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Last chance to apply for Outstanding Property Award

730 565 Hamish Kilburn
Last chance to apply for Outstanding Property Award

Calling all interior designers, architects and developers: The deadline to submit international projects for Outstanding Property Award, of which Hotel Designs is a proud media partner of, is December 15…

December 15, this Sunday, is the deadline to submit entries for Outstanding Property Award (OPAL). The global search to find the best architecture, interior design and property development projects from around the world will climax with a spectacular award ceremony in London next year.

“The awards celebrates and honours diverse and exceptional projects globally. “We aim to highlight and celebrate the most exceptional design projects in the world, raising their awareness and honoring its creators,” said Jesper Thompson, co-founder of OPAL in a recent interview with Hotel Designs

Described on its website as “not just another award”, OPAL creates the opportunity for each participant to gain visibility for their latest innovative projects and allows developers, designers and architects to connect with leading professionals within the industry and beyond.

The most outstanding property projects around the world will be championed in London next year with the following awards up for grabs:

INTERIOR DESIGN:

  • Overall Winner – Interior Design
    Awarded to the highest scoring entry in Interior Design. Will receive the coveted OPAL gold Trophy.
  • Platinum Winner – Interior Design
    Awarded to projects with a Jury score of over 8.5 average.
  • Winner – Interior Design
    Awarded to projects with a Jury score of over 7.5 average.
  • Honorable Mention – Interior Design
    Awarded to projects with a high amount of honorable mentions scores. Can be multiple Honorable mention winners.
  • Official Selection – Interior Design
    Awarded to projects has been shortlisted by the pre-selection Jury.

ARCHITECTURE:

  • Overall Winner – Architecture
    Awarded to the highest scoring entry in Architecture. Will receive the coveted OPAL gold Trophy.
  • Platinum Winner – Architecture
    Awarded to projects with a Jury score of over 8.5 average.
  • Winner – Architecture
    Awarded to projects with a Jury score of over 7.5 average.
  • Honorable Mention – Architecture
    Awarded to projects with a high amount of honorable mentions scores. Can be multiple Honorable mention winners.
  • Official Selection – Architecture
    Awarded to projects has been shortlisted by the pre-selection Jury.

PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT:

  • Overall Winner – Property Development
    Awarded to the highest scoring entry in Property Development. Will receive the coveted OPAL gold Trophy.
  • Platinum Winner – Property Development
    Awarded to projects with a Jury score of over 8.5 average.
  • Winner – Property Development
    Awarded to projects with a Jury score of over 7.5 average.
  • Honorable Mention – Property Development
    Awarded to projects with a high amount of honorable mentions scores. Can be multiple Honorable mention winners.
  • Official Selection – Property Development
    Awarded to projects has been shortlisted by the pre-selection Jury.

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS:

The Jury Panel will nominate Outstanding Achievement Awards in the following categories:

    • Outstanding Sustainability Award
      Awarded to the project with most Sustainability votes.
    • Outstanding Social Impact Award
      Awarded to the project with most Humanitarian votes.
    • Outstanding Innovation Award
      Awarded to the project with most Innovation votes.

To find out more information Outstanding Property Award, and how to submit an entry, visit the website

TowerEight - Hotel Construction facts

Guest Blog – TowerEight: 13 things about hotel construction

767 407 Guest Blog

Thousands of new hotel rooms have to be built every year to cater for demand in the UK. More than 7,000 will be built in London in one year alone.

According to PWC, the hotel occupancy rate in the UK’s capital is as much as 84%. With nearly 150,000 hotel rooms in London that is a lot of bookings, and the average room rate is £145. With the hotel market continuing to grow, specialist teams are put in place by developers to ensure that rooms are up to the standards that guests demand in modern, world-class facilities.

The following list from TowerEight highlights the specialist considerations that developers need to think about when building a new hotel, and how both art and science are involved in creating the perfect hotel room…

1. What To Do With Corridors
Corridors are a tricky issue in hotel developments given that they are non-revenue generating, yet still need to feature on almost all levels. A sign of a good hotel architect is the minimal use of corridors wherever possible, without compromising the design, to maximise revenue-generating space. Alternatively, corridors can be used to generate revenue, whether by showcasing artwork that can be purchased by guests or as an advertising space for food and beverage offers.

2. If Everyone Has a Bath at the Same Time…
Most boilers in hotels are oversized and only run at 60% efficiency. Even ‘green’ hotels are only able to handle 75% of the peak demand. So, with average occupancy at 84%, hotels have to hope that guests don’t all choose to have a bath at the same time. Though, with the most popular times for ablution being pre-breakfast, and pre-dinner, it must be close sometimes.

TowerEight - Hotel Construction facts

3. Wear and Tear
Hotel furnishing and fittings are gauged by “rub rate” i.e. the amount of wear they can take. Hotel designers choose a fabric for curtains and carpets by its ability to be hard-wearing. In a top London hotel, cashmere may be used for the curtains, cushions and throws, with a typical rub rate in the low thousands. In cost-conscious hotels, a wool mix carpet would be expected to be trodden on more than 2,000 times!

4. Cost Per Key
Working with hotel developers, you will frequently hear the term ‘cost per key’ as opposed to cost per sqm/sq. ft. as used in commercial/residential sectors.

TowerEight - Hotel Construction facts
5. The Environment

Increasingly, environmentally conscious hotels are utilising ‘greywater’. This is recycled (and filtered onsite) water taken from showers and reused to flush toilets. In these hotels, you have a one in two chance of having come across the same water during a long stay! However, this solution is obviously much better for the environment.

6. How Often to Paint
Hotels are typically refurbished every three to four years, dependent on the level of maintenance they receive and the planned level of fatigue for the room décor at the time of construction. Refurbished does not mean redesigned, a refurb might mean a lick of paint and a deep clean. On average, a budget hotel room may receive more than 20 tins of paint in a 10-year period, compared to more than 40 tins in one of London’s luxury hotels.

TowerEight - Hotel Construction facts

7. Clever Design Tricks
Many guests assume a little undercut to their bathroom door means it is poor fitting, but it’s actually a regular design facet of many hotels, there to help air circulation and extract moisture from the bathroom.

8. Keeping Up With Trends
Tea and coffee making facilities (TCMF) are a bit of a throwback and there is a developing trend of incorporating social hubs into hotel lobbies, receptions and surrounding pop-ups instead. We predict that TCMF will continue to reduce, or evolve into something more personalised.

9. Practical Colour Schemes
It is rare to find a hotel room with solid colours – patterns, flecks and multiple colours are nearly always used to hide wear and tear or stains!

10. Fresh Air
Fresh air to a room either comes through the window, if it can be opened, or is ducted in through the system – typically installed in the lobby. Hotels of more than three stories will rarely ever have windows that can open fully because of the threat of legal action around any unfortunate guest that tries to climb out.

TowerEight - Hotel Construction facts

11. Solving Problems
Hotels are traditionally graded by the views (i.e. sea view) so internal hotel rooms are generally perceived as a lower class and let at lower rates. The aim is to achieve 100% occupancy at maximum rate. To get around this, designers make clever use of light-boxes and light rails in corridors to imitate light, allowing hoteliers to successfully let internal rooms with no natural light. The irony of the situation is that most people check in post 5:30pm when it’s already dark outside.

12. Height Challenges
Hotel signage at high level is often installed by abseilers. A team of between two to three guys can erect a 10-metre hotel sign, more than 10 stories high, in just 48 hours.

13. Tradition
Most hotels don’t have room or floor no.13…superstition still rules!

towereight.co.uk

Nakheel, Minor Hotels - AVANI Ibn Battuta Dubai

Minor Hotels, Nakheel join for new-build AVANI in Dubai

600 400 Daniel Fountain

Minor Hotels, currently with a portfolio of 156 hotels and resorts in 24 countries across Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Europe, South America, Africa and the Indian Ocean, has signed a management agreement with UAE master developer Nakheel for a new AVANI hotel in Dubai.

The 372-key AVANI Ibn Battuta Dubai Hotel will be developed by Nakheel and will be located adjacent to the recently-opened Ibn Battuta Metro Link, which is directly connected to Ibn Battuta Mall. The new-build 18-storey hotel will feature a pool, a spa, a gym, an all-day dining restaurant, a coffee shop and car parking.

Nakheel, Minor Hotels - AVANI Ibn Battuta Dubai

Launched by Minor Hotels in 2011, AVANI Hotels & Resorts is an upscale, contemporary brand appealing to millennial minded travellers who appreciate quality and value. AVANI currently has 17 properties in operation in Thailand, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Malaysia, the Seychelles, Mozambique, Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, Zambia and the UAE and MH has plans to grow the brand across its global footprint.

Minor Hotels currently operates 14 properties in the Middle East across four of its brands – Anantara, AVANI, Oaks and PER AQUUM and has a further strong pipeline in the region with new properties under development in the United Arab Emirates (in Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Ras Al Khaimah), Bahrain, Morocco and Tunisia.