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7 flooring trends that are leaving clear footprints in 2018

800 600 Hamish Kilburn

With this month’s ‘Spotlight On’ focusing on Flooring & Carpets, Hotel Designs lays out the fabulous flooring trends the industry is witnessing in 2018 and beyond…

This month, as we focus our lens on hotel flooring, Hotel Designs is going all out to give you an accurate take on how the flooring trends are shaping up for the back end of this year. From what our editorial team can see, rules have been broken – and rightly so. Here are a few top trends to keep an eye on for the rest of the year.

1) Zig zagging all over the place

Image credit: Havwoods

The days of blending into your surroundings are long gone. As tech improves, designers becoming braver and the designs become bolder. Skandi design has, in the past, dictated crisp, clean lines and minimalist surfaces, and adding a bit of personality into these interiors can be a task. Could the answer be asymmetric, random zig zags? Some designers believe so. Havwoods’ Chevron Collection adds flair and fun back into the modern floor.

2) Going Greige with age

Last year, grey was all the rage. It was everywhere; in the walls, in the fabrics and in the flooring. Evolving drastically from the ‘grey days’, beige is creeping back in – mainly due to its versatility and practicality as a colour.

3) Layering up

Image credit: Amtico

Creating what it says to be endless possibilities in international hotel design, Amtico’s Signiture Collection of vinyl flooring products is the result of sophisticated manufacturing. This creates another dimension and can help to set your hotel apart from others competing in the same space.

4) Clashing chords

Piano by Mutina

Piano by Mutina

Clashing in the most spectacular fashion, Piano by Domus launched at Clerkenwell Design Week as a striking, colourful partially glazed porcelain tile collection available exclusively from Domus in the UK.

With the Piano collection, Mutina re-discovered the technology of double charged clay, enabling them to obtain different textural effects in a wide range of colours. The slight variation in size and specific use of glaze creates a ‘vibrating’ effect, similar to the shimmering image of reflections on the water, creating an optical illusion of a non-geometrical figure.

5) Blonde bombshell 

image credit: Elivi Skiathos

Making a room look and feel bigger without physically knocking down walls is a challenge for even the most established designers. Blonde could be the answer. Adding accents of lighter shades in the flooring will automatically lift the interior space, and modernised the hotel guestroom without taking away from the character.

6) Handscraped flooring

Wooden flooring in contemporary interiors

Steering away from gloss, the days of achieving ‘perfect’ interiors are behind us. Now, it’s all about bringing the outdoors indoors, and welcoming imperfection, to reflect the natural, authentic beauty of the wood grain, while also making the surface look worn in.

7) Go big or go home

2018 has been said to be the year of loud and in-your-face ceilings. But as the curve is predicted, the adventurous designers rebel and have this time responded with the statement being amplified from the floor, creating the same quirky result. So, if this trend is anything to go by, be bold – go big or go home.

One designer’s harmony between music and interior design

984 676 Hamish Kilburn

Under blue, cloudless skies in London’s Clerkenwell district, Hamish Kilburn meets Mutina’s Ronan Bouroullec to understand more about his interior design partnership with Domus and how, with a new collection, he has opened up links between music and interior design…

It was while I was watching a panel discussion on interior design tile trends at this year’s Clerkenwell Design Week when the question of what musical instrument our industry is most similar to crossed my mind.

Celebrating the launch of a new partnership between Mutina and Domus, the irregular shapes and uneven tones of the new tile collection, Piano, gave me the answer. Just like an 88-key grand piano, which alone is a striking interior design feature in any room or suite, international hotel design can also strike many chords. While some notes collaborating together are powerful enough to send a shiver down your spine, others effortlessly blend perfectly into the atmosphere. Another similar feature between our industry and monochrome object is the skill and practice that is required to become an ‘expert’ – let alone the many setbacks that are often experienced along the way.

Piano collection

Image credit: Domus

Replicating the percussion instrument in all manners of ways, the Piano range is made with coloured clays to which layers of glaze are added in different widths. There are five base colours: white, grey, blue, green and pink and two rectangular sizes (7.5 x 30cm and 10 x 30cm). The tiles are arranged by colour and are grouped together by the lead colourway in the same box, this allows for the greatest variation and ability to create a vibrant fitted tile layout. Piano is suitable for floors and walls, both indoors and outdoors.

In order to learn more about the new range and the designer behind it, I sat down with Ronan Bouroullec, who is one half of the genius behind Piano.

Image credit: Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec

Image credit: Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec

Hamish Kilburn: Where do you tend to find inspiration for ideas?

Ronan Bouroullec: I look at materials and how they form. I never find inspiration from movies or an experiences in life. It’s always a look and the tactile aspect that inspires me.

HK: Are the challenges always the same when designing products?

RB: No! The challenges are always different. It’s difficult to list them all – there are many, and they are everywhere. I don’t think many people understand how long the process really takes. There are many point of views and opinions that you have to take in along the way, making it a long journey full of many twists and turns.

HK: Can you explain what you meant when you said at Clerkenwell Design Week that you prefer to be less known in the industry?

RB: I like to be in front of people that do not respect me too much. That sounds odd, I know, but I like to be able to prove myself to others. There is always a good reason why I have designed something in such a way, and I enjoy to be in front of someone who would question that, allowing me to explain.

Piano collection

Image credit: Domus

HK: Your latest piece with Domus Tiles is called Piano. Was there a designer growing up that really struck a chord with you?

RB: I was 15 years old when I decided I wanted to be a designer. As far as I can remember, I have always been impressed with objects and things. I had a lot of inspiration along the way but there was not one mentor that I consider to be more superior than the other. They all helped.

HK: What advice would you give to young designers?

RB: My advice would be to work. It can be difficult to survive, at times, but the skill is not to give up.  Try to find other ways to get through it and some years can feel longer than others.

HK: How important is collaboration?

RB: As a designer, you are nothing without collaboration. You can have a good idea, but if there was no one to manufacture it then your idea would only ever be a dream. It would not exist. We work and operate in a collective environment.

HK: How do you react to trends?

RB: Honestly, I don’t want to know about them. I try to do something that I feel is different, new and interesting. Trends have already passed. I try to do something in advance. This can sometimes become a trend, which is very flattering. I like to be copied because people will only ever copy good things.

To read more about the editor’s highlights of Clerkenwell Design Week, click here

Main image credit: Mutina