think seamless cyber security preventions, products that aid better sleep and atmospheric lighting.

“My aim with the February features is to explore how the industry is reinventing itself through the use of materials.”

And that leads me seamlessly to introduce next month’s features: Architecture & Construction and Surfaces. My aim with the February features is to explore how the industry is reinventing itself through the use of materials. At last year’s London Design Fair, eagle-eyed visitors would have noticed a collage of biophilic materials being introduced and explored as palpable alternative in design. Hemp, tobacco, potato waste and palm leaves were among them.

I will be presenting ‘Biophilic Materials in Surface Design’ at the Surface Design Show next month. Joined on the Main Stage by Jeremy Gove from Sibley Grove, Richard Harvey from Holland Harvey Architects and Fraser Lockley from Parkside Tiles, together we will lift the lid on new, emerging and alternative surface materials with the aim to inspire the industry to think more consciously when designing the foundations of tomorrow’s hotels and cities.

Stay tuned…

Editor, Hotel Designs

In Conversation With: Andrew Sadler from CTD Architectural Tiles

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
In Conversation With: Andrew Sadler from CTD Architectural Tiles

Editor Hamish Kilburns sits down with the Andrew Sadler, CTD Architectural Tiles specifications sector manager, to discuss how the industrial trend in surfaces is evolving, sustainable wall covering solutions and how tech is driving a new age in tile design… 

2019 is proving to be a pivotal year for surfaces. While trends are being replaced for a burning need for designing with purpose, sustainability is being discussed widely in more ways than ever before.

Meanwhile, art on the international hotel design scene continues to spill outside the frame, and often onto the walls. To understand more about how surface suppliers are coping with the rise in demand for vivid wallcoverings that can completely change an interior designs space, I spoke to CTD Architectural Tiles’ specifications sector manager, Andrew Sadler.

Hamish Kilburn: Can you explain how the industrial trend (especially in wallcoverings) has evolved recently?

Andrew Sadler: The industrial trend has developed mostly due to production technology. The introduction of ‘Continua Plus’ has allowed the production of larger sizes than ever before, which has been a real change in the trend, and the products specified. The first generation slabs were marble-based designs but now we are seeing more industrial design themes such as concrete and metal coming through. See Maiora Concrete 2.4 x 1.2 metre slabs.

Some factories are however are embracing the desire amongst specifiers and clients for authentic production techniques. We can see this in both our Zelij and Croma ranges.

Image caption: Zelig from CTD Architectural Tiles

Another development has been the fusions of traditional ceramic techniques and new industrial design concepts. This is best captured in a range like Diesel Glass Blocks, where a 1950s style glass brick has been captured in ceramic tile using decade-old glazing techniques updated for the 2020s.

HK: What would you say is the biggest pitfall among designers when specifying wallcovering?

AS: With tiles, the biggest pitfall among designers is probably understanding that the tile is just one element of a system. Consideration needs to be given to the substrate the tile is being fixed to and how the area is tanked to mitigate water ingress and potential failure. CTDA work with both Schluter Systems and Jackon to offer the specifier peace of mind through provision of a wide range of wetroom and substrate solutions. From a design perspective, trying to replicate the popular brick bond or herringbone/parquet style of floor tile used on walls can cause a challenge when the room is fitted with spotlights. All of a sudden the lipping on the tiles, unevidenced on the floor becomes all too apparent.

HK: Why are surfaces within public areas more important now than ever before?

AS: The public areas are the key selling areas of the space – the face of the project – so an aspirational appeal is crucial. This appeal needs to married however with a floor surface that is safe to use to protect the client from slips and trips and the hotel from litigation or reputational damage. We have seen the adoption over recent years in the UK of the Pendulum Test as the acceptable measure of a tile’s slip resistance. The implication of this is that we are seeing public spaces being fitted with tiles that have a higher slip resistance than was previously the norm. Whilst this is great from a safety perspective, it does cause challenges with cleaning these spaces as the more textured surfaces are more attractive to dirt. We see therefore a move away from lighter tones (whites, creams and ivories) towards darker tones (grey and anthracites) where the floor does not reveal its secrets so easily.

HK: How sustainable are CTD Architectural Tiles’ products?

AS: There are many advantages to ceramic tiles against alternative materials. Made from water, clay and fire – these elements give rise to a natural and quality material which is free of toxic substances, making it a strong alternative to materials such as plastic laminates or vinyl. Ceramic also has a very long life cycle and is therefore sustainable from a longevity point of view. There also isn’t the need for excessive maintenance, which makes it more advantageous than wood or parquet flooring for example.

HK: How was nature used as inspiration in your latest collections?

AS: Launched earlier this year, our Amazonia collection is the epitome of how botanical influences are finding their way into the commercial and hospitality sector. A celebration and seamless marriage between rustic handmade influences and the trend for biophilic design, the Amazonia collection is versatile and unique. Combining botanical patterns with a pared-back, nature-inspired palette to enliven spaces of all sizes, the collection offers endless opportunities to combine and mix distinctive tiles.

Image caption: Amazonia Grey Hexagon from CTD Architectural Tiles

For a more floral take on the botanical trend, ranges such as Maiora’s Custom Décor’s offer the possibility to create true feature walls with over-sized tiles – see p36 in this catalogue.

HK: How is technology allowing you to create more immersive products?

AS: One of our key launches this year was our 20mm-thick Porcelain Pavers collection, which is a testament to the advances in technology having a direct impact on the options that are available. The Porcelain Pavers collection is made up of 22 different tile ranges and each and every product meets all the technical and design requirements for exterior applications as well as indoor applications. The 20mm thickness means that it is extremely durable and resistant to breaks and scratches as well as being fade and frost resistant. Boasting a +36PTV (wet) slip-resistant structured surface, the tiles are also extremely low maintenance thanks to their exceptionally low porosity.

Image caption: Porcelain Pavers from CTD Architectural Tiles

Offering the added benefit of easy installation, the 20mm ranges can be installed in a number of different formats depending on the environment and project requirements. Providing the ultimate flexibility, the products can even be loose laid onto gravel, sand or pedestals, making them both accessible and re-usable. 

Advances in technology and production have also led to the introduction of a more diverse product portfolio in terms of styles, colours, patterns and designs. One of our most recent collections, Venice Villa, delivers the beauty of terrazzo captured in porcelain. The terrazzo look originates from using left over marble chippings into cement as a way to use excess product. A reinterpretation of this famous look, the Venice Villa collection is an exquisite contemporary twist on the traditional terrazzo trend, combining the appearance of crushed marble fragments with the excellent properties of fully body porcelain stoneware. Available in eight colourways in a polished, natural or structured finish, from monochrome Silver, Grey, Zinc and White to the more colourful options of Earth, Beige, Graphite and Ivory, the Venice Villa tiles offer an intriguing combination of colours that capture and reflect light, enhancing commercial spaces of all types. Expressing the beauty of the material that inspired the collection, the porcelain surfaces of the tiles combine the traditional look with modern materials making a surface that is easy to maintain and clean.

To find out more about CTD Architectural Tiles, please click here.

Main image credit: CTD Architectural Tiles

Al Faya Lodge: A boutique hotel made from stone and steel

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Al Faya Lodge: A boutique hotel made from stone and steel

Architecture firm Anarchitect was inspired by the desert location and opted to use raw materials to design the five-key boutique hotel…

Located in Sharjah, the third largest emeritus that make up the UAE, Al Faya Lodge is a striking architectural gem that was developed by SHEROOT. The lodge-like boutique hotel sits on undisturbed desert, of which architecture firm Anarchitect used as inspiration when crafting it out of raw materials and earthy colours, resulting in a camouflaged hotel within the red sands and baron landscape.

Embracing its heritage, the location of the lodge was formerly occupied by a clinic and grocery store in the 1960s, which were located next to one of the UAE’s first petroleum pumps.

Now the three single-story stone constructions have been transformed, including the addition of a luxury spa and salt-water swimming pool. Featuring just five guestrooms, its contemporary feel combines aspects of its original features, blended together with luxe, minimalist modernity.

image of seats by pool

Image credit: Sharjah Collection

Featuring a dining room, reception room, library and viewing deck, every aspect of the design looks to emphasise its surroundings. The guestrooms feature a skylight for star-gazing at night with a fire pit primed for recapping adventures.

The boutique hotel, steeped in authenticity, becomes one of of the main components of the Sharjah Collection, a unique group of luxury lodges and boutique hotels.

Main image credit: Sharjah Collection